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This is the 3rd time of firing up the forge making sure all castable is cured, would it be beneficial to apply Satanite the walls ? I know I don't want to cover the floor with it sense it is easily damaged by flux.  I still have not applied kiln wash either. I have noticed very little Dragons breath so far but I have not opened the needle valve more than 3 full turns.

On the safety side of things: I installed a 3/8  electromagnetic gas valve and a an air proof switch for safety should we loos power or the fan motor fail the gas will cut off. 

I have no tongs to yet to reach in to the forge, this will be my first project, to forge out my tools. hopefully 3/8 re-bar will work for this, pleas correct me if I wrong, If I'm wrong, I also have 7/16 spring steel. also still search for that "Anvil" 

I would love to here you suggestions and recommendations

 

20200626_191044.jpg

 

7-3-20 Terry Way Gas Forge.gif

Parts_for_the_Anvil_Stand[1].jpg

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If you've lined it with castable you don't need anything on top, unless you want to add an IR reflective coating like ITC-100 or Plistix.  These can get you an extra hundred degrees or so, but are not usually necessary.  

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  • 1 month later...

BTW:

I mixed saturated sodium silicate and pure Alumina to a thick past painted this on the interior, allowed it to dry and fired it up after it glazed over,  I cranked it up and it reaches a faint yellow, near white heat.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Hi TerryWay/Alan,

 

I posted this is a different section but i'll post it here too for more visibility. 

 

 i have a 1.5" coupling on the back, about 1.5" of inside plenum space about the refract, and then 21 crayon sized holes (5/16" D). My surface area math says that the inlet is equivalent to ~23 crayon holes so i figured by going down a couple of crayons, that will provide back pressure enough to keep the ribbon burning running. Is it possible to have too much backpressure? what would i see if so?

 

I ran the forge for awhile the other day. my flame cones looked stable, weren't too greenish or spitting yellow flames and weren't wavy blue as if there was too much air. it ran real well for awhile but right around 2100 degrees, the flame blew back into the plenum. i shut the forge down, did something else, and then fired it up again. sure enough - ran well for an hour but when it started to get up to ~2100, it blew back again.

 

I have no idea what the issue could be at this point. Any assistance would be well appreciated. 

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Good day Bogamin, it may be that there is not have enough airflow thru the plenum, I would be inclined to increase the air pressure in the plenum first before anything else. The objective is to have a high fresh air/fuel flow/pressure thru the plenum to keep it "cool" and keep the flam outside the plenum in the forge. It is a balancing act. You may also try applying a  kiln wash, ITC-100 or Plistix that may help reduce or slow heat migrating into the plenum. I'm still not reaching a welding heat in my forge yet so I have broke down the air /fuel delivery system and I am shortening pipe, hoping to reduce the air flow restrictions in the pipe and thro the bends to achieve a higher (head pressure) or plenum pressure. 

The ribbon burner block cracked while cutting the pipe, so in re-casting a new burner, I plane to add some addental Alumina to my cast-o-lite for the 1st 1" of the Burner face section and the balance of the burner will be regular cast-o-lite.

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1 hour ago, TerryWay said:

there is not have enough airflow thru the plenum

 

This.  You're getting too hot, without enough volume to keep the flame front where it needs to be, so you're getting flashback.  Turn up the air, add some cooling fins, or something.  While you can turn down the pressure to run quiet, you do have to have enough airflow to keep the back of the burner block cool enough not to cause ignition.  It's all a balancing act.

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And the balancing act changes as the forge interior heats up and starts radiating heat onto your burner block.  When your forge heat increases you may need to adjust the air/gas flow to compensate.  Personally I am a fan of having a short length of the small tubes for your burner block, but I haven't had a chance to do the experimentation to validate that this optimizes the design.

 

Note that preignition can be even more of a problem for operation where you bring your forge up to a high temperature then try to turn it down...

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