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I have huge respect for this young man's skill and deep appreciation for the videos they put out

https://youtu.be/smA0RsTV6EA

 

The reason I wanted to share this, apart from the obvious brilliance, is how he cleans up the plunges on this knife.

His whole method is strange to me, I take a blade to (maybe) 80%, then do the handle, then finish the lot in a few more uncoordinated steps :wacko:

Guess I cannot measure myself against a master smith, but I sure do aspire to do work at this levels someday....

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Great video. One of the things that really stuck out to me (that some folks may have missed) is the excellent demonstration of normalizing by watching for decalesence and recalesence. 

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As a fledgling to knife-making, I have say that was, to me, probably the most instructive video I've ever seen on the subject. 

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Amazing video... Makes it look so easy when I know it is not like that at all. I want all those tools :D though I was refreshed that I didn't see him use a mill to make the slots. 

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Yep, that was good.  You can see why he has his Mastersmith rating.  

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Amen to that!

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Do yourselves a favour and watch some of his other videos, his blued mild steel fittings with gold engraving is something to behold.

 

He's not shy about sharing his methods in detail, I've also learned a lot from the videos, but I find the accuracy to which he works a bit mind boggling.

 

The "museum fit" he does looks amazing, but I suspect it's much harder to achieve than he makes it look.... 

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I've been watching his videos.  His accuracy, as you call it, is indeed mind boggling.  He really knows what he is doing.

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There's nothing he does that cannot be achieved by anyone with the patience and determination to master the same level of control over the process.

Look at the techniques he uses, and mostly with hand tools. Superglue is his friend and partner. The guard is made from a 1/4 template so that it is a mirror image in length and width.

Every stage is a series of small steps. Scribe the line and grind to it. Bevel the edges and shoe-shine the radius, file the notches, cratex wheel them clean, buff like crazy in several steps.

The elevator is broken. Take the steps. Mastery is control over the process. It is focusing your intent, and imposing your will over the material, through a controlled process.

 

Do yourselves a favor and watch it again, but slow it down to half-speed.

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I could disagree with you based on that fact I lack so much machines and equipment that he uses, which is a lot, but the fact is if I follow his steps and make that exact knife it would be one of my best.

I can not achieve the same finish he does (what is a cratex wheel?), I would struggle severely to make it take-down, the line-up pins and the pommel nut being the major challenges.

Even eliminating those features it could be quite a nice knife..... 

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7 hours ago, Gerhard Gerber said:

I could disagree with you based on that fact I lack so much machines and equipment that he uses, which is a lot,

The machines make it easier, but it is still possible with hand tools or lesser machines. It just takes a little longer and more careful attention.

 

7 hours ago, Gerhard Gerber said:

the line-up pins and the pommel nut being the major challenges.

The pins are drilled into the spacer with a drill press. You can do the same with a hand drill. He uses the hand drill to match the pins holes to the handle material by using superglue to get the spacer attached to the handle in the correct place. He uses a metal lathe to turn the pommel nut. I have used a hand drill and my disc sander (or belt grinder) to achieve the same result. It just took longer and a lot more care. I have also used my drill press and a file.

 

7 hours ago, Gerhard Gerber said:

I can not achieve the same finish he does (what is a cratex wheel?)

Of course you can. Most of his finishing is done with hand sanding. He only shows a small portion of it (and in fast forward), but it took a lot of time, and very fine sandpaper. He does use a stationary buffer, but they also make buffing wheels for a hand drill or Dremel.

 

Cratex wheels are a rubberized abrasive medium meant to be used in a rotary tool. I use the small ones in my Dremel. They also make larger versions for use with a buffer or bench grinder. Either size can be mounted in a hand drill and used on the part clamped in a vice. Either the tool or the work piece needs to be securely held. Kyle uses Cratex wheels to polish the pommel nut while it is still in the lathe, and to polish the tight corners on the guard, and to polish various stages on what looks like a bench grinder.

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there are only two errors in knifemaking, too much material or too little material.

 

too much? keep grinding.

 

too little? toss the piece and try again.

 

 

(file guides are cheating)

 

 

 

 

:ph34r:

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2 hours ago, steven smith said:

(file guides are cheating)

 

 

 

 

:ph34r:

 

careful...:unsure:...;)!

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13 hours ago, steven smith said:

(file guides are cheating)

There's no such thing as cheating. ;)

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When attaching a piece of metal to scrap wood to use as a grip, using super glue, he also sprays the item. 
Anybody know what this is as haven’t seen such before?

Kind regards,

Gary LT 

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Cyanoacrylate activator.

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@Chris Christenberry, thanks Chris. I’ll add this to my glue supply!

 

Gary LT

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been watching Kyle Royer for a long time now, almost since i started. in my opinion, he is right up there alongside Walter Sorrels in terms of how much i have learnt from them.

 

 

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On 2/7/2020 at 3:47 PM, Joshua States said:

The machines make it easier, but it is still possible with hand tools or lesser machines. It just takes a little longer and more careful attention.

I'm loath to mention this, but for me that comes round to the "economics" of the matter.......being positive I'm hoping I can makes knives in the future that justifies that amount of time.

 

On 2/7/2020 at 3:47 PM, Joshua States said:

The pins are drilled into the spacer with a drill press. You can do the same with a hand drill. He uses the hand drill to match the pins holes to the handle material by using superglue to get the spacer attached to the handle in the correct place. He uses a metal lathe to turn the pommel nut. I have used a hand drill and my disc sander (or belt grinder) to achieve the same result. It just took longer and a lot more care. I have also used my drill press and a file.

My biggest problem is the pins, as mentioned in my slipjoint thread I only have 4mm brass, I can get 3.2mm brazing rods, and a friends might score some 1.6mm steel pins this week, no idea what steel.....and my drill press chuck can't hold 1.6mm drill bits :ph34r:

Challenges :lol:

 

But no fear, I'm learning a storing information and techniques. B)

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On 2/10/2020 at 1:18 AM, Gerhard Gerber said:

my drill press chuck can't hold 1.6mm drill bits

 

Could you use a simple pin vise (without handle or swivel) in the drill press for this?  Here are some from MSC that seem affordable.

 

8649194-24.jpg

Edited by Dan Hertzson
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On 2/10/2020 at 8:18 AM, Gerhard Gerber said:

I'm loath to mention this, but for me that comes round to the "economics" of the matter.......being positive I'm hoping I can makes knives in the future that justifies that amount of time.

 

My biggest problem is the pins, as mentioned in my slipjoint thread I only have 4mm brass, I can get 3.2mm brazing rods, and a friends might score some 1.6mm steel pins this week, no idea what steel.....and my drill press chuck can't hold 1.6mm drill bits :ph34r:

Challenges :lol:

 

But no fear, I'm learning a storing information and techniques. B)

 

Hey Gerhard

 

its funny, i just put up a short video on my instagram today about this. i too cant find pin stock. so i use arc welding rods. 2.5mm are someof the most common, take them to your anvil and gently hammer the flux off, clean with a bit of sand paper and you have a 2.5mm pin. thats what i use for my line up pins

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i think I could easily have (or gain) the skill, it's the patience to execute it that I lack.

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46 minutes ago, Don Wilwol said:

i think I could easily have (or gain) the skill, it's the patience to execute it that I lack.

 

I was told a long time ago that patience (or specifically the lack thereof) is why few young craftsmen are true masters, even if they've been doing it for a few years.  I am a lot more patient than I was when I started, but I'm still waiting to be patient enough... :rolleyes:  That's where hand tools are better than power tools for some things.  It's hard to be patient grinding a blade when you have the ability to blow through steel as fast as you press it to the belt.  

On 2/5/2020 at 12:52 PM, Adam Weller said:

I was refreshed that I didn't see him use a mill to make the slots. 

 

Me too.  

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3 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

 

I was told a long time ago that patience (or specifically the lack thereof) is why few young craftsmen are true masters, even if they've been doing it for a few years.  I am a lot more patient than I was when I started, but I'm still waiting to be patient enough... :rolleyes:  That's where hand tools are better than power tools for some things.  It's hard to be patient grinding a blade when you have the ability to blow through steel as fast as you press it to the belt.  

 

 

I started making knives semi seriously about a year ago, but at 62 and having built everything from custom rifles to condominium projects it's hard to really say I'm a true beginner. I'm not really sure if I can say I'm more patient than I used to be, but being slower surely does give the impression of patience. 

  • Haha 1

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