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Tristan T

Sarqit forge

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just got this sarqit forge for christmas and it is coming some time in january. any idea if it will be adequate for heat treating? im worried about placement of the burn hole and the lack of a cylindrical interior. the chamber is 3 inch by 1 1/8 inch by 9 inch. i will either be using a propane t burner or a bernzomatic propane torch.

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I'd turn that over and get the burner hole on the top so it doesn't put the flame directly on the blade. The only way to know if it gets hot enough for hardening, is to put a piece of tool steel in there and watch for decalesence/recalesence. 

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I second Joshua's advice to turn the forge over so that the flame comes in from the top.  I would also recommend that you build a propane burner that feeds off a 10# refillable tank.  If not you are going to find yourself having to stop what you're doing to switch tanks and you will end up with stacks of empty tanks all over your shop.

 

Doug

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Not to be rude, but couldn't you have just made this?  There's no more then an hour's work in this and required no special skill or tools.

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6 hours ago, Gerald Boggs said:

Not to be rude, but couldn't you have just made this?  There's no more then an hour's work in this and required no special skill or tools.

i've attempted two forges. A plaster of paris and sand one which i learned half way through doesn't work and a two brick forge which i was able to get half the knife up to non magnetic but not the other half. My mom got tired and just bought me this. eventually i will build an ammo can forge with a t burner and hard firebrick instead of soft firebrick bc i can get it much easier and cheaper.

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If you do go for the ammo can, use kaowool, not brick.  Much more efficient.

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Hard firebrick doesn't insulate well at all, making it a challenge to get up to working temperatures and inefficient.  Just because they are easily available doesn't mean it is a good choice.  You should have learned that from your plaster/sand refractory adventure.  The configuration of your forge should also match your burner outlet to get a good spread of heat.  I recommend more research.

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I agree with the prior posts... I'm rebuilding my forge at the moment and for the 100 bucks your mom is spending on that forge you could get kaowool/satanite/IR coating to make an efficient forge. Hard brick is a heat sink, not a great insulator. Ammo can seems like another bad choice because its a rectangle and you want the inside to be round so it lets the heat swirl. Old propane/freon bottles, even metal paint cans are better options. Just some thoughts.

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2 hours ago, Adam Weller said:

I agree with the prior posts... I'm rebuilding my forge at the moment and for the 100 bucks your mom is spending on that forge you could get kaowool/satanite/IR coating to make an efficient forge. Hard brick is a heat sink, not a great insulator. Ammo can seems like another bad choice because its a rectangle and you want the inside to be round so it lets the heat swirl. Old propane/freon bottles, even metal paint cans are better options. Just some thoughts.

OK, but i don't think you understand. My mom has already bought this. Before i use it and void being able to return it i wanted to ask people if it will function. I don't care how efficient it is i just care if it will work. I don't need to forge with it i just need it to get hot enough to heat treat. I've given up on making a forge until i'm more experienced and i have this forge right in front of me. So i don't want to know if there are better options, i just want to know, will this function?

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With the right burner, I'm not confident that a bernzomatic propane torch is quite enough, I dont see why it wouldn't get hot enough to heat treat in.  I think what everyone is trying to say is that there are better options available for the same price or even less.  Roughly where are you located?  A couple of hours working with someone who has built a forge or two would go a long way for you. 

Edited by Alex Middleton

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Yeah, if you can return it, it might be a good idea. 

 

With propane you gotta pay to play, or you need to put hard work and research into building one. Most of us probably have more time than $. You have satanite, kaowool, satanite (maybe Mizzou too), a burner, and lines, and reg which can all together easily cost over $200, a propane tank, which I think is $20 to fill a 30lb tank which will constantly need filled. I switched to a 100lb tank for that reason. Around $65 to get those filled $150 for the whole deal. 

 

I'm not saying that to discourage, and maybe I've been using the wrong supplier, but the stuff isnt cheap. 

 

Your forge will likely work ok for heat treating. 

 

If you have a stack of old bricks (maybe 8), a long funnel, a hair dryer and 2 minutes you could make a very functional charcoal forge on the ground. Add a decent blower and you're welding. $10 a bag of royal oak charcoal from Walmart. Rearrange those bricks and you have a smelting furnace. 

 

Edited by Zeb Camper

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Check out the Build a Gas Forge and the Ribbon Burner attachments on the Forge Supplies page at www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com.

Let me know if I can help you.

 

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2 hours ago, Zeb Camper said:

Yeah, if you can return it, it might be a good idea. 

 

With propane you gotta pay to play, or you need to put hard work and research into building one. Most of us probably have more time than $. You have satanite, kaowool, satanite (maybe Mizzou too), a burner, and lines, and reg which can all together easily cost over $200, a propane tank, which I think is $20 to fill a 30lb tank which will constantly need filled. I switched to a 100lb tank for that reason. Around $65 to get those filled $150 for the whole deal. 

 

I'm not saying that to discourage, and maybe I've been using the wrong supplier, but the stuff isnt cheap. 

 

Your forge will likely work ok for heat treating. 

 

If you have a stack of old bricks (maybe 8), a long funnel, a hair dryer and 2 minutes you could make a very functional charcoal forge on the ground. Add a decent blower and you're welding. $10 a bag of royal oak charcoal from Walmart. Rearrange those bricks and you have a smelting furnace. 

 

Thank you! most help i've received so far. I've been needing someone to tell me other cheaper options instead of telling me to drop a ton of money on a very new hobby. i was going to originally build a charcoal forge but didn't want to deal with lighting it multiple times for normalizing processes. if this mini forge doesn't work i will just go to charcoal and take apart the mini forge for future larger forges. Again, thank you!

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1 hour ago, Tristan T said:

 I've been needing someone to tell me other cheaper options instead of telling me to drop a ton of money on a very new hobby. i was going to originally build a charcoal forge but didn't want to deal with lighting it multiple times for normalizing processes. if this mini forge doesn't work i will just go to charcoal and take apart the mini forge for future larger forges. Again, thank you!

 

You're quite welcome. I started out in a campfire and adapted from there until I discovered the internet. Look at Japanese style forges, and European or "viking" style forges. See what you can do with what you have. I need to make a topic on this subject. And you dont need to light it more than once. Normalization goes down all at once. One cycle after the other. You'd waste more fuel shutting it on an off than you would keeping a steady heat. 

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12 hours ago, Tristan T said:

. i was going to originally build a charcoal forge but didn't want to deal with lighting it multiple times for normalizing processes.

 

You wont need to light it multiple times for normalizing. Get it going, do three normalization cycles back to back, and quench. Same process as with coal or propane. 

 

I'm a hardcore charcoal advocate. If you have access to firewood, you can make your own charcoal, and if you have land to cut your own wood, it's basically free fuel, just requires your time. Check out the threads here on the forum for charcoal retorts if you are interested. Theres also the ancient process of using a charcoal mound, but I dont think many people use that process anymore. 

 

 

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Apologies, I got stuck on the gas idea and didn't even think about charcoal.  Tunnel vision is a curse... :rolleyes:  Yes, all you need is a shallow hole in the ground (or a raised facsimile thereof) and a way to get air into it.  And lump charcoal chopped into 1" chunks.  A hair dryer duct taped to a 1" black iron pipe with that setup will allow you to forge, heat-treat, and even weld.  It's messier and less convenient than propane, but I use coal most of the time so I can't complain about that! :lol:  Charcoal was the fuel of choice for ironworking for nearly 3000 years, and it still works fine. 

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Now that we have come around to the charcoal forge/hole in the ground idea...…….

Take that forge and bury it (hole on the bottom), stick a pipe in that hole in the brick for air flow, hook up the blower, and go buy a bag of charcoal and a 16 pound sledge hammer.(unless you already have an anvil, then forget the sledge hammer)

Fill the forge thing with charcoal and light it up.

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