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Normalizing vs Spheroidizing 1095


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I have been trying to improve my heat treating process for 1095 and in reading this forum I saw some people recommend normalizing followed by spheroidizing. I'm I'm not mistaken spheroidizing means hardening then heating to almost critical and letting it cool slowly. My question is: does the spheroidizing have any affect on the finished blade as opposed to just normalizing then hardening? Or does it only serve to make the steel easier to grind, drill etc. The reason I ask is because I'm making a fairly long sword and I don't want to risk quenching it twice if I dont have to.  

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Don't worry about spheroidizing, normalizing is fine. From what I understand, spheroidizing is mostly an industrial process although it can be done if you have the proper setup. With a simple steel like 1095 normalizing will make it soft enough for grinding, filing, and drilling. If the blade is heat treated properly there won't be a difference in performance.

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37 minutes ago, D. Giagni said:

Don't worry about spheroidizing, normalizing is fine. From what I understand, spheroidizing is mostly an industrial process although it can be done if you have the proper setup. With a simple steel like 1095 normalizing will make it soft enough for grinding, filing, and drilling. If the blade is heat treated properly there won't be a difference in performance.

Thanks

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Yeah, speroidizing is only done if needed (like if you really have to drill a hole and the metal is just laughing at your drill bits).  A proper heat treat gets you good grain size, carbide dispersion (if applicable), and full conversion to martensite (or as close as the alloy will allow).  Or whatever structure you are going for, I guess.  If you are making a spring you want 100% bainite, but I digress.  Normalizing will get you the grain fineness you want, and carbide distribution isn't really an issue until you get strong carbide formers (like chrome, vanadium, etc.).  Good luck, and be sure to share your results!  

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