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Gerhard Gerber

Monkey on my back

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To add to the fight I've been having with myself, I saw a FB post by David Baker about stopping smoking, a bum knee and getting fat.....and not wanting to be the old fat guy on FiF:lol:

 

I quit smoking 8 November 2011 after about 17 years of at least 40 a day :ph34r:

I have a bum Achilles tendon and I'm fat and unfit, 50/50 blame to the tendon and knife making.

......and I've been smoking again for about 2 months :(

 

It's been a rough couple of years on many fronts, but things are looking up and I was firmly planning on putting down the tobacco 1st January, but obviously that didn't happen.

It was a terrible fight over a few years to quit the first time, now I have to do it again.....  

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1 hour ago, Gerhard Gerber said:

To add to the fight I've been having with myself, I saw a FB post by David Baker about stopping smoking, a bum knee and getting fat.....and not wanting to be the old fat guy on FiF:lol:

 

I quit smoking 8 November 2011 after about 17 years of at least 40 a day :ph34r:

I have a bum Achilles tendon and I'm fat and unfit, 50/50 blame to the tendon and knife making.

......and I've been smoking again for about 2 months :(

 

It's been a rough couple of years on many fronts, but things are looking up and I was firmly planning on putting down the tobacco 1st January, but obviously that didn't happen.

It was a terrible fight over a few years to quit the first time, now I have to do it again.....  

I smoked from the time I was about 6 years old till I was 47 and tried numerous time to "give up"!!! and always failed after some time. I finally figured out about 20 years ago that it was because I was a smoker  trying to give up something I was used to doing so I changed my thinking and became a "non smoker" and it became a whole different thought process. A smoker who has stopped is still a smoker who wants a smoke while a non smoker may want a smoke but being a NON SMOKER, it is not something you do. 

Different mindset and this can change your outlook on the habit and your response to those short periods of want as the nicotine leaves the body.

I was almost annoyed at how easy the different decision made leaving tobacco behind with no alternate gum patches or other crutch being needed or necessary.

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What can I say except....I know.

I finally quit thanks to Allan Carr's book getting my mind right, slight help from electronic acupuncture. 

 

I became tame over the years and would take a drag at a party once in a blue moon, caught myself out late last year thanks to regular visits (blacksmithing and beers)  from a neighbour.

 

Not smoking at work, and that's something I could never have managed first round.......gives me some hope that I can put down the poison arrows soon

 

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I'm in recovery (from what's my business and it really doesn't matter, addiction is addiction).  When you're using whatever you're addicted to you practice those habits that support your addiction.  When you stop your addiction  you have to form habits that support recovery and you practice those habits every day.  Remember, new playmates and new play pens.  You don't need to be around smoke filled rooms where someone is going to offer you a smoke out of a sense of courtesy.

 

Doug (just sayin')

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I know.

2011 was a complete turn-around in my life, became a teetoller, ate good food and exercised, I was in really good shape.

Funny thing happened one Monday morning just after 8am at work, started feeling funny which turned out to be the start of a week in ICU with a heart that refused to beat.

Severe bradycardia caused by an abscess at a dental implant that poisoned my whole body much more effectively with the hugely improved blood circulation, a huge thing when you quit smoking......

Shortly after this the company I worked for and wanted to buy out, lost a major contract and we couldn't keep the doors opened.

Life happens.

Spare you the details, but since then everything from weight, fitness, carreer to drinking and eating habits have been on a see-saw.

 

2 hours ago, Doug Lester said:

  Remember, new playmates and new play pens.  You don't need to be around smoke filled rooms where someone is going to offer you a smoke out of a sense of courtesy.

 

Night clubs and bars are in the past, neighbour Mike is another matter.  Him smoking is not the problem, my weakness is. He doesn't offer, I ask.  He's older than me by about 10 years, mid 50's, and surprise-surprise he wants to quit as well.

But you speak the truth, you need to remove yourself from temptation for a very long time, or forever, in order to succeed.

Mike is an interesting guy, I enjoy working with him although he's lead me down a few rabbit holes, but his regular visits over a few beers, along with my weakness, is the reason why I'm where I'm at now.....

 

I believe part of smoking cigarettes is the knowledge you're killing yourself slowly

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I smoked a pipe for 30 years. Stopped last August. 

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Addiction.  Terrible thing.  Uphill battle that the addicted really doesn't want to travel.  Everyone is right in that you have to no longer be of the addicted mindset to beat it.  I quit smoking in 1976.  I'd only smoked for 27 years................but was finishing 3 packs a day at the time.  Quit "cold turkey" because my wife (at the time) and I were planning a major backpack trip in the mountains of Banff National Park in Canada and I was worried about the additional weight and space all the cigs would take up in our packs.  She smoked 2 packs and I  3 packs a day.  We were going to be on the trail for 8 days, so that meant carrying 40 packs of cigs.  (where in God's name were we going to put them?????) We were already cutting labels out of our clothing, shortening handles on tooth brushes, etc., etc., etc. to cut the weight down on our packs.  It was (obviously) enough of an incentive that we both quit.

 

Fast forward to 2010.  Alcohol !!!  Was starting to drink a fair amount when I met my present wife.  Every time we got together we drank, and drank and drank.  Then after we married, we started taking long camping vacations.  Nothing like sitting around a cozy campfire with a drink in your hand.  (Ah-h-h-h, the life)  Time started flying by and I realized on Christmas Eve 2018 that I'd had my last drink.  Couldn't get her to quit.  I decided I was no longer a "drinker"............she wasn't ready.  So she'd still have a glass of wine when we went out for dinner.  But she's finally slowed to a stop.  We did share a bottle of Pennsylvania Dutch Egg-nog on Christmas Eve this year, but it made me sick to my stomach.  I guess a year without so much as a drop of liquor across my lips made the stuff poison to me.  Do I miss killing a bottle of Crown Royal Vanilla every week on Friday and Saturday nights?  Hell yes.  But a "non-drinker" doesn't drink.  Still...............................;)

 

I fully understand addition.  I don't tell addicts it's easy to change their behavior............heck, I've been there.  But once they make that decision, all they can do it to put one foot in front of the other and climb out of it.

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I really have nothing to add, but have an understanding of the struggle after 27+ years of smoking the 'wacky tobacky'.  

All I can say is good luck, my brother, and stay strong.  Many thoughts and prayers are with you.

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It always helps me to remember when I walk past the liquor isle that that stuff will kill me and it will probably be ugly.  I already have some liver problems.

 

As far a smoking goes, besides the Big C, I've known two people who have gone blind behind their smoking and one man who lost both of his legs.  I also knew one man who had to have stents put in his lower legs to save them.  Be self centered, stop smoking for yourself.

 

Doug

Edited by Doug Lester

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Ive smoked for 6 years now(since i met my wife) :P. Its horrible but ive noticed i slow down a heck of alot when im doing something. Anything really. Especially while forging. A pack in a normal day an half or less if forging or working on the yard ect... Alcohol. well thats another beast. Ive been drinking everyday for over 10years. Granted ive slowed down a bit since i have hobbies and a family. I know the struggle. I mostly use to pick on smokers because they just couldnt stop but now i understand. More than anything it may not help stop smoking but if you keep your hands busy it will slow you down. I dabble in electronics and i cant smoke at all while soldering, sometimes for hours. I cant do the double smoke lol.

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I feel your pain. I smoked for 40 years and tried many times to quit. I finally quit about 8 years ago and started dipping snuff. I quit the snuff last year and haven't looked back and don't miss it now. What's my secret? What new habit did I pick up?

 

Matches.

 

I chew matches. I realized it's a habit and I just needed something to occupy my time. So I keep a box of matches in my pocket and when I need one I strike it to get the Smokey flavor and start chewing. It's something to do instead of tobacco. B) 

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Randy, the abrasives in wooden matches will wear  your teeth down prematurely.  Just sayin' ! ;)

 

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Maybe, but that's better than the alternatives to using tobacco. I'm already fighting that. Going for another treatment Monday.

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Id suggest smoked sunflower seeds as a replacement. I know several ppl that have quit that way.

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Not easy to stop smoking. I smoked heavily for 20+ years. Tomorrow always seemed a much better day to stop.

 

I had my hand forced on stopping when we started trying for a family, which was not a smooth journey. Our daughter is 4 now, and Ive not smoked for 5 years. Dont feel any urge to nowdays, even around smoking and drinking bladesmiths!

 

I am quite reliant on my vape, but I suspect it is habit rather than nicotine addiction. I might pack that in this year. 

 

A year or so after I stopped smoking, I collapsed and cracked my head on the back of the loo. (it transpired I fainted, I fell asleep on the sofa with my legs up, then went to the loo half asleep :rolleyes:) I got blue light ambulanced into 'ER' full ECG, bloods done etc etc. It was very frightening at the time. The doc asked me if I smoked, and right at that second I was very glad to be able to say I did not.

 

I looked at all the other people in there with suspected heart attacks, mostly guys in their 50's, partners nipping out for a cig every 20 mins. Knew I had made a good decision to stop, it bought the reality of the warnings printed on every pack home.

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I know some pretty nasty awful people that hack their lungs up every morning and constantly fight over cigarettes like they're in prison, my mom was a drunk and a smoker who pretty much abandoned the rest of our family because she felt bad about her habits. My dads girlfriend is constantly talking about getting rid of pets because my dad can't afford food for them, which is a damn lie because he buys her smokes and coffee and all kinds of homeopathic B.S. A bag of nice cat food is $12 and lasts a little over a week, a pack of smokes is $6-8 and goes in two days. my dad used to say "all the good cats sing for their food" and all his girlfriend does is b&@:; and complain when she needs smokes because she's a habitual goblin. 

 

His last girlfriend quit smoking, not really because she just switched to gum, and was constantly chewing with her mouth open like a short little cow. It's not quitting if you switch to something else, then you chew packs of gum a day and you have the same habit.

 

On on the more extreme side of things, I know a few crack heads because a friend of mine lets them do yard work, and they can be okay. But they can also bring prostitutes into your house and get into fights with them when you live in a co-op with 14 other people  and it's the night of the week when everyone eats dinner together and they have guests. 

 

Its money, it's time, it's disgusting to people who don't do it. I don't want to kiss a woman with an ash tray in her mouth or be in the car while she's smoking. 

 

My my secret to not smoking is unnaturally nasty people, cranky and dehydrated because they drank all their coffee and they think someone took their smokes.

 

you would need a smoke to deal with a shitty smoker, a drink to deal with a drunk, and some of the things I've heard from crack heads.... "They switched out the inner tube in my bike tire and put in a dirty one"

 

People absolutely will jump off a bridge just because everyone else is doing it.

 

As for the wacky tobacky, the new stuff is green crack, absolutely not what it used to be. You can get over that stuff in a few days but you will be bored/frustrated for a while and you will want some if it's around.

 

Whenever i I have a little extra money I eat as much as I can, I try to keep away from junk food and cook lots of meaty hearty meals, I also just went camping for ten days with a friend at his ranch, I made a little grill out of old farm trash and cooked beans and rice with some vegetables and pork, went to sleep full and woke up with frost on the tent. I found an 80 pound Quartz Boulder and dragged it a half mile to the camp to use it as a chair. That's how you get over stuff, my friend ate a beetle.

 

I can imagine him saying, wing flapping in his teeth, "things with sugar in them don't taste good because they taste good, they taste good because sugar tastes good" so you could wonder, are tobacco and alcohol actually good, or does something else make you like them?

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Best to get hooked on good highs. Gratification from hard work, friendships, endorphins from exercise, satisfaction from goals met, purpose in routines, hobbies and I play little mind games with myself all the time.

 

You can get addicted to making good choices as well as bad ones! 

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Amen to that, Zeb.

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7 hours ago, Zeb Camper said:

Best to get hooked on good highs. Gratification from hard work, friendships, endorphins from exercise, satisfaction from goals met, purpose in routines, hobbies and I play little mind games with myself all the time.

 

You can get addicted to making good choices as well as bad ones! 

 

Yeah, but it if was easy, everyone would be doing it.

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Apply the same determination to letting go of bad habits as you do to becoming a better bladesmith

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There's a saying in my language that doesn't translate well, but basically a problem shared is a problem halved.

 

During out last hike we were slogging up a mountain when my cousin, same age but much fitter turned to me and said "for an alcoholic you sure can climb a mountain!":lol:

The smoking thing happened for one reason, beer :ph34r: 

Standard advice on hikes here is to take at least 500ml whiskey/brandy/vodka pick your poison, which we did, but I was literally dreaming about beer.  Tried non-alcoholic but even my dad feels he would rather drink water. 

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I dont really see much problem letting loose once in a while. As long as you're not heaving your guts up and waking up in a puddle! I think when you find yourself drinking more than two or three beers per night ALONE though, that's probably alcoholism. Self control is key. I lacked that from age 18-21 lol. 

I know a girl that calls carona lite  "the finest sparkling water". Shes right! 

 

I always say it starts with a single decision, and the first 2 weeks is hardest. It takes about two weeks to form a good habit. I actually for the past 3 years or so have took up running during the warm months and continuing to diet in the winter. But every spring it's a test of will power for about two weeks, and then i find it hard to stop when the days become too short and it's too cold. 

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So this thread is definitely crossing over into my “other life” - I debated posting this but maybe this will help someone quit smoking. I spend most of my day looking at the insides of people. I can spot a smoker within seconds of pulling up the pictures. Their lungs are full of holes. Of course this is multifactorial so there are a ton of caveats here; however, from my perspective it is consistent. Here are two pictures I pulled. This isn’t the extreme trophy case you see in textbooks, I see much worse on a daily basis. These are just regular people, both in their 60s.
 

(Btw - this is a CT scan, your looking at axial slices of the right lung - basically if you sliced a person like a loaf of bread. Air is black, fat and muscle are various shades of gray, bone is white)


431C1F51-D024-43BC-BF57-D7CF3411A0EF.jpeg


8B3974BE-DB17-471D-B9E5-CA9D7138167F.jpeg
 

Not great images, as a result of taking a picture of a screen, but I think the message is clear...

 

Notice all those black holes in the first picture, that is lung destruction, oxygen exchange can no longer take place in those spots. The second image is an example of more normal lung tissue, same age. 

Edited by Adam Weller
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Adam, does this improve after a person quits?

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9 minutes ago, Randy Griffin said:

Adam, does this improve after a person quits?

 

First off - It is never to late to quit smoking.

 

To answer your question: yes and no...

 

Smoking causes all kinds of problems: inflammation of the lung tissues, thicker mucous production, decreased ciliary movement (the little hairs that help bring stuff back up out of the lungs). These things have been shown to repair themselves after you quit, not to mention the general decrease in Carbon Monoxide taking place of oxygen molecules in the blood...

 

There are all kinds of other problems smoking causes. Increased cardiovascular risk (Heart attack), decreased tissue repair (like healing after surgery or a injury), and lung cancer risk... These things also improve when you quit smoking. 

 

 Unfortunately, the lung destruction I showed in the pictures up there do not. Those holes will stay, and that part of the lung cannot exchange oxygen anymore. 

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