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Industrial forging as art cinema


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Just watch it.  Shot at Firth Rixson Forgings ltd. in Sheffield.  No dialogue.  No explanations.  Just great machine forging and two almighty steam hammers, plus a few smaller ones.  

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I was in there on Friday! :) - I found the floor plate with ''barry can't arf weld' on it! The big drop stamps are Massey 8 - 10 - 12 ton, the counterblow is a biggie, a Beche DG40. One of my best customers, I do a heck of a lot of work on the stamps.

Edited by John N
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I strongly suspected you knew exactly who that was and where. B)  That 12-ton drop is no joke, but the counterblow boggles my little mind.  :blink:  That's a serious bit of forging equipment I had never seen.  Is that steam, pneumatic, hydraulic, or a combo, and how does the counterblow action work?   Seems like it would be difficult to balance?  

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The Dg40 in there is an interesting one. Its was made by English steel company just before ww2. There was a smaller Beche that they copied. It was the only hammer in the UK that was big enough to forge the crank for the Rolls Royce 'Merlin' engine, which was a major contributory factor to success in the 'battle of Britain' which swung the war. (knock off hammer :rolleyes:)

 

The bottom 'tup' on the '40' is about 60 ton, the top about 45. The 2 tups are connected by steel bands over rollers. The top tup is pushed down by compressed air, pulling the bottom tup up via the bands. The top moves further distance (hence more speed) than the bottom, but the bottom is heavier so the 'energy' in each piece is the same - thus = harmony on the work piece. On the later 'DGH' hammers the top and bottom tups are hydraulically coupled (hence the 'H') - the motive force is still squashed air.

 

The '40' refers to 40,000 kilogram meters of energy.

 

One of my customers in the UK is putting in a Beche 65 - Im looking forward to seeing that, it will be a beast. The 40 is pretty humbling. I love it.

 

 

Edited by John N
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The forging being done in the opening sequence of the film is a massive pipe clamp (all these went to the states), the set of gears in the second shot is the back of a 1000 ton+ 'Toledo' trimming press. (might be a 1500 ton?)

 

Edited by John N
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6 hours ago, Doug Adams said:

What is that stuff that looks like sand they are throwing on it and what does it do?

Its sawdust. It stops the forging sticking in the dies.

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So, you're saying that is the very hammer that forged all the Merlin cranks for every Spitfire, Lancaster, and Mosquito?  First, wow!  Second, that's a heck of a lot of cranks!  Even going 24/7 that's pretty impressive!  That thing belongs in a museum if it ever gets retired.  

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  • 3 weeks later...

 ''barry can't arf weld',  First Awesome !  Second,  Lol.   Everybody should see this vid.  Humbling indeed.  Thanks for posting Alan...

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