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Jeremy Blohm

Viking langsax

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I'm starting a viking langseax and I was wondering if you guys can help me through the process and do this right!?!?

 

So far all I have is a bar of wrought iron twisted and drawn out to this. The twist isn't as tight or as even as I would have liked but I moves my vise and haven't bolted it to the floor in it's new location so I kinda struggled with it.

 

 

 

 

Resized_20191206_171148.jpeg

Edited by Jeremy Blohm

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Did you add anything to the wrought, or is it just twisted wrought?  Either way, you really need to bolt down your vise, the twists absolutely have to be tight, a minimum of six to eight lines per inch.  And the starting size of the bar really needs to be close to the finished size of the blade, you really can't do much drawing or forging down to the pattern or it'll go off big time.  For a multibar pattern 3/8" square is the biggest you can really do and expect the pattern to be relatively unchanged.  I usually try to have them between 1/4" square and 3/8" square after grinding/forging.  

 

In other words, if you're gonna call it that, you have some work to do.  If you just want to say "inspired by," then all you need to do is even up your twists and make sure the bar is of uniform size first.  And you may want to throw another alloy in the mix.  Wrought alone gives a very subtle effect.  Adding high-phosphorus wrought makes it stand out a lot more (darker etch), as does adding mild (bright etch), 15n20 (also bright), or 10XX (dark etch).  

 

A few posts down in this thread you can see how I did it on a fantasy piece using semi-authentic techniques with low-P/high-P wrought and 15n20 (and I know, 15n20 isn't authentic, but neither is a coal forge :lol:):

 

 

There's also a long description by JPH somewhere in the 'Is your beard still burning" thread down in Fiery Beards.  And all of Emiliano's posts from the last few years, and so on.  You just have to decide how "authentic" you want it to look, and prepare your core bars accordingly.

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Wow that's incredible....how did I miss that topic it wasn't that long ago it was posted?!:mellow:

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Forged out a bunch of wrought Resized_20191207_113455.jpeg

 

Stacked themResized_20191207_114522.jpeg

 

My magic fluxResized_20191207_114804.jpeg

 

And in the fire

 

Resized_20191207_114831.jpeg

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And we have a billet. I'm going to cut and fold to get a little higher layer count. I need more charcoal before I go any further.

 

Resized_20191207_132359.jpeg

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Now that's a billet!  I can tell you have a power hammer.  B)

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Awesome!

First, what you may want to know; "viking" or scandanavian sax are spelled "sax"; "seax" is more of an Anglo-Anglo-saxon spelling. 

 

And, if you're not set up well enough to twist, I think a wrought San-mai or similar construction would totally be a breath of fresh air to contrast all the modern p-weld reconstructions. Add a fuller to it, and/or engraving, and/or some inlay, and it'd really stand out. 

 

As far as the twist goes, for a singlewide stack I prefer to twist 1/2" stock, then forge weld the threads down which brings it to 3/8" from there I make my stack. I do it like this because these were pretty thick at the spine anyway and it leaves room for error. If I where to do a double wide stack I would go half that size (which is a common construction).  Some people get away with the thinner bars somehow, but I cant. 

 

If you want the twists higher up in the finished piece, you make the edge material thicker (taller, or whatever. Rectangular).

 

Good luck man!!!

Edited by Zeb Camper
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I have soooo much to learn as far as blade types, time periods they existed and where they were made. This is going to be a good learning experience for me. I need to get some literature and start reading. I know there is a few good threads with links to online literature that I'm going to search for when I get home. Tomorrow I'm bolting the bench/vise stand to the floor. Maybe I will make a twisting jig? I seen a picture of yours @Zeb Camper I have to find where I seen it. I know I liked the idea!!!

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I found these pictures in Owens topic under the sub-forum, History: how big does seaxes get....posted by Jake Cleland. I think this will be what I go for. I wanna make something BIG!!!

 

post-1794-125969864456.jpg

 

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Edited by Jeremy Blohm
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my jig is in here along with lots of other great advice from Alan mostly. It's a modified pipe wrench/C clamp welded to a 1×1 arm that's welded to an angle iron base that I can chuck up in my vise. I also welded an eye to support long twists. The way I do twists is in sections. Start with a 10" section and twist it until it's time for more heat, heat 10" again but overlapping the previous twist. So, when you twist, the ends of the bar will get cold faster and the ends will be looser, so you reheat some of what you already heated previously (to the point it started to loosen up) and clamp the tightest portion of the twist and twist until time for more heat and so forth. Niels also does a good job with an oxy-acetaline torch twisting in smaller sections. Make sense? 

 

You should join the "seax files" group on facebook. If you look through the files under the group info there is a ton of great info. This forum has good info too, but it's a little more in depth over there. Expect strong criticism with that bunch though. They mean well. 

 

 

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SO after much deliberation I've decided to make a random pattern Damascus billet for the edge bar. I have a bunch of 15n20 I just need to gather up some 10xx series steel.

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Picked up more charcoal today so tomorrow I will forge some more on this. I'm going g to try to get all the bars made by the 20th because I am having another back surgery and I will be out of commission for at least 6 weeks. I'm thinking of using these 15n20 band saw blades I picked up at quad state and some rail road track I have to make the Damascus for the edge bar. From what I have been able to find is rail track is somewhere in the range of 1070?

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Dang! If I had known that I would have hardened my first anvil.

 

What did you do to your back man? Dont hurt yourself before surgery! Take the time to heal up right! Best o' luck on sax & surgery!

 

 

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Well my back has been shot for a long time. My first back surgery was back in 2004 when I was 17 years old. I did a lot of dirt biking,  snow boarding, and stunt BMX and I destroyed my back having fun. Now I had a fusion in September of 2018 and now I'm going in for a spinal stimulator. 

 

I'm getting ready to fire the forge up. I'm going to cut and stack this billet in 3 and add some wrought iron wagon tire in between layers to get a little more mass. If I have time maybe I will get to drawing out the rail track for the Damascus. I will get some more pictures as soon as my phone gets a little more charge to it.

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Wagon tire.Resized_20191211_103539.jpeg

 

Forge it on edge a little cold and it splits Resized_20191211_105347.jpeg

 

Cut to lengthResized_20191211_105502.jpeg

 

Resized_20191211_105552.jpeg

 

Now I'm forging these bars down a bit.

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Cut the original billet in 3 

 

Resized_20191211_111933.jpegResized_20191211_112221.jpeg

 

heading to the fire again.

 

Resized_20191211_113424.jpeg

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Had some delamination so I cut the bad section out and drew out the rest.

Resized_20191211_131508.jpeg

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The twist didnt go as good as I had planned but here is where I'm at now. I might nip off the cool end of the bar in this picture?

Resized_20191211_142426.jpeg

3 more bars to go.

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It does get a little funky down on that end, doesn't it?  That wide wagon tire split along the welds, which is pretty normal for that stuff.  If you have more, just remember to always have it at welding heat when you bend it that way.  Folks who make black powder rifle barrels like those wide tires.  

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Yeah!!! That end got hotter than the rest and ended up twisting more. And trying to twist it back DOESN'T work out!!!!!:unsure:

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Hopefully tomorrow I will get the rail track drawn out for the Damascus edge bar. I'm really enjoying working with the wrought iron!!! It adds another level of difficulty to it. It's not just heat and beat!!! You really have to pay attention to everything.

 

And I forgot to mention I meant for the wagon tire to split there (this time). It happened to me the last time I worked it so I used it to my advantage this time. B)

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My brother wants a hatchet so part of this rail track will probably go to that project also.

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