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Rob Toneguzzo

Broken Back Long Seax inspired War Knife WIP

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"Finitiob" was coined by Joël Mercier a couple years ago.  He swears it was a typo involving his French/English keyboard skills, but it has come to mean extreme skill in hand finishing.

;)

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I appreciate the feedback guys though I am not sure I understand all of it haha :lol:

 

Well it is pretty much finished. Just have to take some good pics 

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Well here it is all done, I am happy with how this turned out in the end esp since it is my first sheath of this type and also my first go at leather tooling (thanks Josh).

 

I have a confession....I had become a bit stale and board with making knives and I feel this has lit a fire again and inspired me to delve into the artist within me.

 

I am really looking forward to my next project which will be a sheath for my pattern welded broken back seax.

 

I also got some 90cm lengths of 15n20 and 1075 so this year I hope to get creative with my blades too.

 

Thank you to all who have come along for the ride and for those who have posted invaluable info throughout this forum esp in history.

 

Anyhow it is Friday night in Australia and I am about to crack a beer and light the BBQ.

 

looking forward to any feedback etc.

 

Oh...one more thing. I would appreciate any info/suggestions on your preferred suspension for this type of sheath as it might very well see active service on my bow hunts.

 

 

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What a great piece of work there Rob. This has been a wonderful WIP to follow along, watching your journey through the completion. I also learned a lot from watching this and seeing how you progressed through the different parts. I hope Alan pins this thread.

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Posted (edited)

For the suspension, I think you will need one or two more of those copper rings. I have seen these long scabbards done 2 ways, The first ties all thee rings to a single loop and the other ties the top two  and leaves a third ring to a separate loop

Edited by Joshua States
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Rob, that one is awesome!! whoot_whoot.jpg Knocked out of the park!!

 

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Very cool! Great WIP. I agree that this should be pinned :D

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Yeah, it could use a pin. B)

 

I'm waiting on the pattern-welded one, myself...

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I've found a baldric over-the-shoulder carry rig works well for these big seaxes.

 

Excellent work sir.

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Thanks guys and thanks Alan for the pin. It is a great honour.

2 hours ago, GEzell said:

I've found a baldric over-the-shoulder carry rig works well for these big seaxes.

 

Excellent work sir.

Thanks George,  I have done that with some hawks in the past and agree it would suit. I have made a leather back quiver and was thinking I could ad 3 straps with toggles from the shoulder strap on that too. Would be easy to take on and off when hunting and not get in the way.

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1 minute ago, Rob Toneguzzo said:

Thanks guys and thanks Alan for the pin. It is a great honour.

Thanks George,  I have done that with some hawks in the past and agree it would suit. I have made a leather back quiver and was thinking I could ad 3 straps with toggles from the shoulder strap on that too. Would be easy to take on and off when hunting and not get in the way.

I'd like to see how that works. Both for the quiver and for this Seax.

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This turned out really great! I like the raven theme that pops up throughout.

I never get enouugh of seeing seaxes.

 

For the suspension, I believe that these birka style sheaths come together in another ring which is attached on a belt and carried at your side like a sword.

But for hunting hanging it horizontal on your back might be more comfortable and less likely to get hung up.

I did some reenactment and found out you can carry quite a big knife in the small of your back without it getting in the way.

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Rob this is absolutely awesome and a fantastic demonstration of artistry and skill. I can feel the itch for another seax beginning.

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Nicely done..  How many hours do you figure you have into the whole build? 

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10 hours ago, JenniferP said:

  How many hours do you figure you have into the whole build? 

Hi Jennifer,

I recorded the time spent in cartons of beer.B)

 

I honestly lost track of the total time spent but the blade took about 4 hours to forge.

 

Then there was finishing with draw files and hand sanding which took hours  (I have to get a proper grinder as It will reduce so much time here)

 

The handle carvings probably about 4 hours to carve once I worked out the design.

 

Making fittings and fitting them took ages too and is my least favourite part. 
 

 As this is not my job I work on my projects any chance I get and I just loose track of time but I do know it is not worth my while to sell things as My hourly rate would be peanuts.
 

 

Edited by Rob Toneguzzo

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Rob Thanks for the info.. That is a fantastic looking blade, handle and sheath..     Do you like the round handle?  Or should I ask.. Is it round?  It looks round in the photos..  If it is round, do you find it hard to index properly? 

I'm not up on viking trends so don't know the style well in it's full splendor.  

I fully understand about time and counting the cases.. :)    I'm just always curious..  it's part of the long term smith thing.. I'm always curious about time, materials and any special tools.. 

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3 hours ago, JenniferP said:

Rob Thanks for the info.. That is a fantastic looking blade, handle and sheath..     Do you like the round handle?  Or should I ask.. Is it round?  It looks round in the photos..  If it is round, do you find it hard to index properly? 

I'm not up on viking trends so don't know the style well in it's full splendor.  

I fully understand about time and counting the cases.. :)    I'm just always curious..  it's part of the long term smith thing.. I'm always curious about time, materials and any special tools.. 

 
Hi Jennifer,

Thanks for the compliments and feedback. The first part of the handle is round and the second part is also round but slightly flared. It feels secure in a swing/ chop action due to the flare but I was a bit concerned how it would be stabbing with resistance ( I know a lot of people worry about no guard on stabbing blades) so I tried stabbing into solid things including a stump and the grip was easily secure enough to hold on to though with the blade geometry I feel there would be very little resistance at all on a flesh target.

 

That being said It is a very basic handle shape and I have made handles that are  more comfortable to hold though  I feel it is fit for purpose and pleasant enough and secure in the hand. 

 

If however I had to choose a handle material solely for practicality on this type of blade I personally would choose an oval shape with stacked leather every time. 

Speaking of tools....If I could choose 2 tools tomorrow that would make my life so much easier and speed things up they would be a belt grinder and bandsaw.

 

 

 

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Rob I  think the work is amazing. Just went and looked at the photos again.. Brilliant. 

I'm not fond of round handles from an indexing standpoint.. I'm not critiquing your work.. Which is beautiful .. I just know from not only making knives for a long time but in martial arts as well.. Indexing and knowing blade position is important When you can't see the blade.. 

Again, I think it's stunning work..   Can you feel the weight of the edge easy enough for indexing? 

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Wow. I have a simplistic view for knife making. This however is just enough. And the history is the most interesting part. Well done!

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9 hours ago, JenniferP said:

Rob I  think the work is amazing. Just went and looked at the photos again.. Brilliant. 

I'm not fond of round handles from an indexing standpoint.. I'm not critiquing your work.. Which is beautiful .. I just know from not only making knives for a long time but in martial arts as well.. Indexing and knowing blade position is important When you can't see the blade.. 

Again, I think it's stunning work..   Can you feel the weight of the edge easy enough for indexing? 

 
Hi Jennifer,

While I know of blades such as the Burmese Dha and some Gladius having round handles I also prefer an oval cross section in relation to indexing the blade in a cut. 
 

In a stabbing/thrusting action I feel it does not matter so much but in chopping/slashing an oval, squarish or tear drop cross section feels better to me too though a curved blade (even with a round handle) seems to naturally index in the swing to some degree. 
 

That being said this blade is straight and to answer your question about this blade, I have done some test cutting on some golden cane palms and while I am sure an oval cross section would feel better slashing I did not have issue with edge alignment during the cuts though I am no martial artist and was conscious of the edge alignment. 
 

 

 

 

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Stunning, Rob. Seriously nice work man. I like all of the fittings, especially the raven, that's a nice touch. 

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