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Hi all!!! How are you? This is my first post in this prestigious forum, I hope they are very good.

I am Jorge Iruzubieta, from Argentina. I am 46 years old. I've been making knives for a few years but as a hobby. Until I decided a while ago to start doing them in a more professional way since I'm really passionate about blades.

That is why some time ago I bought an electric oven to do heat treatments. I use 5160 steel. I made some specimens (probetas)  and hardened them at different temperatures to see what the ideal temperature is in my oven. The temperatures were from left to right: 830, 840, 850, 860 and 870 ° C. I broke them to see the size of the grain. I photographed them. I have no practice in observing grain size. I understand that what is observed in the photographs is fine but I would like your opinion. I would also like to be told what temperature they think is the most suitable for hardening this steel (5160) as seen in the photographs. I will really appreciate your help. I hope this message is understood as I do not speak English and I am using a translator.
Later I will upload photographs of some of my works.

Thank you very much!
Greetings to all.
Jorge Iruzubieta

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Edited by jorge iruzubieta

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830°c provides maximum hardness and toughness. And according to some lab tests, optimal toughness is obtained with a 205°c temper. 

 

You did not mention in which state the steel was before the quench. Proper normalisation must be done first.

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27 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

830°c provides maximum hardness and toughness. And according to some lab tests, optimal toughness is obtained with a 205°c temper. 

 

You did not mention in which state the steel was before the quench. Proper normalisation must be done first.

Joel, thank you very much for answering !!! I did not do any heat treatment before hardening.
I can see now that maybe I should have normalized before.
I always normalize my blades before hardening. But do not normalize these pieces.
Thank you very much. Regards.
Jorge

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I can't help, but your translator gives the most natural translations I have seen. Which one do you use?

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9 hours ago, Ron Benson said:

I can't help, but your translator gives the most natural translations I have seen. Which one do you use?

Hi Ben, how are you?
I use Google Translator. I usually translate from Spanish to English and then from English to Spanish to see if I modify the meaning I want to give the text. If so, I change some words. The Spanish language has many synonyms.
Thank you very much.
Regards.

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Joël covered it pretty well.  Thermal cycling is important to grain reduction.  Temperature right before quench is a much much smaller part for grain size (assuming your temperature is reasonable, if you are nearly molten then grain growth will be pretty big).  

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Here's what I use as a guideline for 5160 steel

May not be a perfect recipe but at least it's a starting point for you

5160 STEEL
Preheat: 1150 F / 7 minutes
Heat treat: 1525 F / 7 min
Oil Quench
Temper: 400 F / 1 hour
Temper: 375 F / 1 hour

 

Sorry I don't have anything converted to celsius scale

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Jerrod, Jeff !!! Thank you very much for answering my concern.
Now I just need you to tell me if the size of the grain seen in the photographs I publish is correct. I would thank you a lot!

Thank you very much again!
Cheers!

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The one at 830 C looks correct,the others are un poquito gorda.

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I've been having good results with normalizing at 870C and hardening at 830C

 

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Gentlemen, thank you very much for answering me and for your suggestions. I will keep them in mind!
Do you think that if I had previously made a normalization the grain would be even smaller, considering that these samples were not forged or subjected to heat before hardening?
Thank you very much!!!

Jorge.

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54 minutes ago, jorge iruzubieta said:

Do you think that if I had previously made a normalization the grain would be even smaller, considering that these samples were not forged or subjected to heat before hardening?

Yes they would.  They were absolutely subjected to heat and forging, just not by you, but by the manufacturer.  A couple normalizations would improve things, but may not always be necessary.  

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