Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Heck Jeremy, someone stole parts of your shirt :D

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

Probably not the biggest but definitely one of my favorites. This was 6 years ago. Back in my bow fishing days. Just a big ol nasty carp!!!

IMG_20130618_121104.jpg

That’s a big carp Jeremy. They are in some of our river systems too. I have shot a few with my bow to but not as big.

3 hours ago, Daniel Jathof said:

I was afraid you'd leave him curved. Looks great! Have you made a handle on him yet? I'm curious to see the final work. It's an interesting experience, I didn't expect anything good to come out of that metal you used.

No handle yet Daniel. Hopefully this weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/13/2020 at 3:49 PM, Joël Mercier said:

As counter intuitive as it may be, hardness does not affect flexibility. 

 

For example, take two fillet knives in 1084 with the exact same geometry. The one at 56hrc will take the exact same force to bend at a certain angle than the one at 61. The harder one will even bend further before undergoing plastic deformation. But the harder one will also be more likely to snap while the softer one takes a kink. 

I doubt you. 

The statement "hardness does not affect flexibility" is proven untrue by the same example you gave. 

Hardness or "temper" and geometry go hand in hand when determining flexibility. Geometry is also more than just thickness, it is 3-dimensional.

Consider this: I take two identical pieces of 1/4" thick 1095 each measuring 2"x10" and another piece of 1095 1/4" thick measuring 4" by 24".

I quench them all at the same temperature and in the same oil at the same temp/time. Now temper one of the 2x10 pieces and the 4x24 piece at the same temp. The other piece of 2x10, I temper significantly higher. The 4x24 will be more able to bend and flex than the smaller 2x10 at the same "hardness". The other 2x10 will be significantly more flexible and able to bend than the "harder" one. 

 

It is neither geometry nor hardness that determines the "flexibility". It is a marriage of the two.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess we first should have defined what flexibility is. 

 

In term of steel flexibility, it is the force required to bend a piece of steel at a certain angle. The less force it takes, the more flexible the piece is. So it's got nothing to do with toughness. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Well it sure has given me something to think about. I am going to do some more experimenting with different steels however this latest knife seems to be what I was hoping for so I will stick with that blade geometry.

 

Once finished I will test my edge retention on 6 chickens as I can’t seem to catch any fish lately. I will debone and make them into rolled roasts (just learnt how to tie the Butchers Knot.

 

Here it is so far. I decided to use some brass bolsters and water buffalo horn. I chose to use the part of the horn with the groves as I thought it gives it a bit of character.


Still got a fair bit of finishing to go on handle and blade where glue squeezed out from bolster.

 

D670775E-97AB-4852-9D9E-E1BD7CB01C9A.jpeg

0E37C472-B4BC-46FE-AC71-5058B315F7C5.jpeg

Edited by Rob Toneguzzo
  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went out and caught 3 Barra. And kept a 66cm one for dinner. I also get to test my new knife.

70548431-B01B-4B51-A399-F0E2DF0877FD.jpeg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's one fine looking filet knife, Rob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Chris.

 

Well after the final test filleting the Barra I am calling this a great success for me.  It held it's edge very well and easily filleted the fish as well as skinning the fillet. It has the right amount of flex for me too and was great deboning chickens as I found the tip got right in when cutting through the wing, hip and leg joints.

 

As always I can see areas I can improve on but for a knife I intend to put to good use I am happy.

 

For those interested this knife was 1075. I forged as close as I could to final thickness and heat treated at just under 2mm and ground the bevels after.

 

Final thickness of 1.5mm at the handle tapering to the tip. I tempered at 220C for 3 x 1 hour cycles.

 

 

IMG_3490-2.jpg

IMG_3497-2.jpg

IMG_3506-2.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the design details.  One of these has been on my to-do list for a while now, and you've given me  a great starting point.

 

I've never eaten barramundi.  It looks like half tuna and half bass inside.  What can you compare it to that is a bit more internationally available?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/24/2020 at 9:28 PM, Brian Dougherty said:

Thanks for the design details.  One of these has been on my to-do list for a while now, and you've given me  a great starting point.

 

I've never eaten barramundi.  It looks like half tuna and half bass inside.  What can you compare it to that is a bit more internationally available?

Hi Brian,

Not sure what is best to compare it to as other than canned tuna and sardines the only fish i eat is if I am lucky enough to catch a local one. The flesh is very white and flakey when cooked. Perfect for crumb or batter.

Edited by Rob Toneguzzo
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great,Rob,you Got it,man!:)....Knife looks neat,and obviously works great,good work,sokmething this thin and flexy is a challenge just on it's own...Impressive!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RobToneguzzo,  That great flexing butter knife most likely has a hardness of about Rc. 45.  I've tested several old and newer ones and that's about where they test out.  Great flex as they are "spring tempered".  Not the best for super edge holding, but hey that's what butcher's steels are for. Many  butchers prefer a softer blade that will steel easily and the wire edge is what is doing the cutting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...