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Conner Michaux

Sharpening with belts?

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I’m interested if you guys use belts to sharpen your blades or not, I can’t sharpen on stones for my life, so I use the wicked edge sharpening system, but the stones are expensive and I can’t afford the higher grits, so I was thinking maybe I can set the edge/secondary bevel or what ever you call it with my wicked edge and then progress up the grits with belts?  Maybe a stupid question to follow, why do you start low grit with belts and go up, when you can just start at 1000 and take a little bit more time to do it? I can’t afford many belts, so if I could just buy a few 800-2000 belts to sharpen rather than 400-2000 belts. So the high grit belts wear out if you do that? Sorry I can’t explain anything very well, so if you can understand I’d love some feedback 

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How about buying some self adhesive sandpaper to attach to the Wicked Edge stones? They come in various micron sizes up to 60,000 grit. I don't think you need anything close to that. :P

 

Here's the set I bought from Amazon:

 

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B07TDMS1H8/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

Just cut them to size and stick them to the stones. I have some 1/2" plate glass that I stick them to for sharpening chisels and plane blades.

Edited by Ron Benson

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You have no idea how much you just helped me, thank you so much. :D

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The one thing is, I have to get sandpaper starting at like 600 grit, that may be too thick and make a convex edge 

 

this might be a little bi more challenging than I thought. Those micron papers are super high grit. I have 200 and a 600 grit stone, I’m thinking I would have to get 220-400, then use the 600 stone and then progress up the grits from 800-2000 and then micron paste and lapping film. And if I have way to much extra time I’ll try to get it up to that 60,000 grit that was mentioned...   would my idea work? I think it will take a lot of trial and error, but it may be worth it for me. 

Edited by Conner Michaux

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You can buy rolls of self-stick wet-or-dry paper in 220-400-600up to 1200 at an auto parts store, 2"wide by 25 feet long.

I set the edge with 400 grit belts, then go to stones, then strop.  I think at anything over 2000 grit equivalent you're just polishing, not sharpening. For anything but woodworking tools you actually want a bit of toothiness to your edge.

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I like a well polished edge on my kitchen knives. When it begins to cut less, a few passes on a leather board brings it back to hair popping sharp. Tomatoes skin is no issue

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Do you think sharpening past say 1000 grit makes a difference? I have knives that are sharpened to 600 grit and I can't imagine a knife sharper than that. I've never gone past 600. Should I?

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if you want to shave or cut the endgrain of wood, which is close enough to shaving, you want a polished edge. 

maybe for cutting sushi you might want a more polished edge and if you made a scalpel it would have to be very very sharp.

a toothy edge will have a harder time just pushing through material and a polished one wont need any back and forth movement to cut.

 

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Here is a looong answer to is 1000 grit enough, but knowing where I am coming from will help understand my answer. If ya don't wanna read all this, skip to the bottom for the short answer. :P

 

My dad gave me my first pocket knife when I was six. It wasn't sharp, but he wanted me to carry it every day, (and I have carried one almost very day for over 66 years). As I got older, he taught me how to sharpen knives. Older still and I started hunting. When I started deer hunting with my Dad's hunt club, my Dad and I were the "official" knife sharpeners while others skinned and gutted deer. I always thought I was great at hand sharpening knives until several years ago when I stumbled across Japanese kitchen knives and joined a forum populated mostly by professional chefs that use knives daily in their jobs. What I learned was that what I considered sharp was just the starting point for them. (!!) For them, a sharp knife should be able to cut paper thin slices from a tomato without holding the tomato - just set it on the cutting board and slice parallel to the board. They normally go anywhere between 1000 and 12,000 grit depending on the person, the job, the knife steel and the blade geometry.

 

I am currently sharpening kitchen knives to 1.5K grit, but woodworking tools go to 8k grit and I am just starting to experiment with 14K grit.

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I like when my kitchen knife split my arm hair in two without even touching my skin. I just pass the edge 1/8" above my skin and my arm gets a hair cut :lol:. Then, the knife goes though about any food with scary ease.

Edited by Joël Mercier

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I grind edge up with 24 grit until I am paper thin at the edge.....with 24 grit it almost looks serrated.

Then 50 grit...then 300 trizac..then 100 then 45 the a30.

Then take the blade off my jig and freehand the blade on the slack part of the belt with the a30 edge down

You can watch the burl form …..after maybe 10 or so passes a side it goes to the buffer with green compound until the burl stops.

A 2 x 72 scotch brite and 2x 72 leather belt is on my to want list....maybe with my tax return. 

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2 hours ago, steven smith said:

a polished one wont need any back and forth movement to cut.

 

Many people who have attempted the 1" free-hanging manila rope challenge will dispute this.  For that you need a little sticky to keep the blade in contact with the rope long enough to cut it through.  Too much polish and the blade just slips by without cutting.

 

But we are comparing apples and oranges and bananas here.:lol:  A chef wants a different edge than a butcher, who wants a different edge than a woodworker, who wants a different edge than someone taking the ABS journeyman performance test.  Not to mention axes and swords...

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and I just want a sharp knife....:D

Edited by Conner Michaux

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1 hour ago, Joël Mercier said:

I like when my kitchen knife split my arm hair in two without even touching my skin. I just pass the edge 1/8" above my skin and my arm gets a hair cut :lol:. Then, the knife goes though about any food with scary ease.

 

I'll have to try this. I like sharp and the sharper the better.

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45 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

But we are comparing apples and oranges and bananas here.:lol:  A chef wants a different edge than a butcher, who wants a different edge than a woodworker, who wants a different edge than someone taking the ABS journeyman performance test.  Not to mention axes and swords...

 

I have to spend a lot of time explaining that statement when I'm teaching people how to sharpen wood carving tools in my class.  I usually get a lot of kickback/resistance from men.  (you know, men know everything about sharpening because they are the "hunter gatherer" in their clans.) :rolleyes:

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Ill be buying some adhesive sandpaper soon, we are going to see if this works. Doe anyone know if there is any adhesive rhynowet sandpaper? 

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You could always just buy a can of spray adhesive and use whatever paper you want. Just make sure it fits your requirements - are you going to wet sand?

Edited by Ron Benson

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I might wet the paper a little bit with windex, I don't know if that actually does anything though.  How do I get the paper off the stone once its worn out if i use spray adhesive? 

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Having just gotten to the spray adhesive thing myself, go to a fabric store or craft store that sells Cricut stuff and get a can of Krylon repositionable adhesive spray.  It's like Post-Its note glue, but stronger.  Peels right off, though.

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Yeah, the 3m stuff does not remove easily.  And I also wouldn't necessarily spray it on the stone, but since the idea here is to use the stones that came with your Wicked Edge system as a way to use other grits, you can always wrap the stones tightly in plastic wrap, then stick the paper to that.  And while you're doing that, pay close attention to the angles involved.  Eventually you'll be able to do it freehand on a stone, or on a piece of granite countertop with any grit paper you want on it.  When I do it with the granite I do not glue it down.  I tape one end and use oil or Windex.  Works great!  

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I don't know how well the psa paper will peel off a sharpening stone as I am using it on glass. I do know that Best Sharpening Stones sells the micron paper, and even sells it cut to size for your sharpener. I don't think they would sell it if it didn't work, but you might contact them to ask.

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