Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Alec Steele got a custom designed anvil that weighs 140, specifically so it meets the criteria for ground shipping.  I can vouch for the alloy and heat treat on these.  I have no idea what he is going to be charging when he starts to sell them.  I have been waiting months to share this with you all!  

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

In his livestream yesterday I’m pretty sure he said they would be priced around 1100-1300. They definitely look pretty cool! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jerrod, you dog!  I don't know if I could have kept that under my hat that long. :lol:  And, I am impressed with the anvil!  Classic London pattern, heel not too thin, and seeing the abuse he put it through with zero dents, well, that got my attention for sure.  Using a 22lb sledge on the hardy?  A 12 lb sledge on cold steel on the horn?  I cringed to watch, but by golly it not only survived, but shrugged it off like a much larger anvil.  Hats off to you, sir!  

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

Jerrod, you dog!  I don't know if I could have kept that under my hat that long. :lol:  And, I am impressed with the anvil!  Classic London pattern, heel not too thin, and seeing the abuse he put it through with zero dents, well, that got my attention for sure.  Using a 22lb sledge on the hardy?  A 12 lb sledge on cold steel on the horn?  I cringed to watch, but by golly it not only survived, but shrugged it off like a much larger anvil.  Hats off to you, sir!  

 

Thanks!  I cringed, too.  Had no idea he would try that, but I am glad he did.  I did a bit of solid modeling and casting simulation on it.  We had to make the waist a bid thicker than his initial design to get the anvil more sound (and then a little shorter to keep the weight down).  I would have preferred it to be thicker still (more mass under the face), but he wanted that shape and I feel we really got close to what his initial vision was.  I have no idea how the sides of the anvil came out that nice, future castings will likely have a few small defects, but the striking surfaces will be pristine.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was wondering if you were involved when I watched his video last night.  Nice work.

(Yeah, I had to close my eyes when he started abusing it to see if he could break it)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, that's a beautiful anvil.  A work of art, for sure, Jarrod.  I know you are proud of it, as you should be.  I'll never advance to the level of needing (or affording) such a piece of equipment, but just to have one in my shop and be able to rub my hands on it would be a treat in itself.

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Ben Hoover said:

I really do hope he comes out with a lighter version for those of us with much lighter pockets.

Sadly I cannot comment on anything that he has not published first.  I can say that I am quite certain that he is very aware of the need (or market, rather) for as bunch of affordable stuff.  I was a little disappointed that he wanted this anvil to be at 140 pounds (I love bigger anvils as much as the next guy).  But then I found out it was for shipping purposes and that it was  a big concern for him.  I wouldn't be surprised to see a lot of things eventually be offered from him.  Someday there may even be a Steele brand power hammer kit, or rolling mill kit (which we definitely would not make at the foundry).  Certainly smaller things, too.  And likely smaller things first, as they are cheaper and easier to get going and sell.  That is pure speculation from what I have seen on his site and YouTube channel.  It is always nice to see a customer that happy with a product, though.  I fully expect a bit more business from him simply from that regard (and well, he DID pay for an expensive pattern that can make hundreds more anvils off of it).  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I strongly suspect he'll eventually offer an entry-level anvil expedient, just because there's such a demand AND he's quite the businessman.  And Jerrod, you guys should put the clip of him bashing the snot out of his anvil on your site!  You can't pay for that kind of advertising. ;)  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd love to have one of his 2x48 belt grinders because of all the tooling arms and attachments. The surface grinder alone would be awesome. Lol, too bad I'm a po' boy! I don't really forge anymore, I do stock removal and I work out of a 7x7 shop so there isn't a lot of room for tools. But if he had something along the lines of the Black/Sea Robin anvils...tempting!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Alan Longmire said:

Jerrod, you guys should put the clip of him bashing the snot out of his anvil on your site!  You can't pay for that kind of advertising. ;)  

 

Believe it or not, there isn't actually a lot of margin in making these.  Therefore, we tend to prefer sticking to our core business:  Rock crushing parts.  Here is a (sales/marketing) video from one of our bigger customers.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

We were just talking about this in the office.  We have a couple orders (let's just say a few dozen anvils) to make now.  Not bad for just his first article review and pre-orders.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

It impressed really. It’s just another London pattern? I guess if you enjoy the fandom and shelling out $$ for said fandom, I don’t see the appeal. I’m sure it’s a quality tool. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I also thought a little of the same thing, London pattern? I watched the video, and I believe the pattern was chosen as it's a little more familiar to people.  I get to see some really really nice south German vintage anvils.  The gent who has them has said how much he likes them in comparison to London patterns.  Unfortunately, I have not used one, but I do see a lot of advantages to them. 

 

I thought that if I ever go after another anvil it would probably be a south German pattern. Either the Rigid, or the local guy who is also making them out of one of the small mills around here. Both are awful expensive.

 

 

Edited by Daniel W
Link to post
Share on other sites

The ridged is a north german pattern. The refflinghaus is a south german pattern.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Chill, gentlemen. 

 

It's what Alec wanted, and if you watch the video he abuses the heck out of it and it survives.  Sure it's expensive, it's made in USA and has a youtube influencer's name attached.  Price one of Jymm Hoffman's H13 colonials or one of Holland Anvil's German patterns, they're in the same range per pound.  If you don't want one don't buy one.  If you want it cheaper, make one yourself.  Call up a foundry and get a quote for a one-off in an anvil-worthy alloy.  You'll think this one is cheap.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

If I had the $1300 I would have bought one. I even brought it up to my wife a time or 3 but was shot down every time. I wouldn't doubt it if he makes a double horn of sorts. There is enough demand for them. I'm not the biggest fan of the London pattern anvils but they are 100% worthy of being an anvil. As a matter of fact I am down to using my 100 lb Vulcan until my next shipment of anvils come in. The pattern hasn't effected the work that I do it just gets way hotter than my 426 lb anvil did. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

If I had the $1300 I would have bought one. I even brought it up to my wife a time or 3 but was shot down every time. I wouldn't doubt it if he makes a double horn of sorts. There is enough demand for them. I'm not the biggest fan of the London pattern anvils but they are 100% worthy of being an anvil. As a matter of fact I am down to using my 100 lb Vulcan until my next shipment of anvils come in. The pattern hasn't effected the work that I do it just gets way hotter than my 426 lb anvil did. 

the hell you doing eating them???

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well the doctor said my iron levels were low so I found a home remedy!!! :lol:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

i feel a bit ignorant about my previous post, theres no way i could justify spending that on an anvil, but im only one person forging little thin tapers. it would be nice to have a striker with a sledgehammer, then i would be more accepting. 

 

i really hate hype though, it is destroying the mountain bike industry by selling people bikes that have way too much suspension for the riding that most people do, and i imagined the anvil would be sold to average smiths who would do just as good with something cheaper.  that was dumb of me, and more of a reaction than a thought. 

 

the anvil may deserve the hype though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

i think the point of the abuse? in the video is to get the point across that this is an heirloom tool that will out last the life of the smith using it even if he gets a bit carried away when you look at a tool that way it really comes down to $130 a year for 10 years cheep in the grand scale expensive when you have to pay for it all at once 

 

are there better anvils for cheaper yes how long will it take you to find one vs getting the money together for this one

 

it took me 20 years to get my first power hammer had i saved and bought one 15 years ago theirs no telling how it would have helped me (well my shoulder wouldn't be as bad that's for sure) in just in the few months i have had the one i cant imagine doing without and am amazed how much quicker i could have done so many orders i had in the past

 

he also has to get past the stigma that cast anvils have due to harbor freights anvil shaped objects

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I was just going through and doing month end inventory this morning and saw something I thought some of you may be interested in.  There was one of these anvils in the scrap section, and at first glance I couldn't see why.  Then I looked closely, and saw the bolt holes at the feet were not all there.  The cores had broken on 3 of the 4 bolt hoes, but otherwise the casting looked great.  Therefore the part is scrapped.  At this point in the process we had made several cores and a mold, melted the metal, poured it, and cut the rigging off.  Sure, we'll get most of the metal back as remelt, but the rest of the costs are completely lost.  At least we didn't grind the flashing and rigging contacts off, heat treat it, or surface grind the face yet (the rest of the cleanup is done by Alec and his team).  So we lost about half of our cost to making a part (probably more).  This happens.  If we are having a pretty good month our scrap rate is less than 4% on everything (based on sales price; many of our parts are cheaper to scrap and re-make than correct).  This is why new anvils are so expensive.  The tooling costs a lot, then there is a lot of labor in making them.  Nobody is pocketing a ton of cash on these things.  But we are providing some good employment to people as they are made.  We'll be making a couple hundred more by the end of the year.  And fun fact: the base is recessed, and that is where our internal part number is.  So if you ever see one and are wondering about the hidden number on the bottom, that is just the foundry part number.  

20200901_093619[1].jpg

 

And for those looking really close, that is not a crack on the horn side of the body.  That is a raised bit from the mold wash that would otherwise be ground away if we were going to be selling the part.  It is quite normal.  Also, I know many of you are thinking "I'd take that at a reduced price!", unfortunately that is not an option.  It is better for Alec's brand to have 100% good products out there.  Just like nobody here would sell a knife with a known serious flaw (even if you knew it wouldn't affect the function of the blade).  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...