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Gents, Asking for some help/ input.

A friend found an old buggy spring in a field he was plowing, gave it to me, (photo).

It doesn’t bend / break like wrought. It did weather like wrought and wasn’t rusted through as steel might.

 I cut a piece, took it to heat, quencher in water and it shattered with a mild hammer hit in the vise.

I’ve included a short video of sparking and a still photo. Hope the video will load!
Any guess on carbon and /or? I respect all opinions.

Thanks, 

Gary LT

 

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F0875697-9C64-4A8E-BEB5-6F941C980A87.jpeg

9202B08E-9513-44B5-88C6-CA5D204A6C89.jpeg

Edited by Gary LT
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Did you grind your thumb? Ouch!

 

Yes, looks to be shear steel. Fairly high carbon too. I would guess .75% +,-

Take a piece of 1075 (.75%) and compare the length of the sparks and the amount of bursts at the end. The shorter and more bursts, the more carbon. Then do the same with mild steel (.18%). You can see the difference with 1095, 1080, 1075, 1060, 1045, whatever you have. This will give you a rough idea. You could also try hardening a piece. 

 

I would save this for something special! Its probably 150 years old or more. 

 

Edit: I've now read the post... You say it doesn't break like wrought? Can you see fibrous type fraying when you break it? It looks like it has some of that from what I can see... One way to tell is with a polish and etch.  

Edited by Zeb Camper
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Zeb, thanks and appreciated.

It did not cut-bend-tear like wrought (and I have wrought on hand), although it weathered as wrought. But maximum thickness and s only 1/4”, I’ll try another section. Also, nails and hinge pins look hand hammered in a pyramid shape.

 

Yes....I ground my thumb.... no sparks, certainly low carbon!!!

GT

 

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Probably more carbon in your thumb than you'd think, just not enough iron to spark...:P

 

An etch will tell you for sure if it's shear steel, but I think it is. It doesn't have the fibrous break that wrought iron does because it's hard and just snaps off.  I wouldn't mind a pile of that stuff!

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Would they have made a spring out of wrought?  I would have thought a spring that thin with that much deflection would have required more carbon than wrought.

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Thanks Guys.

Brian, I felt the same way and didn’t think wrought would be used for a spring function. Even now the piece, as it i, has bounce and recoil. In trying to bend / break / tear, it simply snapped with lots of force applied.

I have two blade sections cut and work with these to see what happens.

Aside from etching, any other suggestions are welcome!! :rolleyes:

Regards, 

 

Gary LT

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8 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

Would they have made a spring out of wrought?  I would have thought a spring that thin with that much deflection would have required more carbon than wrought.

 

Not really wrought, but shear steel. So, carburized wrought. 

Edited by Zeb Camper
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