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JenniferP

Steeled Wrought iron hatchax. 1.75lbs head

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So, I was approached 2 different times with the question about having a video on "Ax or hatchet" forging..  I don't currently have a hatchet or Ax video out. 

It takes 6 hr to make either.. Kind of funny since one is bigger then the other.   Anyhow, I needed a new hatchax  as my old one was in need of a redress so decided to film it and see what I could come up with for a "Free" youtube video. 

here are the photos..  Oh, the reason I call it a Hatchax is because it is a very light head on a small boys ax handle..  they cut amazingly well and serve both well for light and medium heavy work.. a 3+" oak limb is normal with one swing.. 

Some super course/loose wrought iron..  Pretty cool in the photos because you can see how the grain of the wrought iron was sheared and moved and also where the grain is compressed and stretched.  This wrought iron was so loose that in order for it to stay together at all. I had to completely change how I would normally proceed and welded the eye first, then split the cutting edge back open to insert the steel..   the stuff was so back that there was no way it would stay together for a decent preform..  I had to shape it after the steel was welded in so the steel would hold it from shredding apart.  

Enough chit chat.. 

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Nice job,Jennifer,way to go.

Beautiful iron,i know not the easiest to work with but what gorgeous grain,love that...

What's it look like from the top?

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Indeed!  Looks almost like homemade iron.  I have a wagon tire like that, to make a decent hawk I have to refine it (cut, stack, and weld three times, drawing down to original size each time) to get it to hold. 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, jake pogrebinsky said:

Nice job,Jennifer,way to go.

Beautiful iron,i know not the easiest to work with but what gorgeous grain,love that...

What's it look like from the top?

Thanks Jake.   The compaction was in the other direction  (hardway) so on the flat it would just unravel..   The Grain flow did come out pretty good.. I love it when there is a deep groove or inset so the grain changes to match.. :)

The top and bottom look beautiful.  :)  I don't have any with the handle in it but I do have some before the handle was put in just before hardening.  The outside looking crack at the back does not go all the way through so comfortable it should hold up just fine. 
 

3 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Indeed!  Looks almost like homemade iron.  I have a wagon tire like that, to make a decent hawk I have to refine it (cut, stack, and weld three times, drawing down to original size each time) to get it to hold. 


Thanks Alan.  I think it might have been laid up from small round bar.. it was really cool how that back loose strip sheared on both sides of the pole before it was wrapped..  YOu can see the bar on the snapped side of the raw bar and where it ended up after the flanks were forged.  

 As for refinement.. Your right.. Time was a factor and I didn't want to waste any more of the wrought than needed..  this Wrought was donated to me from a buddy at the NEB meets for a hammer build.. I still have enough for the hammer.. 

As for the wagon tire.. Is it raveling on the flat or the hard way?   Or is it cracking in the fold?   

I did start to edit the video but it takes 6hrs - 8hrs to forge these,   so not sure a video "How to" is appropriate..

I did have to push the cutting edge back in line some.. You can see in the pre hardening clean up photo the eye was a little bit over..  

So, just after forging and clean up before hardening.. And after heat treatment. 

 

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Edited by JenniferP
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You guys might find these 3 photos interesting.    This is how it ended up after welding  and then I pulled the top down..  This is how I was able to keep the wrought iron together.. :) 

I'm not sure why, but I am attracted to the post weld shape..  I love the shape it has now for this hatchax.. But I think I see another carving hatchet in the mix. 

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REALLY nice,Jennifer,thanks for all the additional photos.

Great control of this challenging stuff,and good for you for appreciating all of it's wildness and beauty!:0

Great job,again,i'd bet it's a good tool.

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12 hours ago, JenniferP said:

Is it raveling on the flat or the hard way?   Or is it cracking in the fold?   

Mostly on the flat, and cracking in the fold.

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