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Rob Toneguzzo

Wood carving Hook Knife

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I set out to the forge this morning with a puukko in my head but changed my mind at the last minute to a wood carving hook knife. I have been watching videos of kuksa and spoon making and want to give this a go and if possible without power tools and it seems I needed a hook knife.

 

I used a small piece of leaf spring for this and forged it as thin as I could with the blade geometry being flat on the inside with one beveled edge on the outside.

 

I am sorry I did not get pics of the forging but I roughly forged to shape and finished with a file and sandpaper.

 

I then carefully bent the blade over a medium sized hammer head (seemed about the right diameter) which I clamped in the vice.

 

This blade is very thin esp at the tip and I did not want to overheat it so I turned my forge right down and carefully heated it and did my 3 normalising cycles before the oil quench.

 

I fully expected it to warp twist to some extent or crack but it held true and Survived.
 

The scale along the edge blew off in the quench and when I did a file test with a small rat file it skated nicely (it took a few strokes as expected to get rid of a bit of decarb on the fine edge before it skated.

 

Anyhow it is in the first temper cycle at the moment. I may end up taking the tip back a bit later but thought it was better to make it longer than too short.

 

If anyone else has made one of these or carved a kuksa or spoon I would love to see your work too.

 

As always any comments, feedback critique etc appreciated 

 

 

 

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Awesome! I love greenwood carving. I have yet to carve a Kuksa that hasn’t cracked though.

 

I want to make a hook knife someday.   Great work. 

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Beautiful work, Rob.  I'd think a hook knife would be a real booger to forge.  You did a good job of it.  As a carver, I can tell you,  those hook knives take a whole different approach to carving.  (sharpening too!)  :D

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5 minutes ago, Chris Christenberry said:

Beautiful work, Rob.  I'd think a hook knife would be a real booger to forge.  You did a good job of it.  As a carver, I can tell you,  those hook knives take a whole different approach to carving.  (sharpening too!)  :D


Thanks Chris, I have been pondering about the sharpening of it.

 

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Well, Rob, I can only think of one word.  TEDIOUS! :D  Really it's not all that hard. It's just not straight forward like a knife or axe.  Get yourself a 1" dowel rod.......say about 12" long and take a piece of wet/dry sandpaper and wrap the dowel with it.  Start sharpening.  Start at whatever grit you think appropriate and work through as many grits as your can get your hands on.  Most DIY stores will carry up to 1200, but you can order on-line grits so fine you won't even think they are doing anything.  Those are measured in microns.  I've got a paper that will absolutely mirror polish a handplane blade's bevel.  After you get it sharp, then you take another dowel and and glue some leather on it to use as a strop.  Oh, and one thing I forgot to mention.  Wood carving blades are sharpened the opposite direction of meat cutting blades.  You PULL the edge away from the sharpening or stropping surface.  With meat cutting knives, you sharpen INTO the sharpening medium............and then away from the edge on the strop.  Have fun.  I sharpen blades for a fee.   Hook knives are triple priced. :lol:

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Thanks for the info Chris, much appreciated. I think I will need a big gouge too.

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I’ll post a photo of one I did over the summer below. I’ve only carved two spoons since finishing it. But it carved nice and seems to retain its edge well. 

If I were you I would cut the point off of the one you forged. I started with a Mora hook knife that had that sharp tip. The only thing the tip was good for was puncturing the user. 

 

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Really nice blade, Jonathan.

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7 hours ago, Jonathanbradshaw said:

If I were you I would cut the point off of the one you forged. I started with a Mora hook knife that had that sharp tip. The only thing the tip was good for was puncturing the user. 

 

 

Hey Nice work Johnathan and I will take your advice and take the point off as it has already got me 3 times.

 

Here it is finished. Wood is Australian Ironwood from my yard. I cut one down about 3 years ago and seasoned it in my shed. Great for tool handles.


The wet season has kicked in well and truly. Here is a pic of my yard and after 5 minutes of downpour 

 

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Edited by Rob Toneguzzo
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Looks like a good wet, and a good reason to stay inside usin that cool blade................B)

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Yup, that's exactly what wood carving is for! ;)

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I know this is not as easy as you just made it look, excellent result! B)

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