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Gary Mulkey

Dogbone D-Guard Bowie

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Posted (edited)

While waiting on some blades to H/T,  I got in some forging time.  If you look closely you'll see that the cutting edge and ricasso on this blade are level.  This requires a little different forging technique from the modern ABS style.  This type of blade is usually marked by a small notch between the cutting edge & ricasso.  Since this type of blade profile was common 150 years ago, I'm going to give this one a 19th century style hilt to match the 19th century blade.

 

I've decided to give this one a D-Guard,  Dogbone type hilt which was common back then.  The blade here is W1 and I'm planning on using Damascus fittings for the handle (guard, frame tang, front handle spacers & overlaid escutcheons).  Since I didn't have any appropriate ivory scales I'm using some ivory micarta.

 

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Edited by Gary Mulkey

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Love where this is going Gary

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I got the hilt designed today as well as a start on making the Damascus billet for the fittings.  This billet will be a 21 x 9 W pattern.  (I'm keeping the layer count low as it will be reduced in size so much when I forge the fittings.)  The D-guard,  frame tang and front handle spacers will be forged from it.

 

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The first set of pics here  is for the D-guard.  I will leave it rough forged until I finish the handle and then finish forging it to shape.

 

The remainder of the pics will be for the handle spacers.  (I've yet to forge the frame tang and escutceons from this billet.)

 

 

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Hi Gary. I notice you seem to put escutcheons on many (/most?) of your bowies. Is this for historical reasons or simply that you like them? Thanks.

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17 hours ago, Charles dP said:

Hi Gary. I notice you seem to put escutcheons on many (/most?) of your bowies. Is this for historical reasons or simply that you like them? Thanks.

Charles,

 

It's probably a little of both.  It was a common practice years ago but sometimes I do it just to dress up the handle a little.  It also gives the owner the opportunity to add their name.

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  This one has been on the back burner for a while but I got a  part of the handle fittings roughed out.  I got the guard forged but forgot to snap a pic of it before I started annealing it.  I'll slot it for the tang and drill for the pommel nut before shaping into a "D".  (the two small pieces on the right will be the overlaid escutcheons)

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I got the guard slotted & forged to shape this morning.  It still needs to be tweeked a little but things are starting to take shape.  My next step will be to start on the double beveled ivory scales and to make the domed pin heads.

 

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I wasn't sure about a D-guard on a dogbone at first, but I can see it now.  Ought to be nice with the ivory!

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Gary's "On the back burner for a while" is faster than I can move a front-line project :P

 

I agree that this one is taking shape nicely.  Am I just becoming more aware, or have you been experimenting more lately with design styles?

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36 minutes ago, Brian Dougherty said:

Gary's "On the back burner for a while" is faster than I can move a front-line project :P

 

I agree that this one is taking shape nicely.  Am I just becoming more aware, or have you been experimenting more lately with design styles?

 

I don't know if I'm experimenting more now.  I am always trying to keep each one unique.;)

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Working the ivory:

 

The pins that you see here are temporary & only there to hold everything in place while I shape the handle.  The final assembly pins will be longer and will be peened over domed pin heads.

 

 

 

 

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Once the polyurethane sealer coat dries this one will be ready to assemble.  Next step is to make the 18 pin heads.

 

 

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I'd like to see how you make the pins. please.

 

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those scales are slick.

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As I was asked how I make the domed pin heads hopefully this will show you.  Please note that I am not recommending this method for everyone as it requires working very close to high speed moving parts.  If you are not completely comfortable with doing this then I wouldn't recommend this method.

 

tools needed:

metal turning lathe (preferably a small one)

tail stock with Jacob's chuck for lathe

1/16" drill bit

small file (4" or 6" mill bastard)

emery cloth

jeweler's saw

 

materials:

3/16" N/S round rod

 

Center boring:

 

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Filing the end half round:

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Sand smooth and score the rod just behind the domed end with lathe tool just deep enough for the blade of the jeweler's saw to ride  comfortably.  Saw through with jeweler's saw.

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Always make extras as they are easy to lose and often some won't be perfectly center bored and you'll need to cull them.

 

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I think that you can now call it a dogbone.  Now to make it a D-guard.

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Posted (edited)

:PThere's still much to do yet on this one but all of the components are there now.

 

I gave the blade a differential H/T which means there's a lot of etch & polish yet to do.

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As I've worked on this one the ivory has gotten soiled repeatedly.  I've cleaned it many times and will need to again before giving it a final coat of polyurethane to insure a good surface.

Edited by Gary Mulkey

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