Jump to content

Damascus ideas


Gerhard Gerber
 Share

Recommended Posts

12 hours ago, Joshua States said:

The delamination of the giant saw blade could be that the blade had a coating on it that buggered the weld. A lot of those large bandsaw type blades are coated with a  substance that provides friction resistance for ease of cutting. It is death to forge welding. 

I cleaned up everything nice & shiny on the belt grinder, all the teeth off etc.....I have the blisters to prove it! :D

8 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Plus some of those giant power hacksaw blades are M2 High Speed Steel.  Not forge-friendly!  But it doesn't explain the file crumbling...

The bandsaw blades are a known quantity as far as the goes, the friend that gave me them just finished another bearing/band saw  blade damascus kukri using the same stuff.

7 hours ago, John N said:

 

Crumbly is usually over heating. Ive had O1 'cottage cheese' before now. No going back once its gone!

 I have obviously done that many times before, and no arguments that's exactly what it looked like, just no idea how and more importantly when it happened....

 

I put the timing chain billet on a belt grinder diet but one side has pits and I confirmed the crack down the middle.

I should be able to salvage this, but I'm worried about san mai'ing this to 52100, something I've done successfully before, thick I'll go back to charcoal for that exercise.

 

Anyway, thanks for the advice and encouragement, try and try again :ph34r:

 

I never got to use my modified monkey wrench, and the prep time required was a lesson in itself, part of the reason I didn't even attempt the needle files.

Steel powder was a major topic this weekend, we even discussed grinding down files.  Can't help but think that would be ignoring a lesson I've already learned about things being worth the effort......

 

We've have a lead for the torsion springs from a VW Beetle front suspension, as soon as I get those I start my first folder.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/6/2020 at 1:14 AM, Gerhard Gerber said:

oversized hacksaw blade

I know the bandsaw blade is good stuff, but you did say hacksaw!  :P

And yeah, grinding up files is not how they get steel powder.  :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/7/2020 at 4:10 PM, Alan Longmire said:

I know the bandsaw blade is good stuff, but you did say hacksaw!  :P

And yeah, grinding up files is not how they get steel powder.  :lol:

Write that off to English 2nd language :lol:

Between the heat and working full day again and the stress that goes with that I'm getting to very little.  I'm slightly torn because despite "closing my book" I'm sitting with a few orders, while I was planning on trying new and interesting things this year for my own enjoyment, and when I have time, maybe not grinding down files, but hearth steel at the very least.

 

I was just thinking, if the steel makes sparks coming off the belt it's oxidizing and probably not as it should be anymore?

 

I was about to split the timing chain billet and weld it to the 52100 in preparation for Saturday, but I was worried about rust between now and then, is it better to clean and weld on the day?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, grinding dust is oxidized and mixed with powdered abrasive.  You can smelt it, but it's not good for welding.

As for cleaning and rust, that's up to you. 

 

Re: second languages, be glad I don't attempt Afrikaans at you! :ph34r:

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Round 2

I ground out all the cracks on the billet that didn't crumble, cleaned up the edges etc and it seemed good for another attempt.

Cleaned up the timing chain billet, split it in half and trimmed back to two even consolidated pieces.  Welded these either side of a flattened and cleaned up piece of bearing race.

 

The first billet did a duck bill as soon as it got heat, gave the rear part a few hits, looked solid'ish but popped apart from one tap on the side.

The timing chain seemed to weld, so I went and ground off the welds and to even up the sides.

Went well for 2 heats then the layers started sliding at the front.  Carried on working from the back and save some of it.

 

I have enough of the bearing race sticking out the back to forge out a hidden tang, and enough for a small blade IF I can hit it on the side and draw it out without delaminations.

 

Unfortunately from all the forging the spots of the leopard spot effect the timing chain gives are a bit large. Cleaned up and etched so I know the layers are even at least....thin but even.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I heat treated the blade yesterday, used a pipe inside the gas forge, edge quench.......and in between the quench plates, and I heard  ping. Now I know what they mean by "ping" :(

 

The chain on the one side seems to have popped loose to a limited extent, I etched it a long time yesterday (this photo is pre-HT) and I'm trying to decide if it goes on the scrap heap...or gets a handle.

IMG_20200118_115821[1].jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Necro thread.......arise! :D

I recently got some more steel, one piece of 1084, lots of 1070 and one "damascus bundle" of 1070 and 15n20, so I'm itching to try again.......only give or take 3 years later!

 

We were discussing what pattern to go for over beers Saturday, wanted to ask here and then something felt familiar......asked already :lol:

 

The starting stock is 40mm wide so my plan is to get a roughly 25-30mm square bar, put in a few twists and forge out.

 

I'm pretty sure the coal I was using caused the steel to crumble like that, since my new gas forge is not running I'll start op the old coal forge for the first time in yonkers and just revert to normal charcoal. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gerhard, best of luck to you on this attempt.  I've been itching to try some twists.  I've been doing random patterns mostly that seem to take on more of a ladder pattern with my little press.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Gerhard Gerber said:

put in a few twists and forge out.

 

Make them very tight twists!  A slow twist, like 2/cm, will draw out to look like a very stretched lazy twist.  Aim for as tight as you can get it, and try not to draw for length. Plain old flattening out is fine. B)

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

 

Make them very tight twists!  A slow twist, like 2/cm, will draw out to look like a very stretched lazy twist.  Aim for as tight as you can get it, and try not to draw for length. Plain old flattening out is fine. B)

Alan, I was contemplating that very same lazy twist you're warning me against.....for safety's sake :lol:
I'm not one to ignore advice, so I'll change the plan of attack to get as many twists as possible.....understand the why.....B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

I haven't a clue Alan, I'll weigh it some time.

I'm a bit unsure how to proceed, but basic plan from here is to forge it back to square and slightly thinner, then give it a proper twist.
From there it depends on the diameter bar I end up with and what width I can forge it to, if too thin I'm considering forging to square, cutting and stacking.

Since this seems to be my first success that feels like a huge risk, but might be worthwhile!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 months later...

Six months and a gallbladder removal later, finally got back to this......
I'd previously tackled it with the angle grinder, etched it to check for any weld left.
Friday I did some more grinding and another etch, and into the forge it went.

Forged it out to a square bar and started twisting.

Not sure if this was a mistake, but I was worried about how slim the bar had gotten, knew I would need to grind so I forged down the ridges a bit with the idea there would be less to grind off.  

Saturday morning I ground out all the cold shuts and etched, ended up with a rather think rod.

Figured I either had to forge it square, cut and stack, but that would loose more material so I decide I'd cut the billet in half and make 2 smaller knives.

That was a good call because I couldn't get much width, forged out the first little blade, so far so good.

Second piece split on the weld in about 3 placed while I was flattening and drawing out, can only assume I worked too cold.

 

If I do the math on the steel, time and charcoal, I'll have to finish and sell that little knife for a princely sum:lol:

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...