Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I've recently bought some w2 from njsb to try to find a better alternative to 1095. I am a newby having made about 70 knives mostly forged from 1095. I have forged 6 knifes from this w2 pretty much identical thin hunters full tang tapered both ways. Finished rough grinding stamped my makers mark before I took them to my stump to straighten I heated the tang to a red heat then put them in between two steel plates in my press to try straighting and held them till black . Then took them to my stump with a brass hammer and broke two tangs. Grain was very fine. The blade part of the knife was very tough not brittle at all. Is it possible for w2 to work harden like that. To me it evidently has but doesn't make sense. Where did I go wrong? thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The steel plates probably effectively quenched the tang; you may need to temper to blue or hot stamp your mark earlier in the process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Assuming you have Aldo's W2, it's even more shallow hardening than the 1095 you were using so I doubt it could harden much with steel plates, at least not very deep.  

 

After a proper normalization, you should be able to straighten your tangs cold in a vise. Cold forging is risky imo. 

 

Do you have photos?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

Assuming you have Aldo's W2, it's even more shallow hardening than the 1095 you were using so I doubt it could harden much with steel plates, at least not very deep.  

 

After a proper normalization, you should be able to straighten your tangs cold in a vise. Cold forging is risky imo. 

 

Do you have photos?

I actually wouldn't be surprised if there was some martensite formed, even in a shallow hardening steel. When you plasma cut mild steel, the heat flow from the cut edge into the body of the piece can be enough to harden the edges (I got impatient cleaning up the super-hard edges of plasma cut parts and decided to look at some samples). The same thing can happen with MIG welding, etc. With the plates being big heat sinks and the force of the press making a good thermal contact, I wouldn't be surprised if a thin piece hardened. I've had the same happen to old spring steel (composition like 5170) with just an anvil and hammer (also god fed up with drilling holes in hard steel, so did some metallography).

 

EDIT: Found the micrograph of that hardened mild steel. This is a cross section of the edge off of the plasma cutter.

50x_orig_plasma_edge.png

 

And this is from that spring steel normalized on the left, and after forging then air cooled on the right (pretty much hardened all the way through consisting of martensite and bainite)

50x.pngLarge Piece 50x.png

Edited by Aiden CC
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

W2 and 1095 will harden to a depth of about 3mm (if I recall correctly) and that is from all surfaces. So it doesn't surprise me that you may have hardened that W2 to the point of breaking it after what amounts to a plate quench.

 

What I question most is the order of steps in your process.

On 3/31/2020 at 10:46 AM, Ben Gillespie said:

Finished rough grinding stamped my makers mark before I took them to my stump to straighten

This is all mixed up. The straightening should come before or during the rough grind. You should spot heat the area for your stamp and stamp on a very flat anvil surface so as not to require any straightening after stamping. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Joshua States said:

W2 and 1095

I remember Alan mentioning 1/16", but I never tested it myself. 

 

Though it would make sense considering the steel's tendency to auto-hamon on thicker cross sections. 

Edited by Joël Mercier

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...