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Faye

Hammer in portfolio WIP

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Sorry to hear about lack of access to the shop, but it's gotta feel good to have some employment these days. 

Stay safe.

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On 5/18/2020 at 8:35 PM, Joshua States said:

For those of us with little memory, that "stuff" is what again?

 

https://www.travers.com/6-lb-can-keepbryte-anti-scale-cmpnd-kasenit/p/81-003-106/

 

It's probably not the best stuff out there, but it works.  Brownell's is supposed to be really good, and I want to try the stuff that Dan O'Connor is making these days, but I still have most of this can and I'm cheap.  

 

Good luck with the new job, Faye!   

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Posted (edited)

What's that bit about not using it over 1650 degrees F?  Wouldn't that keep one from using it while forge welding billets?

Edited by Chris Christenberry

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You don't use anti-scale for welding, only heat treating after everything is cleaned up.  If you get too hot with the anti-scale powder it will start eating the steel.  Leaves nasty pits.  Ask me how I found that out...:rolleyes:

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 Oh, okay.  Still lots to learn.

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12 hours ago, billyO said:

Sorry to hear about lack of access to the shop, but it's gotta feel good to have some employment these days. 

Stay safe.

 

5 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Good luck with the new job, Faye!   

Thank you both. Its been really fun so far, and I got invited to the neighbors shop were they make some knives, so I might have access to a closer shop. We will see.

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Progress on the seax. After a couple failed handles I glued one up. It just kills me that this is sitting back in my shop waiting to be finished. It's so close! Soon...

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Made it back to my shop for a half day and shaped the handle. I tweeked my handle shaping process, but still need to acquire some serious patience. Though I like the general look of the handle right now it lacks that simple elegance that makes it look right. It seems a bit too wide and blocky. I know if it looks wrong it probably is wrong, but I thought I'd see if you guys thought it could be fixed with the material thats left or if I should cut it off and start over.

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Doesn't look bad to me, but not the typical look I go for. And, the look I go for is just a copy of the makers that I admire. 

You're at a crossroads. If you intend to keep it; I would fix it how you want. If you're thinking of selling; you might just let it go. 

Overall, looking good! 

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I'm the opposite of Zeb. If you intend to keep it, leave it alone and keep it as a constant reminder to do things differently. If you intend to sell it, don't let it out the door until you think it's "right". It may be the angle of the camera, but in the last pic, it doesn't look centered on the blade.

 

Here is the best advice I can give you at this point: Set this one aside for a week or a month and start making a new knife. Come back to this one later and look at it again with fresh eyes.

Then make a decision.

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Hey Joshua! I used to be with you on that. Maybe I still am in a way. I get epiphanies on what's right and wrong pretty often. So long as the insight you express is your own I guess... I had a long conversation with a guy in sales marketing last weekend and came to some conclusion (right or not) its really what market you would prefer to appeal to I guess. My only line of thought on a knife with a defect is you can chase the "flaw" (in this case an uncertainty in design that maybe only you see), or you can let it go to someone who's gonna love it anyway. I did this with a sheath I had someone else make for me a while back. Sold the whole thing cheaper because of the sheath quality and apologized to the customer over and over, but when he got it; he saw absolutely no problems. He loved both knife and sheath. 

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Zeb, and Faye: You decide what you are OK with in selling your wares. If I said I never sold a knife that I thought had a flaw, I would be a liar.

Every knife I make has flaws that I can see. Some I'm OK with selling, others I'm not.

Generally speaking, If any maker is questioning whether something should be changed, and is hesitant about selling it, that's a red flag in my book.

I have given knives away rather than sell them. I have hidden knives away rather than give them away.

 

The handle shape on this knife is fine considering the level of experience of the maker. She should be proud of the product and comfortable with the idea of selling it before she does so. However, if her discomfort with the end result is because she is comparing her work to the work of more experienced makers, and that causes a feeling of "it's not good enough", trash that idea right now. There will be makers better than you, or me, for many years to come. Always do the best you can, and be OK with that. Each one gets "better". 

 

On 6/23/2020 at 12:15 PM, Faye said:

Though I like the general look of the handle right now it lacks that simple elegance that makes it look right. It seems a bit too wide and blocky.

 

Frankly, I disagree with this assessment. Maybe I should have said this earlier. It is a simple handle. The fit and finish look clean and the dimensions look proportional to the blade.

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It is intended to be my KITH contribution. I suppose my biggest issue with it is that it's not exactly what I was going for. Not to mention it is not perfectly centered with the blade. 

The good news is that it has to sit around the way it is for a good while before I can get back to my shop. 

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Take a look at some historical pictures featuring people with that size seax and you may notice that the handles were longer in proportion to the blades.  If you make another you might want to take that into account and add a few inches to the length of the handle.  Other than that, great work.

 

Doug

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On 6/30/2020 at 7:39 PM, Faye said:

I suppose my biggest issue with it is that it's not exactly what I was going for.

Oh well. Welcome to the craft...….:blink:

 

On 6/30/2020 at 7:39 PM, Faye said:

Not to mention it is not perfectly centered with the blade

That can be fixed. I can show you how.

 

6 hours ago, Doug Lester said:

that size seax and you may notice that the handles were longer in proportion to the blades.

This is good info for the next one. Log that in your notebook.

 

 

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