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Hey y'all, new knife completed.

This one is forged from 5160, with a copper bolster, leopardwood handle, and a sterling silver pin.

The blade is not quite as hard as I'd like, a file skates over it pretty well, but it still takes some tiny dents on a brass rod chop. This is the first blade I've completed in 5160, still trying to get a handle on the HT process. 

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Alex, great job contouring the handle, and the tang insertion the guard, no gaps. Very clean little package! Run thru your heating process start to finish, maybe we can give some insight?

Tom

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Thanks guys! Appreciate it. Im definitely improving a lot w each knife.

HT:

1. Thermal cycle- 3x, first just above nonmagnetic, second right to NM, third just below. Cool to black each time.

 

2. Quench- heat slightly above NM with the "dragons breath" at the mouth of my forge, edge quench in warm canola oil. (I got the oil just a little too hot to touch, I figure thats around 130-150F.)

I think it was Alan Longmire who recommended that 5160 be quenched at 1550F, so that's what I was aiming for, but I was just eyeballing it.

 

3. Temper- straight from quench into the oven, 2 cycles at 400F. I noticed a slight bend after this, which may have been from me pressing the blade against a magnet a bit too hard, while at nonmagnetic temps. So I did a couple 15-min temper cycles, with the blade shimmed and clamped with a counter-bend. Straightened it out nicely

 

Thanks,

 

Alex

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Yep, if you are going to make knives you are going to have to learn how to straighten out the blades.  The shimming and counter bending in the tempering oven is my favorite method too.

 

Doug

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40 minutes ago, Doug Lester said:

Yep, if you are going to make knives you are going to have to learn how to straighten out the blades.  The shimming and counter bending in the tempering oven is my favorite method too.

 

Doug

Haha it was like magic! Just straightened right out..

I also quenched it in the sink between heats, at 400F.

Is that advisable? I read something about that reducing cold embrittlement, but I dont think that'll be an issue for me in south FL. I was just impatient, and I read that it wouldn't hurt.

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