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Hi guys,

 

I am currently working on a little letter-opener which I've decided to forge out of a piece WASP Alloy, also fondly known among those who've had the misfortune of having to work with the stuff - as "Crack-Alloy".

Wasp Alloy.jpg

 

Now, this is the first time I work with the stuff - and I have to say - this is some hard *ss stuff!

image.png

 

I read that the metal is ordinarily worked in the 1850 - 2150 o F. (1010 - 1176 o C)

 

Now, I burned my furnace as hot at possible, running the Propane gas at 25 PSI (1,75 bar). I don't know the temperature exactly, but my infrared thermometer maxes out at 1050 o C, and it was well beyond that. Must've been somewhere around 1350 - 1400 o C in there.

 

I forged the bastard at white hot - and yet it barely moved under the 16kg air hammer.

 

Anyone else have experience with this alloy?

 

Sincerely, Alveprins.

                             

 

 

                               
                               
Edited by Alveprins
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I haven't done anything with this specific alloy, but my job last summer involved working with other Ni alloys and I've done a bit with other gas-turbine blade alloys (casting and metallography though, no forming). Forging any alloy like this is going to be a challenge because they were explicitly designed to resist deformation at high temperatures, some even having ranges where their yield strength increases with temperature. I'm not sure about this alloy, but work hardening is something that might also be in play.

 

Also, just looking at a data sheet, it seems like working above the maximum recommended working temperature causes hot short problems like you are having, which may also be a result of coming out of the forge too hot or even an increase in temperature from the deformation of forging. It seems like to forge this, you need to keep it in that 1850-2150F range and not to work it too hard (but work it hard enough to keep it hot). Doable in a mill where you can precisely control the temperature of your furnace and the parameters of the hot working, but considerably more difficult with a forge and power hammer. Maybe you could use your IR thermometer to make sure you don't work it over 1050C? You won't get the full temperature window to work it but then you know you won't be working it above the max temp.

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3 hours ago, Aiden CC said:

...I'm not sure about this alloy, but work hardening is something that might also be in play.

 

...it seems like working above the maximum recommended working temperature causes hot short problems like you are having, which may also be a result of coming out of the forge too hot or even an increase in temperature from the deformation of forging....Maybe you could use your IR thermometer to make sure you don't work it over 1050C?...

Good input and advice Aiden, I'll give it a try! :)

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