Jump to content
Joshua States

New project-States/Weller collaboration

Recommended Posts

I started a little 3-bar project recently. This is a different situation for me, because I do not have a finished product in mind. I typically create a full scale drawing of what I am going to make and then proceed to build it. This is more of an organic project, as I am thinking along the lines of something I saw in the link in this thread

 

I started with a 1/2" round bar of wrought iron that I reduced to about 3/8" square. Added a bar of wrought iron/15n20 twist. Then I reduced a short 1" round of W1 down to 3/8' square.

The three bars, next tp the blade shape template.

2 Three bars & Template V2.jpg

 

I surface ground the mating faces.

3 Three bars surfaced V2.jpg

 

And tack welded them for forge welding. I left the iron bar long so I would remember which bar was the spine.

4 Ready to weld V2.jpg

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's good sometimes not to be restricted by a plan. Going for no ricasso? I think a lack of ricasso opens all kinds of possibilities. 

 

Hope you've had a swell solstice!

Best o' luck! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh there's a plan, just not a very well defined one...….you are correct, this is a no ricasso blade.

Solstice was great. Hope yours was too.

Edited by Joshua States

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I had to watch Rudolf with Liz, and now I can post the next round of photos. This was today's forging.

I got those bars welded. The result is about 12 inches long (all 3 bars), 1 inch wide and about 1/4" thick.

 

5 Welded V 2.jpg

 

I roughed in the profile and bevels, & marked the cut for the tang piece.

 

6 Tang cut V2.jpg

 

Finished forging. I still have a little chunk left over for something else. Maybe a puukko sized blade.

 

7 As-forged V2.jpg

 

It's about 5.75" blade length and 11" oal. 1.25" wide and still pretty stout on the spine.

Edited by Joshua States
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks great Josh. I am excited to see what you create. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got one in the works that looks pretty much identical, same pattern, but scaled down about 4/5ths the size. Looking good! 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright... So I think I'm going to make 2020 my official year to learn how to make something like this (even without a power hammer).

 

Very cool, I can't wait to see the pattern. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Adam Weller said:

Alright... So I think I'm going to make 2020 my official year to learn how to make something like this (even without a power hammer).

 

Very cool, I can't wait to see the pattern. 

The hardest part of making this without a power hammer or press is probably welding up the twist billet. Luckily enough, you do not need a lot of layers for this. I think this twist has 13 layers, but it may be less, like 7 or so. That is fairly easy to accomplish by hand. The welding of the three bars by hand isn't too difficult either. There's a great video in the Arctic Fire 2016 set with Dave Stephens showing the method.

 

You might get to see the pattern in person some day. It depends on how things turn out...…...:ph34r:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Joshua States said:

You might get to see the pattern in person some day. It depends on how things turn out...…...:ph34r:

 

That was my first thought when you said you didn’t have a plan... I will remain hopeful, but no pressure :D

 

Thanks for the link, I’ve watched all the arctic fire videos multiple times, but I’ll watch that one again before I attempt. 

 

 

Edited by Adam Weller
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another option could be to start with real thin and narrow stock for your 7-12 layer(ish) stack. You can weld in sections if needed. Would definitely practice on mild steel first, then maybe a scrap of HC. I wish I had done this with my last 2 stacks. Best o' luck all!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Minor progress this afternoon. I forged out a little one from that leftover bit.

Little one V2.jpg

 

I also added a little length to the first one's tang in case a through-tang handle comes into play.

Forged pair (1) V2.jpg

 

A little surfacing and rough grinding. They are now in the HT oven prepping for hardening and tempering.

 

Rough ground pair (3) V2.jpg

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I annealed the blades.

Annealed (2) V2.jpg

 

The pattern was clearly visible. I may have misremembered the layer count. This looks like 17 to me.

Annealed (1) V2.jpg

 

Today I went for quenching and tempering.

Man, that wrought lets out some vicious slag at high heat.

Hardened (2) V2.jpg

 

I first thought I had a bunch of stress cracks along the edge. (as-quenched edge hardness laughed at my 64HRC chisel though)

The tempering and wire wheel clean up showed nice clean steel. Still some slag staining, but that should grind out (hopefully anyway)

Tempered (5) V2.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are going to look sharp!  (no pun intended, Josh!)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice!  And now I know what wrought will do in an oven, which is handy. B)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The layer of twisted WI and 15N20 is looking mighty nice.  Hurry up and finish this already.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol::D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bravo! Nice shape and good welds too. Looking forward to more progress 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Rob Toneguzzo said:

Bravo! Nice shape and good welds too. Looking forward to more progress 

And so here it is.

After grinding to 220 on the belt, I drew back the tangs.

Tang Treatment V2.jpg

 

Then it's on to setting the shoulders. I decided to cut these for all four shoulders. Fitting a triangle tang is a bear to get tight. The 4-shoulder method gives me a little play.

During one operation, the tang sliced the 2x72 belt, got jammed between the work rest and the platen and nearly took the top joint of my pinky off.

Good thing I keep super glue around...…..

It also put a small chip/crack in the edge. I had to grind that out.

Pinky V2.jpg

 

Finish sanding to 400 grit and two 5-minute etch cycles in FeCl. Add maker's marks.

 

Etched (1) V2.jpg

Etched (2) V2.jpg

 

That wrought iron spine let out a few voids in the etch.

I think I  will leave them alone. (even the one in my maker's mark)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are both nice looking, Josh.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Chris Christenberry said:

Those are both nice looking, Josh.

Agreed!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonderful looking blades Josh.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/25/2019 at 9:11 PM, Joshua States said:

Man, that wrought lets out some vicious slag at high heat.

Beautiful work,Joshua.I especially like that texture,before final grind(i know it'd not be the most practical finish for a knife:)!

But yeah,great looking puukot!

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...