Jump to content
Rob Toneguzzo

Small Broken Back Seax WIP

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Hi Guys, 
I was sitting on my back deck today and was having a creative conflict. 
I know I have a Seax sheath to finish and was doing some research to get inspiration for that but instead I became distracted with some very cool examples of the smaller broken back Seax and decided to fire the forge.

I started with  a sandwich of 1075, 15n20 and 1075 and forge welded it together.

I then cut grooves in that billet with my bur grinder and did the same on an old post drill shaft. 
Then I cut a thin strip of 15n20 and did the most dodgy stack ever created as you can clearly see.

Anyhow despite that I set the welds and forged out the blade. (Blade is about 5 inches) complete with messy borax scale.

More to come as time permits.

 

 

 

 

 

6E420B6D-2CD7-4CEB-BFDB-2FC4C133EB47.jpeg

7EDFE255-EF00-4FAC-BF7A-C818C4698BB2.jpeg

F53E5C6E-A37A-40C5-A3E6-F9FA41F86BA0.jpeg

2ECF979E-3678-44C0-ABD3-A8D3B79D428A.jpeg

Edited by Rob Toneguzzo
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am all eyes watching Rob. I have something “vaguely” similar in process. Not sure if it will work but yours gives me hope!

Gary LT

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Gary, good luck with your project.

 

Did a rough grind before heat treat tonight. Boy an overnight soak in vinegar and a new belt makes such a difference.

702D195A-A9EC-4009-A804-9DCAD9BBB7BC.jpeg

C1B9E55C-A54B-49CE-83AD-07ACF5D8C20D.jpeg

53C17492-318C-4285-85B0-A8A1C2608F4A.jpeg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whoa. Dodgy or not, that looks like it worked a treat. Sometimes you just have to jump on those inspirations when you get them.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks good so far!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Brian Myers said:

Is that the wolf's tooth design I hear about??

  
Essentially yes Brian but a rough dodgy way of going about it.

My aim here was more to get a wavy line through the blade rather than a tooth pattern hence the wavy grooves and 15n20 between.

If I was going to do a wolf tooth I would take more care in cutting and matching up the teeth bringing them to points  rather than curves.

I would also make more contrast in the steels like a twist or multi layer bar etc and I would not put the layer in between.

I have a plan for a toothy blade in my head.

Anyhow quench/ heat treat went well and I got a bit of a glimpse of the worm in the weld.

Now to go through the grits and etch.

 

DEA3F2AC-3DE8-4475-9531-B3B26D36790E.jpeg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I have had some great success and learned some lessons with this.
 

I am very happy and not so happy With this blade.

 

Good thing is I know exactly where I went wrong and what to do next time.

 

Pros -

I am happy with the blade geometry.

The welds were spot on.

I got a cracker heat treat.

One side of the blade pattern was exactly what I was hoping for.

 

Cons -

The other side of the blade pattern is not exactly what I was hoping for.

 

Where I went wrong - 

 

I chose to do a san mai stack for the lower part of this blade but even though I forged it to the blade geometry I was after I did not take into account the thin layers of 1075 sandwiching the 15n20 were not forged even and when it came to final grind I lost the contrast I was after due to the uneven distribution of my san mai layers.

 

If I was doing this again instead of 3 layers I would have gone for 12 or more or stuck with a solid bar of 1075 instead of the same mai.

 

Anyhow I have learnt heaps from this which is what it’s all about and hopefully it may also be of help for someone else.

 

Now....All I have to do is make a kick arse handle to hopefully redeem myself:)

 

 

 

 

 

F2AE2C46-D61E-4686-A3D7-C3589F7B2BA7.jpeg

6AAF4976-7F4F-4742-AAB0-A313F4998252.jpeg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it may not have been exactly what you were after, but I think it turned out really nice.  Honestly, I like it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed!  I see what you were going for, but I like what you got as well.  Congrats on a tough weld!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys , I really see how pattern welding becomes so darn addictive! I’m already planning the next one.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool!  Now you have me thinking though :ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Rob Toneguzzo said:

Thanks guys , I really see how pattern welding becomes so darn addictive! I’m already planning the next one.

We gots him we did. Infected another one we have. Heh heh heh.

 

I know how you feel about that blade. Dang it does look great on that one side though. The other side still looks cool, but put a handle on that suckah and let it live.

Edited by Joshua States
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Joshua States said:. The other side still looks cool, but put a handle on that suckah and let it live.

 
Josh......I feel a handle idea coming on.... still a bit cloudy but I am sure it will get clearer with the help of a few after work beers.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well those welds are awesome!

The sanmai thing cause me nightmares (or at least headaches).

 

I have to do a lot of sanmai because it was standard on Chinese swords made for the army/emperor and most of the ones owned by wealthy people. I have gotten really obsessive. I have a milling machine, and for the last weld, the one that creates the sanmai billet, I mill all the pieces flat. Plus, I weigh them, and I make sure each of the outside plates is the same thickness and has the same mass. That way, the center plate is in the center given the mass and the volume. If you start it out that way, it will end up that way. Or, at least, it will end up that way unless you really work hard to shift it. Even then, I am not 100% certain you could shift it very far. That's been my experience, anyway. But, if there is a difference in the mass or volume on either side of the center, you are in trouble. For what it's worth.

 

I think that blade looks really good. Especially the side that came out as you wished.

 

I agree that it should live, too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Kevin Colwell said:

well those welds are awesome!

The sanmai thing cause me nightmares (or at least headaches).

 

I have to do a lot of sanmai because it was standard on Chinese swords made for the army/emperor and most of the ones owned by wealthy people. I have gotten really obsessive. I have a milling machine, and for the last weld, the one that creates the sanmai billet, I mill all the pieces flat. Plus, I weigh them, and I make sure each of the outside plates is the same thickness and has the same mass. That way, the center plate is in the center given the mass and the volume. If you start it out that way, it will end up that way. Or, at least, it will end up that way unless you really work hard to shift it. Even then, I am not 100% certain you could shift it very far. That's been my experience, anyway. But, if there is a difference in the mass or volume on either side of the center, you are in trouble. For what it's worth.

 

I think that blade looks really good. Especially the side that came out as you wished.

 

I agree that it should live, too.

Thanks Kevin, really appreciate the advice and it makes very good sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I have some more progress on this build. I sourced the wood from an old rifle stock and decided on copper fittings. Now on to some carving.

B7517377-67A1-456E-8FAB-420B03A44EFF.jpeg

D3C56F8A-75B3-4254-8E41-B10E8E7EFF7A.jpeg

EA101D75-C699-48B0-AF33-F4E2E89859B3.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really liking this knife, Rob.  Anxious to see what you do in the way of carving.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the past I have almost exclusively used a dremel to carve but this time I have used some chisels and gouges I made from an old rasp. Very slow careful going but here

 is the progress so far.

 

 

E87E2A21-155E-4632-9159-68CA184C20E3.jpeg

42D7477F-F283-4352-BDE2-8ABAE526AC52.jpeg

ED3E29A2-4D1B-420C-A179-56C6BE552A5D.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like the design, Rob.  No offense intended, but you need some real wood carving tools.  You're tearing the wood fibers and not cutting them.  Your cuts should be almost shiny.  A set of Dockyard miniature tools would be an excellent choice for knife handle carving.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Chris Christenberry said:

I really like the design, Rob.  No offense intended, but you need some real wood carving tools.  You're tearing the wood fibers and not cutting them.  Your cuts should be almost shiny.  A set of Dockyard miniature tools would be an excellent choice for knife handle carving.

No offence taken and I appreciate the advice. Will look that up Chris. Thanks.Did some test clean up with sandpaper so will see how it comes up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got my ex a set of carving tools from Flexcut. They've changed their lineup over the years, but this is their basic set. And I can attest...these suckers are sharp! I actually tried to test the edge of the chip knife by running my thumb across the edge, like I've done with hundreds of knives...and it cut me like a laser!

 

https://www.flexcut.com/home/product/fr310-beginners-palm-set

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Rob Toneguzzo said:

No offence taken and I appreciate the advice. Will look that up Chris. Thanks.Did some test clean up with sandpaper so will see how it comes up.

 

I keep forgetting commercial links are allowed here on this forum.  Here's where I get mine.

 

https://mountainwoodcarvers.com/collections/dockyard

 

These are really miniature tools.  The handles are about the diameter of a pencil................but man are these tools perfect for what you are doing.

Edited by Chris Christenberry
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well here it is all finished. Had some challenges but I learnt heaps and am overall happy with the result.

 

I will be taking Chris’s advice and get some finer carving tools.

 

 

 

 

6664B4DA-B361-4E06-BB57-47093F87C65D.jpeg

E77BA086-FFC4-463D-9943-0C7601F8D47F.jpeg

8BBB1015-E514-4615-9CBF-BBF86E352CF6.jpeg

1EA7C141-DBD7-4451-A922-E30DCF32260D.jpeg

A12190B0-1539-4703-9A39-9E0C6EB56FC9.jpeg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like it, Rob.  I've never carved a knife handle, but will certainly consider it for the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...