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Alex W.

I haven't tested it, but i think I've got a way to make 18 ingots instantly.

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As long as I can dislodge the divisor, and I believe I'll be able to, I'll have 18 ingots in a single pour.  If it isn't obvious already, anything ferrous is a very bad idea, but anything below oughta be a cinch.  I work at a rather large thrift store, and I arrange shelves for anything small on the sales floor, and I see these all the time, a dollar fifty easily keeps it on the shelves for at least a week, and I usually see them a bit higher, so they're almost always available.  Otherwise, expect around $20, apparently they're a TV product or something.  I will clarify, our thrift store gets a whole lot of donations, so I wouldn't be surprised if a pan like this isn't available all of the time as it is in our store, but still worth a look.

15819930099061147610153584455594.jpg

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I can't put my finger on it but off hand I'd say bad idea.  What are you intending to cast in them if I may ask?

 

Doug

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Might be fine for lead, but anything hotter will result in a huge mess.

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I'm pretty certain you'll just end up with a big ingot that has part of a brownie pan stuck to it.  (At best)

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21 hours ago, Doug Lester said:

I can't put my finger on it but off hand I'd say bad idea.  What are you intending to cast in them if I may ask?

All the home foundry enthusiasts online are extra careful over aiming their crucibles above their muffin tins as a way to make ingots, and I believe a single pour is a lot safer.  All that time extra carefully pouring aluminum or whatever into a dozen ingot molds opens a door to a mistake a lot wider than a single pour, a lot of injuries prevented.  

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13 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

I'm pretty certain you'll just end up with a big ingot that has part of a brownie pan stuck to it.  (At best)

I know a possibility exists, a very good one at that, but a method untested is a lost opportunity.  I believe a paint layer is enough of a barrier, even after burning, and only expanding of the aluminum is in the way.  Whether or not a layer of anything exists after a pour, or isn't able to remain during a pour remains to be seen.  

Edited by Alex W.

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14 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Might be fine for lead, but anything hotter will result in a huge mess.

A good prediction I hope is inaccurate, at least for aluminum. As long as a barrier exists between both the ingot and it's mold, I believe it's a high probability I will be able to knock out the ingots.   Also, doesn't aluminum experience shrinkage when it freezes? 

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The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.

Personally, I think this have a 50-50 chance, and although I'd love to see you succeed, I really wouldn't mind seeing this:

 

On 2/18/2020 at 6:05 AM, Brian Dougherty said:

a big ingot that has part of a brownie pan stuck to it.

 

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Might work, might not. The question in my mind is why would you want 18 rectangular pieces of ally or lead ?

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4 hours ago, John N said:

Might work, might not. The question in my mind is why would you want 18 rectangular pieces of ally or lead ?

All the home foundry enthusiasts online are extra careful over aiming their crucibles above about a bunch of muffin tins as a way to make ingots, and I believe a single pour is a lot safer.  All that time extra carefully pouring aluminum or whatever into a dozen ingot molds opens a door to a mistake a lot wider than a single pour, a lot of injuries prevented.  

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I think John's meaning was why make a bunch of ingots at all?  If you are melting metal you should be pouring castings.  Is your intent to have billets that you then machine or otherwise work?  In that case pouring a bunch of "ingots" makes sense.  If you are doing a casting and you pour more than one or two pigs (the proper industry term for leftover metal from pouring molds), then you have probably messed up quite a bit.  

 

Also pouring multiple smaller ingots is going to be a lot safer than one big one.  Spread out that thermal mass and get it cooling faster.  

 

I would suggest you not try to re-invent the process until you have done it a bit.  Do a tried and true method a couple times and you'll learn a lot about what is a concern, what isn't, and what you feel you need to improve the most for your situation.  

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2 hours ago, Jerrod Miller said:

I think John's meaning was why make a bunch of ingots at all?  If you are melting metal you should be pouring castings.  Is your intent to have billets that you then machine or otherwise work?  In that case pouring a bunch of "ingots" makes sense.  If you are doing a casting and you pour more than one or two pigs (the proper industry term for leftover metal from pouring molds), then you have probably messed up quite a bit.  

 

Also pouring multiple smaller ingots is going to be a lot safer than one big one.  Spread out that thermal mass and get it cooling faster.  

 

I would suggest you not try to re-invent the process until you have done it a bit.  Do a tried and true method a couple times and you'll learn a lot about what is a concern, what isn't, and what you feel you need to improve the most for your situation.  

I have a few totes of scrap I mean to put in a single tote, and I don't wanna fiddle around with a bunch of slag in the middle of a project, I'd rather use ingots.   

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Are you aware that you will still get slag when starting with ingots?  Far less, to be sure, just making sure you are aware.  Slag is pretty easy to deal with, so don't worry about that too much.  Consolidation is a completely valid reason to make ingots.  But I would suggest you make a sand mold for the making of the ingots.  This will also get you some practice at making a sand mold and/or a pattern.  Much safer and effective that way, too.  

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On 2/22/2020 at 9:44 PM, Jerrod Miller said:

Are you aware that you will still get slag when starting with ingots?  Far less, to be sure, just making sure you are aware.  Slag is pretty easy to deal with, so don't worry about that too much.  Consolidation is a completely valid reason to make ingots.  But I would suggest you make a sand mold for the making of the ingots.  This will also get you some practice at making a sand mold and/or a pattern.  Much safer and effective that way, too.  

I have used ingots a couple of times, and I understand exactly what you mean.  I might even be able to add an entire crucible of aluminum or whatever to a single ingot if i get a shape that won't allow anything to melt and drip out of the crucible, probably a somewhat shrunken crucible interior to account for expansion.  Smaller ingots would be a wise idea if I needed a smaller melt though.  Btw, is there anything wrong with a little sand ina melt, or is it gonna sink or float and get caught in a bit of slag?  I think that's why I didn't originally go with it in the first place.

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Anything in the melt, including sand, has the potential to end up in the final casting.  It is always best to use clean starting materials and clean melt practices.  If you wire brush castings (including pigs/ingots), monitor your slag, and pour carefully, then you should be just fine.  

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