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Chris Christenberry

Yet one more question about 2x72 belt grinders

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Thanks.  I've been looking at lights like that.  Will probably go somewhere in that direction.

 

Got my bench set up where it belongs.  Mounted the motor controller up at eye level and not on the table.  I need to go buy a plug that fits the 220 receptacle on the wall and then hook up the motor and I'll (I hope and pray) be ready to "throw the switch".  Knowing me, it will be imperative I wear safety glasses, a face shield and ear-plugs when I do that!  :D  Ya jus never know what's gonna happen when I do the wiring!

 

 

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Looks good!

 

2 hours ago, Chris Christenberry said:

safety glasses, a face shield and ear-plugs when I do that! 

 

And steel-toed boots with metatarsal guards!  Grinders can throw a blade at your toes with surprising speed. ;)

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Regarding lighting: the more the better.  I really like the LED shop lights that look like the old style fluorescent shop lights.

 

 

3 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

And steel-toed boots with metatarsal guards!  Grinders can throw a blade at your toes with surprising speed. ;)

Hmm, I never considered that.  You know how the Coyote is just fine running in mid-air until he looks down and becomes aware of his peril?  I'll probably end up with a blade in my foot this weekend...

 

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5 minutes ago, Brian Dougherty said:

Regarding lighting: the more the better.  I really like the LED shop lights that look like the old style fluorescent shop lights.

 

 

Hmm, I never considered that.  You know how the Coyote is just fine running in mid-air until he looks down and becomes aware of his peril?  I'll probably end up with a blade in my foot this weekend...

 

 

It's not really that big an issue, grinders don't grab like buffers do.  I have a bucket of water under the grinder so any dropped blade ends up there instead of on the floor or in my foot.

 

For lighting, I have an old swing-arm reading lamp with a 100-watt equivalent bulb, daylight spectrum.  That thing is bright!  

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21 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

And steel-toed boots with metatarsal guards!  Grinders can throw a blade at your toes with surprising speed. 

Heck, Alan, I was just talkin' about the danger of "throwing the switch" on something I've wired!  Chasin' dem lectrics ain't my strong point! :D

 

 

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Chris, I just got my Pheer 454 grinder a few weeks ago. I love it! We have a Wilton at work, but this Pheer is way better for less money. Belt changes literally take 10 seconds or less. The Wilton takes a couple minutes to change a belt, and then re-tracking the belt is a pain. The Pheer tracks very easy. I'm really glad I bought it. I mounted mine on one of the Harbor Freight welding tables that tilts 90°. I mounted the grinder on the right side of it and the table will tilt 90° to the left making it a horizontal grinder. Haven't needed to use it that way yet, but can if I need to. I got a surface grinder attachment for it too that works awesome. Going to be making some Damascus this weekend.

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Glad to hear you are happy with it, Paul.  No way I can afford to buy a surface grinder attachment.  If I ever have one, I'll have to make it myself.  I did, however, buy the small wheel attachment with mine.  All those little inside radius-es I often have problems with should be much more uniform now.

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17 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

grinders don't grab like buffers do

Dang right! The only thing I've ever had a grinder catch is wood or a bolster because of its small size....but then I always try to have my work surface up to keep a physical barrier between the knife and my lower body. Buffers on the other hand, that involves a whole new set of rules and a watchful eye. Never buff a top edge is a big one. Always buff the lower half of a part, then rotate it to get the upper half. I had more blanks whipped out of my hand than I can count until I learned that rule. I believe I can consider myself a semi-expert on using a buffer, I can get a near mirror polish on anything. But every time I start to use one I stop, look how I'm standing and holding the piece and remember I don't want a giant hole in my feet!

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Chris, I ordered the small wheel attachment a couple weeks ago. Can't wait until it gets here. I got it with 1/2", 3/4" and 1" wheels. What did you get?

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 I bought the 5 solid steel wheel set.   (1/2, 5/8, 3/4, 7/8 and 1")  Of course, as you might already know, the basic small wheel arm comes with a rubber covered 1" wheel.........regardless of what wheels set you order.

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On 5/21/2020 at 4:39 PM, Brian Dougherty said:

  I really like the LED shop lights that look like the old style fluorescent shop lights.

Me too! They're also great for hand sanding. Much easier to see scratches.

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Congrats on the grinder! I just got the shipping notice on my Ameribrade 2x72. I just yesterday had an outlet installed on it's own breaker as my shop (garage) was woefully lacking in outlets, plus they were 15 amp , I mow have some 20a outlets. I wish I could have been able to add a 220 line but after spending money like a a drunken sailor I had to cut the wish list down. 

I just did a sorta upgrade for my lighting I would like to share. I bought a three panel LED that screws into an existing light socket. It is 4000 lumens and Daylight bright. Make a surpricing amount of light and I will get one or two more. 

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Got the grinder wired up today.  Works just as advertised.  Only I've one little problem.  In forward mode, the belt tracking is easily controlled, but when I put the motor in reverse, the belt tracks off to the right about a half inch and any adjustments I make to the adjustment wheel just make it track further to the right.  What can I do to remedy this?

 

 

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That's a new one to me, but then my grinder doesn't have a reverse gear...  I suspect that since it works in forward mode with the tracking wheel being the last thing the belt touches before the platen, that the crown or alignment on the drive wheel is throwing it off in reverse.  The quick and easy fix (if it works) is winding a few layers of 3/4" or so masking tape around the drive wheel to give it more crown.  If that doesn't work, you may have to shim some of the mounting bolts to shift the drive wheel around until it's exactly lined up.  Have you asked the guy you got it from?  Most makers are very concerned that their stuff works right and will do whatever it takes to fix it.  

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I aligned the drive wheel to the platen wheels with a straight edge.  I sent Jose an e-mail along with the video.  He typically isn't real fast in returning e-mails..............too busy making grinders I guess.  But he will respond in a day or so.  My buddy, David Mooneyham suggested flipping the belt.  I'm headed outside to try that right now.  He also asked me how tight I have the belt.  Is there some way to reference just how tight a belt needs to be?  I know with my wood bandsaw, the tightness is referenced by how much you can deflect the blade with your finger.

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I like to have my belts tight enough that the short stretch between tracking wheel and platen twangs like a guitar string.  The A below middle C, kind of.  And check the belt, some only run in one direction.  There will be arrows on the back if that is the case.  

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Yeah, I know about the arrow thing.  My poor old ears can't hear pitches well enough any more to find "the A below middle C".  :D

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Jose just got back with me and said these machines don't track well in reverse and if I try to make it track in reverse, it won't track well in forward.  Is that the experience you guys have with your belt grinders?

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I don't have any experience with running my grinder in reverse, but I would expect to have to adjust the tracking if I did change directions.  Tracking adjustments are basically trimming out all of the little bias forces at work in making the belt go around.  Those forces are going to be different when running the other way.

 

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I have to ask, why do you need the belt to run backwards? This can actually be a bit on the dangerous side...if you're working a blade and it catches somehow on that belt it'll throw it right at your face.

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A few English smiths (among others) I know like to run the belt away from the blade rather than towards the blade.  It is similar to how the Sheffield knife grinders used their stone wheels.  But as Brian said, the tracking adjustment has to be the last stop before the platen or contact wheel, which means you need either a dedicated directional grinder or a two-wheel grinder like the Coote.  Since my grinder is a non-VFD three-speed it only runs in the one direction, so I never really thought about it.

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56 minutes ago, Brian Myers said:

I have to ask, why do you need the belt to run backwards? This can actually be a bit on the dangerous side...if you're working a blade and it catches somehow on that belt it'll throw it right at your face.

 

I have used the 2x72 running a leather belt backwards (not my belt grinder) for stropping.  In that instance, the knife was held on the part of the belt that goes from the top platen roller to the tracking roller.  So in reality, the belt was traveling away from me and it wasn't going to throw anything in my direction.  Also,  I use a slightly rounded bevel on many of my wood carving blades and it works well to use a sanding belt in that same position to take advantage of the slight deformation of the belt in that area.

 

I have figured out how to modify my tracking system, but I'm hesitant to try and do the work without having access to a milling machine.  If I ever get it modified, I'll post pictures and an explanation.

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Hmmm...if that's the case then can I make a suggestion. I hate for you to spend more money lol, but when I was first starting out I did a lot of my work on a 1x30 harbor freight belt grinder. It eventually formed a crack in the case, so to be safe I bought another one. But the original still worked...so I actually tipped it on its back so that the belt was running reverse of what I was used to. I did this to put edges on my blades and for stropping. I learned to do it on my 2x72 so I stopped, but if you just need it to do stropping, I would suggest doing that! No messing with your grinder, just an extra tool set off the the side.

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Good suggestion, Brian.  But my 1x30 is set up for small blade and tool sharpening at this point.....................however, as I get used to using the new 2x72 the 1x30 may fall by the wayside.  The main thing is the leather belt needs to travel at a much, much slower speed and the 1x30 can't be slowed down enough to use the leather belt on it.  I used to use a leather belt on a 1x42 I had and it heated the blades up too much. 

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Ah I didn't know that. I do all my leather stropping by hand with an either a scrap of sheath leather or an actual old-time razor strop.

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