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Texas Samurai BrisketSword


Dan O'Connor
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I am not sure how it was I got away from this forum. Lots of travel with work, time on social media and spending the last couple of years developing anti-scale and hamon clay. Anyway, more back into making blades. The name for this is a bit tongue in cheek I admit. Kind of a hit with the local crowd.

Composite picture of one knife/sword.

 

Loosely based off of a type of Yanagi-ba.

18" blade

W2 steel

Single bevel

Hollow back

Saya-European yew and desert ironwood

Hamon

Oiled leather sheath for saya

 

 

 

 brisketsword composite.2000.jpg

Edited by Dan O'Connor
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Very nice one Daniel! I'm sure you just need to let the weight of the blade do the work on a single buttery stroke.

 

On a side note, are you, like me, sad that the beautiful hamon is going to get a patina? As much as I like playing with hamons, it saddens me to do one on a kitchen knife because of this :unsure:.

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Thanks Dan. Not really that heavy. .190" at the tang and tapers a good bit and the hollow back takes out a goodly amount of weight. The 18" length was more to see if I could do it. 14" is a more manageable length.

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Dan!  Welcome back! :D

 

Excellent re-introduction.  I missed you, man.  We need your knowledge of things Japanese and Texan around here!  Not to mention some good brisket...;)

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Beautiful blade and the handle wood is extraordinarily beautiful!!!

 

I'm glad you back Daniel. Your Japanese  style power hammer was the inspiration I needed to build my hammer. 

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Thanks Guys.

I get so caught up in the tools, like the hammer I built, as well as the  whys and what fors of bladesmithing/knifemaking, I forget to actually make stuff. Trying to change that. Spent a boatload of time experimenting with hamons.You should see some of the info on the forum. Some surprising revelations. Be prepared to back up your arguments to what I post.  :)Disclaimer- a lot of it will reference the clays I developed, make and sell, but will most likely apply to whatever you are using now.

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That’s tremendously marvellous work Dan!

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"Old dogs care about you even when you make mistakes" - Tom HALL - Old Dogs, Children and Watermelon wine.

 

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16 hours ago, Dan O'Connor said:

Not really that heavy. .190" at the tang and tapers a good bit and the hollow back takes out a goodly amount of weight.

 

Very impressive.  Thin, long, curved back, differential quench and not warped (not that I would expect it for you, but if I tried to quench a 18" blade that was around 1/8" thick at the spine I'd certainly get warping.  I'm relatively new to this forum, so don't think I've seen your work before.  Really appreciate you sharing the details.

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4 minutes ago, Dan Hertzson said:

 

.  Thin, long, curved back, differential quench and not warped (not that I would expect it for you, but if I tried to quench a 18" blade that was around 1/8" thick at the spine I'd certainly get warping. 

 Ha! Warps like a snake-Multiple times!  Warps when I normalize. Warps when I heat treat. Warps when I grind the hollow post heat treat. That is the beauty of the differential hardening and leaving a bit of meat all over to have room to tidy up. Just take it to my smooth, flat sawmakers anvil and carefully bang it straight each time with a 2lb polished and slightly crowned  hammer.

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the blade profile is really cool, im working on a few more swordy things with a similar shape.

 

the curve in the blade makes it look powerful, it looks larger than 18".

 

i just noticed it has a chisel grind, i know what you mean about all that straightening, differential hardening is the way to go. 

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A

12 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

One of the busiest I've seen :). What was your clay thickness at spine?

Around 1.5mm

IMG_1172[1].JPG

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1 minute ago, Alan Longmire said:

So the white is your anti-scale clay and the gray is your hamon clay?  

That is correct Alan. More red than gray but yes.

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1 hour ago, Alan Longmire said:

I just pinned your post about it in Tools and Toolmaking, and watched the videos again.  B)

Thanks Alan.

Will update it with better contact info.

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