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David Pessall

Tru-Oil question

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I'm finishing this knife handle with Tru-Oil. Currently 6 coats.  Used 0000 steel wool between coats after 24 hr dry time.  Today used 2000 grit sandpaper and another coat. Wood is crotch claro walnut.  Pores aren't filling in much.  Prior to Tru-Oil sanded to 800 grit. When will these pores ever fill to a nice gloss shine? I realize it takes a lot of coats...but figured it would be a lot closer by now. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I had the same issue with truoil on walnut. You're gonna have to wet sand more between coats. Take your time and clean it often to get a better view where it needs more sanding. 

Edited by Joël Mercier

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Take it easy, David.  It's been my experience that super slick and shiny wood carving knives have turned out to be my least favorite. Got to be able to hang onto the little buggers.  I only sand my wood carving knives to 600 grit and apply three coats of Tru-Oil (sanding in between) and hit it with 000 steel wool after the last coat.  Every time I loan out a knife that is super slick, I end up having to wrap a rubber band around it so the students can hang onto them.   You want to "feel" the knife in your hand and be able to control the rolling in your hand.  A semi-gloss finish does that nicely.

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Would you use a sealer 1st? I almost used the Birchwood Casey sealer prior. I have another handle in progress of same material. 

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No, I wouldn't, personally, David.  As I mentioned, I'm not in favor of slick wood carving knives.  Sand'em, Tru-Oil'em and steel wool'em............then a couple of thin layers of paste wax (maybe) for "purdy-ness" and that's it.  The wax soaks in and body oils do the rest.  After all, these are working tools, not collectable sheath knives.  Here's a picture of one of my personal knives, David.  Only "finish" is a thin coat of wax.

 

 

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What wax is recommended?

Thanx again

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Believe it or not, David, wax is wax!  Well, pretty much.  I've got several cans of wax in my cabinet for furniture treatment and each one is just a "little" different.  Wax, unrealized by most people, is not a truly protective surface.  It's used on furniture and floors to (temporarily) protect from scratches.  Water penetrates wax unless the wax is applied so heavily as to be too thick to be practical.  (for example, have you ever seen water rings on a table when  wet glass is allowed to sit on the waxed surface?)  What I use on my knives, though is a product called Feed-n-Wax.  Has a nice smooth feel and not a real hard surface.  After it dries and is buffed with a soft rag, there's just enough "tack" to be able to control the knife through the cuts.  That's just how I like a wood carving knife.  My customers/students seem to feel the same way.  Might not work for everyone, but it does for my "crowd". :D

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001BKQYGW?tag=duckduckgo-d-20&linkCode=osi&th=1&psc=1

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Thank you Chris! BTW your knife looks great!

 

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Thanks.  Some of my best knives were made by my Uncle Bob.....................and for the most part they'd win no beauty contests, but damn can they cut.  It's all about the steel, not the wood.  Just wish I knew what steel and heat treating and cryogenic treatments he used.  I had no idea I'd be making knives back when he was alive or I'd have been looking over his shoulder! :D

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Thinking I'm about done with these. Carving knife with 6 coats, skinning knife with 5. Final coat this morning.  

How long should I wait to put wax on? Will  Renaissance micro crystalline wax work? It's what I have in house.  If not I'll get something else today. Drying at 75 degrees and 29 percent humidity.  South facing room always stays warmer. 

 

Thanks again 

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If you have the patience, I'd recommend letting the aromatics escape the finish for about a minimum of 5 days.........if not longer.  Smell the handles.  If you can smell the finish, wait a while more.  Then put a coat of any kind of paste wax on them and call it "done".   Nice job on those two knives, David.

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I hate waiting...lol

Okay sounds good.  

Thanks again Chis

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Be glad you used Tru-Oil and not boiled linseed oil. ;) That needs at least a month before waxing.

 

Renaissance Wax works, but it's awfully expensive and rubs off very easily.  It was designed for conservation of objects that would not be touched, after all.  I use any good-quality car wax.  As it was explained to me years ago, "if it beads off water and bugs at 75mph, it's good enough for a knife handle."  Just don't use it on open-grained woods, it leaves little white spots in the grain.  For oak, ash, and other woods like that I make black wax, which is just ordinary wax blended with enough powdered carbon black to be, well, black.  In thin layers it's transparent, but in open grain where it builds up it's dark.  

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Bison wax works great, Alan, no need to go to the trouble of adding carbon black to a colorless wax.  Besides, it smells great!

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Any particular shade/colour Chris?

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Only comes in one color, Charles.    Made by Liberon, I think.  Do a search on it and you'll find it's readily available.

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That’s kinda why I asked. I looked on fleabay and it lists 15 different shades. Made by Liberon. Maybe we have more of a selection (that’d be a first).

 

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Why would anyone need to wax a Bison?

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1 hour ago, Brian Dougherty said:

Why would anyone need to wax a Bison?

Ever smelled a wet buffalo?  

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You guys are a hoot! :D

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2 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Ever smelled a wet buffalo?  

Ahh, so we're talkin' "Car wax" as opposed to "Bikini wax" then?  Makes more sense...

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For some reason I'm getting this mental picture of a bison in a bikini... Thanks guys.

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1 hour ago, Adam Weller said:

For some reason I'm getting this mental picture of a bison in a bikini... Thanks guys.

Hey now, leave my aunt Ethel out of this!

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Well they are done...Tru-Oil on all 3. Wax on just wood handles. 

 

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Those look nice, David.

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