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What did you do in your lockdown today?


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There are a couple of things you can do if you live somewhere with late frosts. One is to start your plants indoors and move them outside for a little bit to harden them up when it's still a little chilly out. By the tie it gets to be time to plant, you are planting plants, instead of seeds. Another thing is to save any large clear plastic jugs, bottles, or other containers and put them upside down over the plants. This creates a little greenhouse effect and can keep them warm enough overnight to survive. Them=n again, there's the cold frame like Gerald does or just covering them with plastic sheeting.

 

22 hours ago, Brian Myers said:

but being able to plant so early must be nice.

Yeah but we have already hit triple digit temps and the pollen isn't viable at that heat. Come July, I will be doing everything I can just to keep stuff alive.

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was up about 4.30 this morning (not uncommon for me) so decided to do something productive and made some lunch rolls. 3 1/2 lb flour plus a half cups each of wheat and oat bran with 8 tables spoons of

I just finished cutting my own hair. No, I will not be posting a photo.

That's a huge job stripping paint off That is going to look brilliant once done.   I had to shift over to wood working projects, as much as I would like to hit some steel, its not reasonable

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35 minutes ago, Joshua States said:

Yeah but we have already hit triple digit temps and the pollen isn't viable at that heat. Come July, I will be doing everything I can just to keep stuff alive.

I remember when Organic Gardening magazine still came out I was a big fan. There was an article about desert gardening using native American methods. Something called waffle gardening for laying everything out to protect them from wind and then using about two feet of hay as mulch. Keeping as much moisture in the ground and keeping the roots cooler.

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Yeah, well, I don't know if I showed this before, but I keep my garden inside a chain link panel cage. The open gables are covered with 1/4" hardware cloth and the top is covered with shade cloth. It's a tough way to garden, but it keeps the varmints out.

Garden cage.JPG

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Yeah but we have already hit triple digit temps and the pollen isn't viable at that heat. Come July, I will be doing everything I can just to keep stuff alive.

A friend in Southern Cal, I visited once in late April, his snow peas were 6-7 feet tall and looked like a jungle, but by the end of May, the plants would all be dead from the heat.    They were so good, I was eating them like a kid with candy.  Where I'm at, it's hard to get a good crop, the time between warm enough to start growing and too hot to survive is about 8 weeks. 

Edited by Gerald Boggs
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  • 3 weeks later...

Last weekend we camped at an amazing site in the Khomas Hochland, and the long weekend before that a very pleasant birthday escape to the coast.
Lockdown has mostly been lifted and since yesterday we can buy booze legally again.....except that the shops were emptied out during the AM.
My employer has declared working from home the new normal, renovations have been stopped and they're giving up most of the office space we rent.
Thanks to my support function I'm clearly picking up a lethargy (being kind) in many of my colleagues, and since I've only given my best to assist them, this is affecting me.
Did some soul searching and close as I can come to an answer, I feel like I'm fouling my home (small flat) with my work.

My "workshop" is a garage 5 steps from my front door, and I haven't been in there in two weeks.

Juxtaposed with the knowledge I should be thankful for having a job at full pay through all this.

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That's totally understandable. Home is home and work is work! I've k own people who were able to combine the two and have sparkly, happy lives, but I think the two should always be separate. Coming home from work is a release from the cares of the day, but now that just means closing down your computer and going to the kitchen. You need a space...just big enough to do your work in comfort that you can leave at the end of the work day and not deal with till tomorrow. Perhaps a small section of your workshop that you can close off from the dust and can work without interference. 

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On 6/4/2020 at 1:32 AM, Gerald Boggs said:

Made a second small batch of strawberry/rhubarb jam.  It's tough to do, when someone is eating all the strawberries.

 

I use my grandmothers recipe for rhubarb but ours  has figs in it and is a favourite of the family.

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I think if I had ever asked my grandmother for a recipe, she would have looked at me and said "What recipe?, you just make it" :-)  Although, I really, really wish I had her Minced Meat recipe.

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My nephew caught the biggest large mouth bass I've ever seen in person.

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Nice! Bring him down to Tennessee, we'll put him onto some blue catfish lol. Our record so far is 112 pounds. 20 to 40 is common in most areas. Its like trying to walk a dog with a fishing pole lol.

Edited by Brian Myers
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  • 4 weeks later...

I’m a little late to this but oh boy we have had a lot going on!! Because four out of the six in my family had a bad bout with pneumonia in February and March we decided to evacuate Ecuador and sit out  the virus in rural Kentucky.

    So we put a garden in. We eat a lot of eggs so why not get a few chickens! Well buying chickens leads to needing a place to keep them so I built a chicken tractor. Also I have been working on furniture to make the house more comfortable. It helps when your dad has a pile of old barn wood!! 

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On 7/6/2020 at 7:17 AM, Aaron Gouge said:

...so I built a chicken tractor.

 Why does this make me think of   "..it's a chicken that got caught in a tractor's nuts"?

 

BTW, nice furniture :)

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“BTW, nice furniture :)“

   Thanks Brian! Some of that wood is probably 200 years old! 
    Some one else will have to help with the quote. You lost me!

     Aaron 

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A chicken tractor is a rolling/movable, bottomless enclosure for allowing to keep chickens captivated, but easily moved to new "pasture" around the yard.  People build them in all different sizes.  I've seen them as small as 3'x4' and as large at 12'x18'...............and I'm sure there are larger.  Do a search on-line and you'll see lots of examples.

Edited by Chris Christenberry
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My squash and zucchini got hit by borer beetles. I need to start planting them later in the year after the bugs have moved on. But instead I pulled up the dead and dying plants, harvested what veggies there were, then planted two types of watermelon, sugar baby and congo. There should be just enough time left in my season to get one or two melons lol. Perks of living in the south, it'll stay warm till at least October.

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3 hours ago, Brian Myers said:

it'll stay warm till at least October

 

Last year it was plain HOT until mid-November, IIRC...  Last lawn-mow of the year was December 12.  First was March 15.

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1 hour ago, Alan Longmire said:

 

Last year it was plain HOT until mid-November, IIRC...  Last lawn-mow of the year was December 12.  First was March 15.

I live about halfway up the escarpment in mcminnville so we start getting cold around the middle of October. Though I do remember one Halloween where it was only 19 degrees lol.

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And I'm halfway up the mountain outside Johnson City, where it used to be cold in September...

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I’m not one who loves to mow the yard. Maybe that’s because I’ve never had a nice lawn! :-) Anyways when we lived outside Salem Oregon I would stop mowing grass before the Fourth of July and not start again until the end of September!! Friends are like you need to water your grass it’s  dying. I be like no then I would have to mow it! We did have to water the garden quite a bit though to keep the vegetables growing

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I don't mind mowing, but I do not water, weed, or fertilize the lawn.  I get a nice balance of clover and other short wildflowers for the bees that way, and I don't have to mow as often.  Last year, though, I took over mowing the yard for the widow next door when she became a widow.  Her late husband didn't water it, but he was very enthusiastic about spreading weed-and-feed chemicals.  He loved to mow twice a week if not more.  I do not, so it tends to get a little thick and high on my  schedule.  :rolleyes:

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I agree and hate mowing.  When I was growing up in the Chicago 'burbs, my Dad always said that by not watering, he was forcing the roots to grow deeper and the lawn to get stronger.  I recently heard a radio program about how watering lawns in southern CA was the biggest use (waste?) of water and due to the lack of water in reservoirs there's most likely going to be legislation prohibiting the practice in the future.

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I live in the Sonoran Desert. I think I remember what a Lawn is. It's like a small grazing pasture right? ;)

 

Anyway, we retiled the shower in our Master suite.

 

 

New Shower (1).JPG

New Shower (2).JPG

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On 7/20/2020 at 9:33 AM, Brian Dougherty said:

Nice tile.  How's the water situation on your land?

Here in AZ we have a shared well with 3 other houses. No problems as of yet. We are pretty close to Lake Pleasant, so the water table is fairly high and stable.

We just got back from a few days on our New Mexico property, I had to clear some trees for the power company to bring lines in. That well is only 350 feet deep. Last month we were out there and I emptied the 1000 gallon storage tank. I had to refill it. I ran the well for about an hour straight before it dumped 400 gallons in the tank and quit. I let it recharge for another half-hour or so, and put another 400 gallons in the tank.

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