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Wheee!!!! Have fun!  Can't wait to see pics.

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I’ve learnt so much today;

1. 1075 steel is hard

2. keep you work clean

3. flying scale hurts

4. my forge is a beast 

5. never make the handle first

6. steel has a personality 

7. Bladesmithing is sooo much fun 

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Also normalizing isn’t that scary

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Cool. Good start. The folding over at the handle can lead to cold shuts (voids) in the steel. These could act as stress risers, etc. causing failure. You need to concentrate on keeping your hammer blows centred and also flatten these out from the flat side as they develop (hammer on the edge, turn 90’, hammer flat, repeat) to stop this happening. 

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Not bad, not bad at all for a newbie. Having said that self praise is no recommendation. Over to you all for appraisal.

Going to normalize again then heat treat. 

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So, some things I need to consider. The spine is currently 2.5mm, clearly to thick. I’m anxious about the heat treat, I couldn't bare the thought of the blade failing at this point. I’m sooo happy with the blade at the moment and I’m thinking spending more time thinning down the spine could compromise the blade and equally cause an error with the grind.

Do I just accept what it is, or strive for a more “perfect” result?

I should have spent more time at the anvil thinning down the stock.

Grinding is tedious but rewarding. You start with this scaled hammered thing, looking something like a knife into this beautiful thing that is clearly a knife. 
A bought about a dozen belts from 60 to 120, thinking I need to up the budget on belts. 
I don’t want to rush the outcome but want to get an acceptable result. Trying to understand the balance between “it is what it is” and “ I can do better”.

My apologies for the long winded post, I’m just so pleased with where I am and what I’ve produced. Can’t thank you all enough for you support and guidance.

 

P.S. Alan, my grinder is S@$t, but got the job done.

 

Looking forward to your comments.
 

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On 7/31/2020 at 1:28 AM, David Heron said:

 

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:unsure:

You ground out your tang which is ok, but probably took more time than what it would to forge it to shape. Charles is right in how to avoid working cold shuts in like this.  Even if the stock size is really thin and starts to act like a potato chip, remember that what you do in one plane of the stock, you have to do in the opposite plane too.  Sort of like an equation what you do to one side you still have to do to the other.

 

So if you hit a few times (3 or 4 times) to establish your set down count the number of blows, and then repeat the number on the flat of the stock.  This should keep the stock from folding over. If you do get a fold to start - then cut your losses and grind it out.  If you have an old worn out file, you can hot rasp it and it will be like your a grinder on steroids.

 

The tip of you knife looks good and so does the grinding handle etc all looks good. Keep it going!

Edited by Daniel W

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The finished (mostly) product looks good!  Nice even grinds, good lines.  I wouldn't grind more, that's just asking for trouble in the quench.  Call it a heavy chopper.  

 

How thick is your starting stock?  Anything thinner than around 3mm is a pain to forge on edge like that, for that very reason.  Good save, though!

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I'd leave it too, especially if it's your first knife.  Take the lessons you learned and fo it differently on your next one.  I try to concentrate on one or new details on every knife.  Any more than that and it can become too much and I'd never get anything done.

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Thanks so much for your advice, thinking I’m going to do as you suggest. I started to forge out the tang but things got pear shaped quickly do I decided to cut it off with the angle grinder then grind. So a bit more like stock removal rather than bladesmithing, but what the hey, whatever works. I still have a long way to go with my hammer and anvil skills. I did forge out the rest of the knife and couldn’t be happier with the outcome. 

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Not sure if anyone is online at the minute, but I just normalized again and it developed scale only on one side, should I grind it out now or just go to temper and do it after?

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Just gave it a quick grind, being careful to keep it cool. Just hardened the blade, went really well. A file scatted off and gave that ring of heard on videos. No cracks or warps. It’s off to the oven now. I’m so excited, it’s like being a kid on Christmas morning.

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Ok, firstly my apologies for the ever frequent posts, I’m all a bit anxious. I read a lot in the fit and finish posts (love the idea of a water cooled grinder) as to what to do post hardening and thought best thing to do was hand sand. I’ve built a couple of boats before, 30% timber, 20% resin, 50% sandpaper, I like hand sanding. First grind pre heat treat was at 120, thinking next time I’d take it to 240,  Sanding out the “vertical” grind lines is tedious. Next time I would leave some meat on the shallow end of the blade, I was lucky the blade stayed true during the hardening process. I’m thinking I got the blade too hot which caused the scale. Anyhow I love the thing it’s gorgeous, bit of a fat spine but “it is what it is”. Came as a complete surprise to me but post hardening and tempering the blade takes on this fabulous hue, a grey blue depth it didn’t have. 
 

once again my apologies for being needy
 

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Just as an aside, I had a magnetic knife rack hanging around, it was brilliant to hold the blade whilst hand sanding. Not sure if there is a reason not to do this, but really worked well.

 

its ok, 9F3F7A95-CC65-4A20-BEA2-9CA4A82342DE.jpegyou can thank me later

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Looking good so far!  I've been toying with using magnets to hold my blades.  I dont mind using them before heat treat, but after heat treat I'm not a fan of the magnetism that they impart into the blade.  Although it's not much, I dont have access to a demag machine and it's just something I prefer not to have in a finished knife.

A couple of little tips:  If you dont plan on doing any real grinding after heat treating, do a large part of your hand sanding before hardening.  I think the softer steel sands a bit easier.  Also, use a descale treatment after you temper to remove whatever scale you get from hardening.  It'll save you from going back to the grinder and ruining the hand sanding that you've already done.

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What Alex said.  I take most blades to 400 grit before heat treating.  I use anti-scale powder so I don't need the post-HT vinegar soak, but it works well and saves sandpaper.

 

Also what Alex said, looking good!

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4 hours ago, David Heron said:

I like hand sanding.

Good.  That makes finishing a lot more fun!:)

 

4 hours ago, David Heron said:

once again my apologies for being needy

Not at all.  But is does make it hard for some of us who want to help to reply to posts when you beat us to it;)

 

2 hours ago, Alex Middleton said:

Although it's not much, I dont have access to a demag machine and it's just something I prefer not to have in a finished knife.

You can demagnetize them by running the blade along the same magnet. If it doesn't work the first time, just flip the magnet around and repeat.  You will demganetize the blade when you get the poles lined up so they neutralize each other (between the blade and magnet, that is).  

 

4 hours ago, David Heron said:

bit of a fat spine but “it is what it is”

I was going to encourage you to thin it down a bit before HT.  If it stayed straight, you are ahead of the game.  If it had warped, you would then have learned how to correct these during the tempering cycles.  

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Thank you all for your kind words.

Alex I’ve taken the blade down to 240, so wished I had of gone to 400 prior to ht. Magnetic knife holder worked a treat but it obviously attracts the waste from sanding, thinking it will cause issues with scratching. 
Alan, 1075 started off at 5.4 mm, there available a 3.4 mm version for next blade. What is anti scale powder? 
Billy, I’m assuming we live in different hemispheres and time zones making the posts a little difficult to coordinate. 

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David, this stuff:

https://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-tools-supplies/metal-prep-coloring/heat-treating-accessories/anti-scale-coating-sku100002607-23076-49084.aspx?cm_mmc=cse-_-Itwine-_-shopzilla-_-100-002-607&utm_medium=cse&utm_source=connexity&utm_campaign=itwine&utm_content=100-002-607

or this, from a fellow forum member:

http://nuclayer.twinoaksforge.com/

 

These are liquid or powder compounds that prevent oxygen from reaching the surface of the steel, thus preventing scale and decarburization.  Very handy!  

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So, maybe 4 months ago I started by building a forge, bought an anvil, made an anvil stand, fashioned three hammers and four sets of tongs (slotted jaw tongs are my absolute favorite) mucked around trying to develop some skills and the following is the result.

 

The good;

overall pleasant lines

handle is beautiful


The bad;

spine is too thick 

choil is poorly shaped

the brass collar is a poor fit in part

the heel is poorly formed

 

The ugly

theres a tiny crack At the point

there’s  a grind mark close to the collar
the fit between the collar and tang isn’t great

 

All that said I’m delighted with the result. I’ve put a edge on using a Japanese whetstone 1K then to 6K. It cuts really well however the thickness of the spine makes it awkward to use and it’s not particularly balanced.

At the risk of becoming repetitive, I truly thank you all for your contributions. 
Now for the next project, hmmm either going to make a big brother for this one or make the same knife again but lookin for a better finished product.

 

 

 

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He he he, another addicted soul :)

 

You'll go far with this.

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