Jump to content

Butterfly/bowtie Felling Axe. Mild steel/5160 "photo heavy"


Recommended Posts

So back in 11/2018 I had a demonstration to do and I decided it was a Felling axe that my sights fell on.  It was the last demo of the year and all ready had snow on the ground. 

My buddy Scott came around to help with sledge..  We got the mandrel done and 1/4 the way to a finished axe before he had to boogie. 

Fast forwards to 5 days ago and my desire to to finish the Axe..  

I am about 96% happy with it.. I am not a fan of any hammer marks nor scale left on the work if it was designed in my mind. 


About 8hrs, all hand work. 

20181118_120243.jpg

20181122_130721.jpg

20200506_151126.jpg

20200506_160716.jpg

20200506_161037.jpg

20200506_162218.jpg

20200506_172414.jpg

20200507_155512.jpg

20200508_180831.jpg

20200508_180835.jpg

20200509_142536.jpg

20200509_142541.jpg

20200509_142601.jpg

20200509_142618.jpg

20200510_152028.jpg

20200510_152032.jpg

20200510_155829.jpg

20200510_155839.jpg

20200512_164917.jpg

20200512_194533.jpg

20200512_194609.jpg

20200512_194634.jpg

20200512_194639.jpg

20200512_194800.jpg

20200512_194814.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is for sure. 4 3/4lbs.. I was shooting for 5lbs.  Final cleaning today.. I wanted to see the grain structure of the mild steel.. 

Kind of neat. 

Thanks Alan. 

 

20200513_172707.jpg

20200513_172718.jpg

20200513_172724.jpg

20200513_172729.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
On 5/14/2020 at 4:45 AM, Rob Toneguzzo said:

Very nice work Jennifer.

Thanks Rob,  She swings real nice. 

On 5/14/2020 at 11:53 AM, billyO said:

Nice!  Always fun to finally finish a feller 

(:blink:...sorry)

Thanks,, It is fun to finish a feller and get to makes chips for sure. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

That came out pretty dang nice Jennifer. I like those raised welding ribs. I hadn't seen that method or shape before.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the central ridge you've incorporated.  A detail that is usually missed in making felling axes is that oval shape that have they have in cross section.  I always believed that was done to act as a release so the head wouldn't get stuck in green wood. 

 

Your handle also looks nice and springy!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

10 hours ago, Joshua States said:

That came out pretty dang nice Jennifer. I like those raised welding ribs. I hadn't seen that method or shape before.


its a rather old commercial way of doing it. 

While I weld the eye closed using the scarfs before inserting the steel which then leaving a gap for the steel to sit in in a separate welding heat.

Using this method when perfected the steel and eye weld can be completed at the same time. 
 

9 hours ago, Daniel W said:

I like the central ridge you've incorporated.  A detail that is usually missed in making felling axes is that oval shape that have they have in cross section.  I always believed that was done to act as a release so the head wouldn't get stuck in green wood. 

 

Your handle also looks nice and springy!

thanks,  You are right on the bevel and rounded out center section of the blade.. It does help to keep the blade from sticking and leverages out of a cut easier. 

I am often dismayed today that most axes and hatches made are flat bladed.. Not really great for deep cuts with little sticking. 

Its nice seeing someone else who understands this. 

I left his a little straighter along the cutting edge than I like with not as much Ovaling but she sure cuts nice..   This axe also has some extra material for wear.. It will take about 10 to 15 resharpenings and then it will be it's correct shape..  As it is now it has a leading top cutting edge which works well. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, JenniferP said:

thanks,  You are right on the bevel and rounded out center section of the blade.. It does help to keep the blade from sticking and leverages out of a cut easier. 

I am often dismayed today that most axes and hatches made are flat bladed.. Not really great for deep cuts with little sticking. 
 

 

I always wondered if I was correct, or at least if someone out there could confirm with me about that. 

 

I first noticed the oval shape when I was rehanging an old turn of the century axe head. I wondered for a while and was convinced it was intentionally done. It was an old warren axe, which since that time, bit the dust and broke the blade in a black locust tree. Today you see some commercial axe heads made trying to copy the idea with big recess cut into the cheeks of the axe.

 

A strong leading edge and a nice arch was something I noticed with my own little fabricated build. A nice arch seems to bite right into wood, where a bigger heavier axe at twice it's weight just bounced off. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Daniel W said:

 

I always wondered if I was correct, or at least if someone out there could confirm with me about that. 

 

I first noticed the oval shape when I was rehanging an old turn of the century axe head. I wondered for a while and was convinced it was intentionally done. It was an old warren axe, which since that time, bit the dust and broke the blade in a black locust tree. Today you see some commercial axe heads made trying to copy the idea with big recess cut into the cheeks of the axe.

 

A strong leading edge and a nice arch was something I noticed with my own little fabricated build. A nice arch seems to bite right into wood, where a bigger heavier axe at twice it's weight just bounced off. 



Post up a photo of the broken axe if you can.. It might be repairable.   Also if you don't mind me asking what were the weather conditions when it broke? Winter perhaps? 

I made this ax for heavy felling work.. With this said.  the blade as explained before is designed for wear and the top, tip is always the wearing point with bad swings and such when a tree is on the ground and one is tired.  

This leading cutting edge is super handy for limbing as it gives just a little extra lead so leads to a slicing action. 

For overall size it's pretty light at only 3.75lbs head weight and is designed to be sharpened then redressed at least 2 times over it's life span..  Something which was not done that often since most would just buy a new ax or would get an older one resteeled. 

here you can see both the Hatchax and the Felling axe have a leading edge..  The ax head is mounted square to the handle so it is actually the cutting edge that is pulled forwards some. 

You can see the smaller Hatchax doe not have a leading edge any longer..  This hatchax is in need of a forge redress and heat treatment. 



 

20200707_115930.jpg

20200707_115938.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol: The conditions where a bond fire where the next morning I found the axe stuck in a locust trunk of about 1 1/2 foot diameter.  My friends and I put the axes away after the craziness would start.  I almost suspect that someone slammed it into a rock and didn't tell me. Or I did something I don't remember . . . thank god those days are done. 

 

The blade had a flaw in it to begin with. Sometime in it's life, it was stuck with a steel hammer to either remove the head or just abuse. From the bottom edge about 1/3 into the body, there was a minor mushrooming, from it a crack that extended to the blade. I lost about an 1 1/4 of the bottom of the blade, the crack extended beyond that.  

 

Since that time, I cut the bottom of the axe off completely, and now it sits on my project bench waiting for a time I can try to reforge it into something piratical.

 

 

Your axes are certainly made with use in mind, that's defiantly something I'm wanting to work toward as I dabble with some green wood working from time to time. I think I'd take that hatchet in a second!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

What was the starting stock dimensions? 

 

Thank you!!!

I wanna say 3/4"X2" X 10"

I had taken notes back when I started the project but I don't remember if it was the clip board or in the journal.. 

I can look tomorrow.. I know it was 3/4"X2" but not sure on length. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...