Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello all, I’m a novice and doing this as a hobby and for my enjoyment. 
I first started using mild steel making some leaves to learn what end of the hammer to hold. I then used a file for my first knife (prison shank). Then I used a coil spring from a 4 runner and a large coil spring from a off-road shop. What a difference from getting mild steel to move! I then was given a old leaf spring. I just recently went to a spring shop where they repaired and make spring packs for very large trucks. Most of the cut offs are new steel. They are a little thicker than the other leaf spring. I was wondering if any one could identify the steel? I think it’s 1060.

E2C492B7-6682-4014-A7C9-6094D7633D36.jpeg

DB708DD5-02A7-4E67-BC34-2A0A3CE50E47.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

5160 can be stubborn to move under the hammer and the scale can be a bit sticky, I usually grind it off with a wheel before using my belts. Also, go a bit past non-magnetic, 5160 hardens best around 1550F in my experience.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What Al said, plus it will air harden a bit in thin section.  This means it can be hard to drill after forging and normalizing, so as a final step after the last normalizing cycle do an overtemper.  This is just what it sounds like.  Once it has cooled, heat it back up to around 1000 degrees F.  This will soften it enough to drill and file easily.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Alan, I have been having a very hard time with being able to drill in the older leaf spring I used. I had to take a torch to it to have any chances. I’m embarrassed at the number of drill bits I destroyed in frustration!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess how I learned to do that...  :rolleyes:

 

A full spheroidized anneal is better, but if you don't have a heat-treat oven that's not an option.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...