Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I just stumbled across this old  german movie of the forging  and grinding

of an agricultural tool(don't know the english term.)

 

The old guys are very skilled and the workshop is fenomenal,  so I guess people on this forum would love to see this one too.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VK5QwqXW_BY&t=925s

 

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love movies like this. Those old shops, set on the river bank. Everything is water powered. Those power hammers are wild and the grinding wheel? Holy jamole.

BTW- It's a Hoe that he's making. (Google translate is your friend!):D

Edited by Joshua States

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah,  ''Hoe'' that was the word I was looking for:D

 

I love how casual he steps over the giant grinding wheel.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, that grinder.  All I kept thinking while he was using it was "Mein yarbles!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want that shop!  The bank of hammers with different dies, the grinding wheels, the whole place!  Plus the striker looked like my grandfather.  

 

Seriously though, the variable speed on a water-powered hammer?  Too cool!  And the grinding rests working from the knees.  I remember Owen Bush experimenting with those on a low belt grinder a few years ago. The leverage and control was great, but it's too easy to bog down an electric motor that way.  That's where that 8-foot sandstone flywheel comes in handy, you're not going to stop that thing once it's up to speed.  I just wish they'd used sound recording, it was 1963 after all.  :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That shop is blacksmith heaven.

 

Thanks for sharing this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Pieter-Paul Derks said:

I love how casual he steps over the giant grinding wheel.

Yeah. While it is still moving.

 

5 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

I want that shop!  The bank of hammers with different dies, the grinding wheels, the whole place! 

When he moved to the planishing hammer with the big flat dies, there was this steady stream of water flowing down onto the workpiece. Awesome!

The different forges set up at different stations too. I loved the part where he picks up what looks like a dustpan full of burning coal, walks across the room and lights up the second forge.

I think it was because it was by the special "finishing anvil".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoyed the video.  But as someone who owned a large industrial facility, I couldn't help but think what OSHA would have to say about that forge!?  #@%$:ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe if they had lots of employees like the kids we are raising today.

 

I saw two older gentlemen who knew exactly what they were doing. OSHA has no business in a shop like that. :wacko: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OSHA has no business anywhere near me.  #$@%^&!#$%@  (I feel so much better now!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you really like that grindstone, here's a 48-minute video (with sound, in German) about how they made them: 

 

These same guys have a BUNCH of smithing videos and other "old ways" videos.  I'm glad they filmed these old guys before it was too late.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And a short-ish one on knife grinding in Solingen.  More big water-powered wheels and fearless guys stepping over rotating equipment, this time with loose belts!  But do check out the continued use of the knee boards to add pressure.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really enjoyed that grindstone video.  Couldn't quit watching it.  Sure wish it had been translated.  My shoulders and back hurt just from watching.  Whew, what a feat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was awesome.

 

I would've cried if it had split. :wacko: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The scene at my house watching the quarry video:

 

Me: <Silent, eyes glued to the TV, mouth slightly open, slight hint of drool forming at the right corner of my mouth>

My Wife: <Walking onto the room> "Why are you watching an old black and white film in German?  Oh God!  You're not going to start making big stone wheels, are you?"

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost verbatim to what happened here! :lol:

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great videos. What kind of rock where they making the grinding wheels from?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Doug Adams said:

Great videos. What kind of rock where they making the grinding wheels from?

 

A very fine grained sandstone.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

A very fine grained sandstone.  

Did they ever make those in the U.S. ?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

29 minutes ago, Doug Adams said:

Did they ever make those in the U.S. ?

 

I honestly don't know.  Millstones, yes.  Whetstones, yes.  Big grinding wheel stones, probably, but I don't have any proof.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I had a minute to check, and here are two places in the U.S.:

 

https://ohiohistorycentral.org/w/Grindstones

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grindstone_City_Historic_District

 

I know there's a lot of nice sandstone in Kentucky and Middle Tennessee, but I haven't yet found anything about using it for grindstones.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder how long those grindstones lasted. The video I posted shows several that look like they are waiting to be finished. One would last me a lifetime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...