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Monkey on my back


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14 hours ago, Randy Griffin said:

Adam, does this improve after a person quits?

 

EVERYTHING improves when you quit.

Not sure if that's a good thing, but my libido went through the roof :lol:

Biggest change for me was a relief from skin conditions.

 

Knowing all this I find it even more unbelievable I started again....

 

14 hours ago, Adam Weller said:

 

First off - It is never to late to quit smoking.

 

To answer your question: yes and no...

 

Smoking causes all kinds of problems: inflammation of the lung tissues, thicker mucous production, decreased ciliary movement (the little hairs that help bring stuff back up out of the lungs). These things have been shown to repair themselves after you quit, not to mention the general decrease in Carbon Monoxide taking place of oxygen molecules in the blood...

 

 

 

My dad's been struggling with heart issues the last few months, first got a stent and most recently had ablation done.

Not like I don't have an example of what not to do and the consequences..... :(

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Gerhard, it took me two tries to finally quit for good. Both times were unplanned and began while sick in bed for a few days, not smoking at all. I figured, hey, three days without a smoke - why not take advantage of this head start in the process and just stop altogether?

 

The single most helpful thing I found was to replace the smoking with something positive. In my case it was an exercise program.

 

Can't say I don't sometimes miss a smoke. My wife smokes, but only a couple of cigarettes after dinner. I just don't have the ability to do that - I know that for me, one or two would escalate quickly to a pack a day.

 

Good luck

Saludos

J

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16 hours ago, JDWare said:

The single most helpful thing I found was to replace the smoking with something positive. In my case it was an exercise program.

 

That's why  I mentioned my Achilles tendon issue, between what happened at work, working halfday and making knives for the rest, I descended into a world of not sleeping properly, sitting for 5 hours follow by standing the the shop for 3-4 hours, breathing in shit.

Next was a shower followed by beer(s)

Thanks to the tendon even if I could make myself take the dog for a walk, I'd be cripple by the end of that.

Halfday half pay, so LCHF (expensive) went out the window and started shoveling carb comfort food in my face.

 

I'm not smoking during working hours which is not something I could do before, but I know this will change if I leave it too long.

 

I found the root cause for the tendon issue a few weeks ago, it's steadily improving so I'm hopeful.

Also put my foot down this weekend and resumed the diet I know works, cutting back on the beer and I feel a lot better already, no energy dips during the day.

 

It has helped packing out here, to realize again many are fighting the same fight and winning, sad to get all the good advice I know already and finding myself back in the fight anyway.

Give the demon a name so you can fight it.

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On ‎1‎/‎15‎/‎2020 at 4:33 AM, Alan Longmire said:

Sometimes you just have to decide you're a bigger, badder son of a bitch than the demon.  

I'd modify this only by saying "realize" instead of decide....

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There's a lot of alcohol addiction in my family history.  I honestly understand what it takes to beat it..........................most aren't able to.  I found myself drinking far too much (maybe not by some people's standards but it seemed too much to me)  I finally looked at the glass recycling tub and realized how many "empties" of Crown Royal there were in it.............and how I'd be embarrassed for anyone to see that.  I hadn't been feeling good, so I decided "my liver is arguing with me over the booze" and stopped cold turkey.  That was Christmas Eve 2018.  Had some Egg Nog this Christmas Eve and it made me kind of sick to my stomach.  That was a true sign it was over.  Sometimes you just have to admit and then do something about it.  Is it easy?  Do I point fingers at those who can't quit?  Nope.  Everyone has their demons.........everyone.  Might not be booze.  Might be addicted to work.  Heck, an addiction is an addiction.  Every individual just has to make up their mind they are going too do something about it...............no-one else can do that for them.  Good for you if you've beat an addiction.  May God Bless you if you still have one you need to beat.  My 2 cents worth.

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I realized, like 9 years ago, to stop smoking I need to cut out the booze.

So I had my last beer on Tuesday, and the bag of rolling tobacco will be empty today, guess I can get 2 or 3 more rollies out of there and then it's over....

Had to reach Friday because my colleagues are feeling special needs again and my tolerance for laziness and stupidity evaporated a few years ago already :P

 

I know it takes 2-3 weeks to get over the cravings completely, so I guess it's Sober February rather than Sober October, it will suck :lol:  

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  • 7 months later...

How wrong can you be....

 

So a lot has happened since 24 January, I believe after this failed attempt I gave up and started smoking at work, which opened  the flood gates.

 

I did okay during the first lockdown our side, boiled eggs for  (late) breakfast, intermittent fasting, and walking the dog after work. then the extension....

Lost the plot completely, comfort eating, booze smuggling, smoking like a chimney.....got nice & fat, not sure but I think I turned north of 150Kg.

 

Beginning of August I signed up with a friend that does something similar to crossfit (only not a fashion show) as a part of his karate club.
That means I've been in varying degrees of pain for a month and 10 days now, after the second session I was unable to take off my shirt, but this has all improved over time.

I realized very quickly the smoking is not helping, my next mythical target data for quitting  was November, "9 years off, 1 year on, the off forever".......knowing full well I was BS'ing myself

So I went on Spring Day, 1st September, for an IQS treament, same treatment that finally worked for me in 2011.......10 days & counting......

 

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Good luck my friend.  That is one evil I have never had to fight, but only because so many people I know were fighting it that I learned to stay away.

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I'm finding out what this "core" thing is that so many people talk about, currently it's AKA the middle part that hurts.

 

Surprising development, told my Dad I'd quit (again) and offered to pay for his treatment, and he told me today he wants to give it a try...... 

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It will never be easy.....

I realized the previous occasion I quit that smoking (and many other vices) are like a drawn out suicide, I guess same can be said for lack of exercise.

I don't have kids that might take care of me in my old age, and the government I'd have paid tax to my whole life to that point give us the equivalent of US$60 per month, and the collection of pension funds at employers through the years is largely a joke, so there's no retirement on the horizon.
I'm not overly bitter about this because I believe this will be a return to normal, old people sitting around being utterly unproductive for 20 years is just not sustainable anymore.
 

Ideally if I don't win the lotto soon I wouldn't want to make it much past 60, which raises the question why quit smoking, why exercise?

 

Exercise so I can forge better, quit smoking to not aggravate the allergies I already struggle with.

So 2 weeks in all I can say is if it wasn't for the snot I'd still be smoking :wacko: 

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  • 2 months later...

Been a while.........what a rollercoaster.

I had a slight household accident that left me with a not so slight concussion, meaning about 5 weeks of headaches and no exercise.

I was still eating like a champion to make up for not smoking, and without much effort I picked up another 10kg, meaning the average bathroom scale could no longer handle me.......

About 2 weeks back into exercising, slowly loosing that weight, not back where I started yet but in the mean time I've gotten much stronger and fitter, some parts of my body are probably stronger now than they have ever been.

 

Had a few seriously tempting moments with the cigarettes but held out so far, and the good news is so has my Dad.

The change in him has been quite spectacular, his mind is clearer, biggest change is his calves thanks to returning blood circulation.

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Right on!  Keep up the good effort. Thanks for sharing a positive outcome of the effort.

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Good work on staying off the smokes! - Ive been 100% quit for over 5 years, Just started having the occasional one though :huh:  (crappy work circumstances is my excuse) - might be one, or max two a week when I am with smokers, and I quite enjoy them sometimes.

 

If I have more than one cig in a day, I just feel a bit dirty, and don't get any enjoyment from the 2nd. This backs up my recollection as a heavy full time smoker, that I only got any benefit from the 1st one of the day. The rest were just habit.  Hopefully I am just an ex smoker now, who has the odd cig. time will tell!

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One year and three months smoke-free, still miss it in the shop.  But I don't have heart palpitations anymore either.  There was probably as much nicotine in one bowl of the stuff I was smoking as there is in a whole pack of cigs, though.  An added bonus is the extra $500/year I'm not spending on tobacco...

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Smoked my first cig at four....no joke lol. Me and my great-grandma would wait till my mom went to sleep and she'd roll up some Prince Albert! So of course I got the habit as I got older. Then flash forward, I'm about 28 or so, and this crap just got too expensive! So I walked around for about month ready to kill everyone, then I wanted to kill everyone on every other day. It was a struggle but then I realized I had went a year without the a puff! I had stayed smoke free for nearly 15 years, and then started working for the department of disabilities! I told my fiance, I can either smoke or drink, pick one! But instead, I started vaping. It settled my nerves, I never coughed, never got out of breath and I kept my senses of smell and taste. These days I make my own juice, coils and so forth, so I always know exactly what I'm inhaling. I know its a habit, but its one that I have the most control over and I know that you could toss a stogie in my face and I'd turn it down. I highly recommend it for anyone who wants to quit.

 

The only time anyone ever complained was when my fiance and I were going to a Predators game, she curled up her nose, rolled down the window and asked me what I was vaping. I told her it was a honey-cured tobacco blend I was experimenting with. Turns out, the honey flavoring smells a lot like cat pee to some people lol!!! Now I just stick to fruity flavorings

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We quit using IQS, I believe the system is of Dutch origin, and that's how I quit back in 2011, but got much better info this time round.

I was under the impression the electronic acupuncture suppresses the cravings, but it's actually stimulation a dopamine release to counter-act the drop in dopamine levels when you quit.  I reckon it makes quitting as easy as it can be, you just have to want to.

 

John - if I could keep it at 1 a day I would smoke, 100%

Alan - well done, keep it up, I'm sure you've experienced all the physical benefits by now.

Brian - All I can say is thank heavens I'm too old and missed that vaping shit-show completely, it happened during my 9 years as a non-smoker, and I almost died coughing the one time I tried.
Have to say though, watching a friend's son fiddle with and put a new coil in etc etc.......that would so have been me if I was younger!  

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Congrats to everyone who has been able to completely shake of any habit that none of us really need!  

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I smoked 1-2 packs a day for 22 years,  quit 9 years ago in may. I am not going back though I miss it still and my health has tanked since I quit, my asthma came back hard I developed eczema, and several other autoimmune based disorders, I also contracted Lyme a year after quitting and that messed me up a ton so not all from quitting.  

 

I am happy I don't smoke any more , happy i am a non smoker. I wish I was able to smoke, I don't want to be controlled . I know the min I pick up a cig and light it I'll be back to two packs a day but wish I could just have one with out that risk.. 

MP

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