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Mystery project for 2020


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I'm endeavoring on a high-risk project for KITH this year, and wasn't going to do  WIP until I got over the hump.  However, buy then I'll be too lazy to go back and harvest a few months worth of photos to create a detailed post so I decided to just leave this here to irritate ya'll.

 

I had a cable/1084 san-mai billet that was way to wide and thin to do what I wanted.  I had to take a bit of it from 2" x3/16" to closer to 1" x 3/8".

 

More to come, but it's going to be a while.  Have some other things that need to get done...

 

 

IMG_20200307_100405751.jpg

Edited by Brian Dougherty
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I forsee a smallish blacksmiths knife that the handle is curved around to resemble vines. 

I need to get my arse in gear, parts for my heat treat oven are arriving this week. 

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This is something that I have never tried before, and my reason for picking this as my KITH project.  Believe it or not, I've never tried to forge a fuller, or beveled a blade that had a central fuller.  (I've always ground them)

 

I had to make the fullering tool today, but I got the fuller in and about 1/3 of the way through beveling before my propane tank started freezing up.

 

I still have a lot of forging to do.  Once the bevels are in I'll probably go back over the fuller lightly to even it out and smooth out any wonkiness I create in the process.  I need to draw the tang out a bit more and clean up the transition area as well.

 

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I see I was completely off on my guess. 

but damn if that isnt a fine start, I gotta swap out my breaker before I can get started, seems 15A breakers are the norm now and my Grinder and soon to be built heat treat oven require 20A breakers. 

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Posted (edited)

I have other projects I should be finishing, but am having a hard time staying away from this one, so I got quite a bit done today.

 

First it was back into the fire to try to get it forged to shape.  I recently swore off flux, and replaced the sacrificial kiln shelves on my forge floor with some nice clean ones.  I can't believe how nice it was to work on something without getting it covered with sticky molten flux residue every time it went back into the forge.

 

 IMG_20200315_125529333.jpg

 

I've been working hard lately to push myself to forge much closer to final shape than I had been.  Until now I have been taking "forge thick, grind thin" a little too literally.  The cable skin on this billet is quite thin so it is forcing me to get the blade forged pretty close if I want any of the cable pattern to show in the finished piece.

 

I've seen folks do much better, but this is pretty good for me:

 

IMG_20200315_141555987_HDR.jpg

 

Here is the other side:

 

IMG_20200315_141553136_HDR.jpg

 

Here is an edge shot just because I'm a little proud of myself:

 

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Finally, a shot showing off the cross section:

 

IMG_20200315_142543264.jpg

 

I was shocked how fast I could clean up the bevels and profile on this blade.  The old adage "5 minutes at the anvil can save you and hour at the grinder" turns out to be pretty accurate.  I had the blade profiled, and the bevels mostly cleaned up in about 10 minutes.  However this fuller sanding part sucked...

 

IMG_20200315_144942609_BURST000_COVER.jpg

 

I was all giddy at first because I was able to clean up the fuller to this point in about 5 minutes.  However after another hour of work I still have some sanding to do. 

 

This is far as I had the patience to take it today.  A little more sanding, and it will be ready to heat treat.  I did a quick dip in ferric to see where I was at.  It was only after that I remembered that this billet has a layer of 15N20 between the cable and the 1084, so this is really a go-mai blade.

 

IMG_20200315_172456283.jpg

 

Then I finally sat down to dinner.  I get strange cravings and just go with it. 

 

IMG_20200315_181448614.jpg

Edited by Brian Dougherty
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Sushi, Guinness, and a bratwurst is odd?  To whom? :huh: You should've used brown mustard, though.

 

The blade is looking great!

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  • 1 month later...
On 3/16/2020 at 6:15 AM, Alan Longmire said:

You should've used brown mustard, though.

He's from the Midwest, though:unsure:....I didn't know that mustard wasn't really yellow until I moved out of the Midwest 30-ish years ago....

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Long ago (30+ years) I had a girlfriend from near Milwaukee (later West Lafayette, IN) who introduced me to the culinary delights of the upper midwest, and by golly her brats used brown mustard!  Every once in a while I'll simmer a Johnsonville in Old Milwaukee, then grill it for old times' sake...

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11 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

the upper midwest

That's the key here. 

And I feel the need to point out that she was a cheese-head from Wis-kahn-sin :wacko:  (said the F.I.B. who grew up in the suburbs of Chicago....:P)

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Posted (edited)

@Alan Longmire  @billyO

 

I'll have you guys know that I go up 'Nort' and spend the first week of July in Sheboygan with family every year!  Come up and me me by the lake once :)

 

In all honesty, that was a hotdog  (wiener in Sheboyganeese), not a brat.  (I make my own brats BTW)  It was also a Dijon mustard, but some artisinal stuff I picked up that is a bit pale.

 

Edited by Brian Dougherty
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That's why I go up in July!  It's a nice balmy 72F by the lake.  It can be in the 90's though a mile or two inland.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just stopped in and I have to say, Brian this is looking fantastic!. It really makes me want to get those darn 6 knives done so I can get back to projects that are sitting around waiting for me to do.

 

Not to highjack or anything but I have to warn @Robert D.

On 3/14/2020 at 9:02 PM, Robert D. said:

I gotta swap out my breaker before I can get started, seems 15A breakers are the norm now and my Grinder and soon to be built heat treat oven require 20A breakers. 

This is inherently dangerous. 15A breakers require a minimum of 14GA wire. 20A breakers require a minimum of 12GA wire (thicker). Loading a 20A breaker on 14GA wire and attaching a 20A tool is a good way to burn your house down.

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  • 1 month later...

Well, I finally decided to get back to sanding this fuller.  It's a bit wonky, but will have to do.  It's not bad for a first go at a forged fuller.

 

The balde survived the quench just fine.  No warping at all which surprised me.  Here is a pic right after the first temper cycle:

IMG_20200614_133647032_HDR.jpg

 

Next I evened up the shoulders a bit since they were still as forged, and started fitting the wax version of the guard.  Investment casting has been on my to-do list for over 30 years.  I've dabbled a couple of times, but never really did it right.  KITH is giving me a chance to give it a good honest attempt.

 

IMG_20200614_150701228.jpg

 

 

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

I'm running out of time on this one, but managed to get over another hurdle yesterday.  My first ever bronze pour!  Admittedly, this part could have been pretty easily filed from a piece of bar stock, but the whole reason I do KITH is to learn how to do new things.

 

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15 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

Wait a minute...  you MADE a vacuum casting system? :blink:  Yowza!  

Have you seen what they charge for those things?  I already had a vacuum pump, and I have other means at my disposal for degassing the investment.

 

Actually, it was more complex than that.  I hired extra interns this summer at work because so many students lost their summer opportunities to the pandemic.  We have had some low level investment casting needs at work for a while, but I don't really want to deal with pouring metals in our building. I had one of the extra people weld up the vacuum box.  Then I bought the melting furnace and a few flasks myself.  Whenever we need to cast something for work, I'll just do it at home.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

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