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Hello,

 

I've been lurking here for awhile and have gathered up as much information as I could in preparation for making my first knife which I've considered doing for some time.  This site has been very helpful to me and I've read many posts which helped guide me in my efforts.  I had considered buying a Henckels Bob Kramer, the look and feel appealed to me, I chose however to attemp making something similar and save a few dollars while learning something new in the process.  Apologies for the unoriginal design, but as mentioned I set out to create a tribute to what I considered a beautiful chef's knife.  I still need to finish sanding and buffing but so far I'm pleased with the result.  I welcome suggestions and/or critique on what areas I can improve upon for my next project(s).  

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12 minutes ago, Dan Hertzson said:

That's your first knife?  Might as well consider quitting your day job...

 

Too kind but thank you.  With the amount

of time invested, I’m not sure I would make much of a go of it!

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Fantastic job Alberto

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Great work! 

 

Show us your next project! :)

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Thanks for the encouragement and kind words.  

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Beautiful work!

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That is outstanding for a first knife.  What is the steel?  How did you heat treat it?  What is the wood used for the handle?  Oh ya, over all specs would be nice too.

 

Doug

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Posted (edited)

Thank you!  The steel started out as a 1/4” plate of O1 steel I sourced from a local steel supply store.  For heat treat, I brought it up gradually in temperature in a kiln until non magnetic then quenched it in Canola oil.  From there it went into the oven at 400 degrees for an hour, I hope I got this right... it does seem to hold an edge nicely.  The wood comes from a chunk of Ziricote which was gifted to me by a family member who brought it from Belize. I was not aware of the process of using clay to develop a hamon line when I heat treated the knife so cheated and did the mustard thing for effect, next time I would like to try clay.  Finally the knife was sharpened on a progression of stones from 1000 up to an Arkansas stone. Here are some dimensions as requested.

FC9FAEA0-2E1D-4195-BE24-035A4638F409.jpeg

Edited by Alberto S

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With O1 you're not going to get a hamon by clay coating, it's too hardenable.  You could do an edge quench and etch to show the quench line though.

 

Doug

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30 minutes ago, Doug Lester said:

With O1 you're not going to get a hamon by clay coating, it's too hardenable.  You could do an edge quench and etch to show the quench line though.

 

Doug

 

Thanks Doug,

I appreciate the advice, by edge quench I'm assuming submerse only the edge into oil, thereby making the upper portion of the blade softer than the business end, correct? 

Alberto

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You got it!

 

Doug

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48 minutes ago, Doug Lester said:

You got it!

 

Doug

Thank you.

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On 5/12/2020 at 6:04 AM, Alberto S said:

so cheated and did the mustard thing for effect

I'm not sure I'd call that cheating.  Well done on the patterning!

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7 hours ago, billyO said:

I'm not sure I'd call that cheating.  Well done on the patterning!


Thank you, perhaps I shouldn’t have said cheating as I’m very happy with the outcome, however I’m thinking the alternate method with clay would have given me a more durable finish??  I’ve been keeping the blade oiled at all times and being vigilant about putting it away right after each use.  The forced patina on the blade seems to be holding out well, is it safe to assume that if I continue to do so this finish will last fairly long term or should I expect that at some point it will need redoing?

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Alberto S said:

is it safe to assume that if I continue to do so this finish will last fairly long term or should I expect that at some point it will need redoing?

 

I'm hoping Mr  @Joël Mercier will respond to this one.  IIRC, he does a lot of mustard patina....

Edited by billyO

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Any patina on a carbon steel kitchen knife will eventually turn a uniform brown.  The mustard doesn't wear off, it just blends.  Hamon or clay hardening on an appropriate steel (as Doug mentioned, O-1 is not appropriate for that) does the same.  If you want to keep a fresh-looking hamon, you will have to redo the polish every few years.  If you want to keep a fresh-looking mustard patina, you have to re-polish the blade and redo the mustard every few years.  Personally I like the deep chocolate brown an ancient carbon steel kitchen knife gets, but it does kind of spoil the look of a good hamon.  And wives tend to want knives to be shiny.  

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In my experience, the mustard patina will blend with the natural one that forms over time, like Alan said. It will take a good while before can't see it anymore though...

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great job. First knives are interesting. The variability is wide. Yours is near the top, it is quite nice. I am impressed.

mine were strictly functional and I decided to improve later due to a gentleman named JD Smith who pushed me.

 

That looks like my 10th. you are off and running!

7 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

And wives tend to want knives to be shiny.  

that is the real reason I have never made a kitchen knife for my own home :)

 

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Posted (edited)

Much of what I would have said has already been said, so I'll just ask a few questions and drop a few comments later, if you really want an in-depth critique..

Is this a forged blade? (if it is, that's a very big wow great job)

What is the brown spacer between the zircote and the brass?

Can you show a couple of pics from the underside, topside and butt of the handle?

How are the bolsters attached?

You can feel free to ignore these questions as they are only intended for me to provide a full critique.

 

I forgot to comment on the idea of edge quenching. I'm not a fan of this idea. At all.

Edited by Joshua States

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19 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Any patina on a carbon steel kitchen knife will eventually turn a uniform brown.  The mustard doesn't wear off, it just blends.  Hamon or clay hardening on an appropriate steel (as Doug mentioned, O-1 is not appropriate for that) does the same.  If you want to keep a fresh-looking hamon, you will have to redo the polish every few years.  If you want to keep a fresh-looking mustard patina, you have to re-polish the blade and redo the mustard every few years.  Personally I like the deep chocolate brown an ancient carbon steel kitchen knife gets, but it does kind of spoil the look of a good hamon.  And wives tend to want knives to be shiny.  

 

Thanks for the information Alan, that's funny my wife was concerned when I told her I was going to make the shiny stuff look old and rusty!  

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17 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

In my experience, the mustard patina will blend with the natural one that forms over time, like Alan said. It will take a good while before can't see it anymore though...

Thanks Joel, I'll wait to see how it ages, I like the idea of a chocolate brown appearance to the blade.

11 hours ago, Kevin Colwell said:

great job. First knives are interesting. The variability is wide. Yours is near the top, it is quite nice. I am impressed.

mine were strictly functional and I decided to improve later due to a gentleman named JD Smith who pushed me.

 

That looks like my 10th. you are off and running!

that is the real reason I have never made a kitchen knife for my own home :)

 

Thank you Kevin!

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Much of what I would have said has already been said, so I'll just ask a few questions and drop a few comments later, if you really want an in-depth critique..

Is this a forged blade? (if it is, that's a very big wow great job)

What is the brown spacer between the zircote and the brass?

Can you show a couple of pics from the underside, topside and butt of the handle?

How are the bolsters attached?

You can feel free to ignore these questions as they are only intended for me to provide a full critique.

 

I forgot to comment on the idea of edge quenching. I'm not a fan of this idea. At all.

 

The blade is stock reduction from 1/4" plate steel, initial shape was done with a grinder and cut off wheel, the rest was done on a 6x60 belt sander... I'm a woodworker so it was the only thing available to me for sanding, I would like to get a 2x72 sander one day. The spacer is a piece of Padauk, it's a little more orange/red in person but does turn more brown with time. 

The bolsters are attached via brass rods drilled through both bolster and blade, I also used epoxy to help keep them in place.  

Here are some additional photos.

 

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Edited by Alberto S

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Nice looking blade, especially for your first! 

For your heat treat, a 400 degree temper should bring your O1 to a good level of hardness for a kitchen blade. Ideally, your temper cycles should be longer than 1 hour (usually 2 hours), because 1 hour is the minimum amount of time required for tempering to fully resolve in most steels. And you should definitely be doing 2 tempering cycles for O1, your first tempering cycle will convert all martensite to tempered martensite, but upon cooling to room temperature (or lower), retained austenite in the blade will be converted to untempered martensite. A second tempering cycle is required to convert that untempered martensite to tempered martensite. As it stands, your knife likely has untempered martensite in it which can result in a reduction of desired mechanical properties. 

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