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Conner Michaux

Bushcraft-ish wip

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Sadly my pipe is not closed at one end.. I usually try my best to block up the end with coal though.   Im going to try that melted table salt idea Joshua posted to try and heat treat correctly. I think he mentioned W2 to qualify for that.

Of course I will try to spot decalescence, but I haven't had much luck.

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You absolutely have to block off one end of the pipe or it doesn't do anything about oxidation.  A plug of dirt is fine.  As long as air can't flow through it, that's all you need.  

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Alright thanks Alan, I’ll try to plug it up with dirt and as best I can.

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Im still waiting to get the pin holes drilled, right now the only access I have to a drill press is someone who lives across the road and he wont be in town until Saturday.. Time to hurry up and wait i guess. :mellow: I might go ahead and heat treat it, I need to get some carbide bits though.  is this what Im looking for? https://www.homedepot.com/p/Bosch-1-4-in-Carbide-Tipped-Drill-Bit-for-Drilling-Natural-Stone-Granite-Slate-Ceramic-and-Glass-Tiles-NS300/301426417

Edited by Conner Michaux

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And we have quench success!   Skated a file super easy.   I think I may have gotten a Hamon, but I’m not sure. Gonna pop it into the over at 400.

883053B4-455E-4A64-8D8C-D5BC53483423.jpeg

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You could have used a regular drill, these holes don't need to be perfectly square like those on the scales. Anyway, congrats on the quench ^_^

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My hand drill is not quite powerful enough to drill through even annealed steel, but I only edge quenched it so it  should be some what soft.  I hope..

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Looks to have hardened on back into the handle some. That's just how it looks to me. Your drill might be too fast. See if you can drop the speed down and increase pressure. Use a sharp bit and dont let it bind up and spin you around. Good luck! 

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I might have quenched the entire thing too quickly... now that I think about it I was using a headlight so it might have looked totally cooled down but was still somewhat red. Oh well, we will figure out soon.

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3 hours ago, Conner Michaux said:

I might have quenched the entire thing too quickly... now that I think about it I was using a headlight so it might have looked totally cooled down but was still somewhat red. Oh well, we will figure out soon.

Can you spot anneal where you want o drill pin holes for the handle. I always drill holes before HT and only have to run the bit through after HT to get rid of the scale 

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I probably will, can’t afford any carbide bits right now so that’s my best option. 

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It's easy (relatively) with W2.  Polish it up a bit, or at least get the scale off the tang. Wrap the blade in a wet cloth or stand it in a can of water so it's submerged up to where the handle starts, then hit it with a torch until the temper colors run all the way out past blue into gray, up to a low red glow if you can get it that hot.  Let cool slowly.  Drill holes.  

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I haven't got a torch, so I will wrap up the blade in a wet cloth and continue to keep it wet while putting the tang into the forge thats really my only option. That will also allow me to straighten the warp in the tang.

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That works too, just keep an eye (or a bare finger) on the blade to make sure it doesn't get too hot.

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Also, if you get worried about heating the blade unintentionally, you can get a little more control by heating another chunk of metal in the forge, then touching it to the tang.  

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Thanks for the info. :)

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That very thought just occurred to me, I came here to post it, and boom!  Jerrod beat me to it! :lol:

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I forgot what the recommended tempering time is, I had it in the oven at 400 last night for an 1 hour and 15 minutes, and I just put in in for it’s second cycle. I’m thinking maybe 4 hours? 

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Two one-hour cycles is fine. 

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Tempered and pin holes drilled. I’ll move onto handsanding later this afternoon. I drilled some extra holes for weight loss too. 

5EAC6B7A-4EBB-4C8D-9CD9-3CEB1E728566.jpeg

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Well... this is just annoying. Why do I keep trying to make things go faster with the grinder!!!  At least it’s just aesthetic and it won’t effect the performance. :D I’ll buff the plunge lines so that I blend the slip on the grinder with the plunge, so it doesn’t look as ugly.

9CD09595-3674-49F4-9BD1-F70793396F57.jpeg

  • Sad 1

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I tore up and tossed plenty of blades earlier on. This one isn't too far gone, but it'd take a little while to get it right. I'd suggest you spend a little more time with paper. It might stink, but you wouldnt regret it after it was all done. 

 

also, it looks rounded off on the handle part. It's gonna be worth it to get that perfectly flat. If you would care to gouge out a rough fuller in the middle of the handle for weight reduction and epoxy strength, it would also make it easier to hand sand the outer perimeter perfectly flat for good fit to the scales. Might have more control with and angle grinder for fullering. It needs only be 1/32" deep to keep off the paper. A piece of marble or angle iron would work well for a sanding backer when flattening. 

 

Looking good!

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It’s just the light making it look like that, it’s very flat.   I’ve got a lot more sanding to do anyway. It it’s a deep gouge. I’ve learned my lesson on that one so I know what to not do next time. 

I’m happy it’s not a critical failure! 

 

Ill pull out the angle grinder and make a fuller In the tang, it’s gonna need some weight taken off 

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And we’ve got a Hamon!  I popped it into the ferric for a few minutes to see if there was anything, it’s very subtle but it’s definitely there, gonna take a lot of work to bring it out I assume... At this point I think you all can guess that there is going to be an endless stream of questions about to happen. I’ll get pictures In here soon.

 

EDIT you probably can’t see it very well, but if I’m guessing correctly that’s a Hamon right? 

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A3DA9388-335A-45E2-9F33-08BC5E057520.jpeg

Edited by Conner Michaux

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I can't tell from the pics.  Try getting a shot with the blade reflecting a black t-shirt or something else dark,  that tends to show it better.

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