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What’s this measuring instrument?

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Saw Kyle Royer use this instrument he is sitting behind to measure and mark bits. Can someone here please tell me what it’s called? Thanks.

 

7B9D2C3A-AEAA-435D-AF0F-9B41103B20DB.jpeg

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Looks like a height gauge to me

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It's a height gauge.  They come in single or double column, vernier or dial.  They are not cheap.

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Thanks everyone 

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I used a home made one for years. I made it from scrap steel and a couple of carbide tipped teeth off a circular saw blade.

center scribe.jpg

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I have made three to suit the 3 standard thickness steels I use. Simple and effective and cost almost nothing. Sharpen a hard concrete nail and go from there.

IMG_20190602_105400.jpg

IMG_20190613_101632.jpgIMG_20190613_104914.jpgIMG_20190613_105948.jpg

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I have been thinking that something like this would be pretty useful for scribing center lines:

 

Center Scribe.JPG

 

It's similar to what Garry uses, but by simply twisting to catch both sides of the blade it will automatically align the scribe point up with the center line, regardless of the thickness of the stock.  A small sleeve of a given thickness could be placed over the pin on one side. It would then work to scribe the line a consistent distance off center to give something to grind/file up to before heat treat.

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One big difference between these home made ones and the actual height gauge in the video, is the use with a forged blade versus a piece of flat stock.

When you are starting with a piece of flat stock, profiled to shape, but no bevels yet, the simple small variety works fine. It's when you have already forged in your bevels and the distal taper, that the small center scribes fall short (no pun intended), as you move through the point.

 

With the larger height gauge variety, the blade is laid flat on a smooth surface, like a granite slab, and it does not fluctuate in reference to the tip of the gauge. With the smaller tools, as you move away from the ricasso area, you have less and less flat surface on the knife to rest on the flat of the tool. 

 

This is why I put mine on a piece of steel angle that is about 8 inches long and have a scribe at each end for doing both sides.

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2 hours ago, Joshua States said:

This is why I put mine on a piece of steel angle that is about 8 inches long and have a scribe at each end for doing both sides.

I'm curious what your scribing tool looks like, but I can't picture it in my head.  I've been trying to find a better way to scribe a center line on something that already has bevels and a distal taper, and as you point out, the simple offset tools don't do that very well.

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Brian, he posted a picture of it several posts back.

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Doh!  So he did.  Still not sure I get it though.  It's been a rough day, and my head is a bit thick this evening...

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He lays the knife blade on the angle iron's surface..........lowers the two square tubes (with the sawtooth teeth) down to the level he desires and can then scribe the blade from both directions.

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1 hour ago, Chris Christenberry said:

He lays the knife blade on the angle iron's surface..........lowers the two square tubes (with the sawtooth teeth) down to the level he desires and can then scribe the blade from both directions.

Pretty much that's it.

First, get the flats of the ricasso area smooth and parallel. No ricasso? Create a small one that you remove later. Measure this thickness with the calipers.

DSCN6382.JPG

Set the calipers for roughly half that thickness and lock them. I usually set them about .002 one side or the other from center.

This produces two lines and leaves about .004" between them to grind to.

DSCN6383.JPG

 

I set one square tube (leave the other one out) and scribe the center line with one side on the steel angle.

DSCN6384.JPG

 

Start at the ricasso and move to the tip.

DSCN6385.JPG

 

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Remove that pin, set the other one, flip the blade over and scribe from the other side.

BTW - the angle iron is only 7.25" long, but you can make it any length you like.

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Thanks Josh (do you prefer Joshua?)  You are using the ricasso as the datum surface.  That's the part I was missing.

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just try scribing a straight line on a forged blade with no ricasso, beveled tang, and a severe concave taper....

 

you might as well start grinding.

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