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Hey everyone, just wanted to introduce myself as a new member. Brand new to smithing and metal work but hoping I can learn from others here on my journey. I found the forum by way of Red Beard OPS on youtube. I'm based in Indiana, been fascinated by bladesmithing for a long while and just got my very first home shop to work out of so I'm looking to make the most of it. I've been absorbing all the youtube tutorials but I'd like to find some books to keep as a reference, I'd welcome your suggestions.

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A book that is rather plentiful book for general blacksmithing is "the back yard black smith" by lorelei sims.  It a very inexpensive book and has general info on black smith work.  Shop set up tooling, general info on low carbon steels. I suggest to get familiar with some fundamentals that book should be a good introduction. 

 

The Mark Aspery series is very in-depth detailed.  Its focus is again on blacksmith work.

 

For blade smithing, check out the book series "The complete blade smith." 

 

There is a whole other spot in this forum for books related to the subject.  These are just good starting points.

Edited by Daniel W
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9 minutes ago, Daniel W said:

A book that is rather plentiful book for general blacksmithing is "the back yard black smith" by lorelei sims.  It a very inexpensive book and has general info on black smith work.  Shop set up tooling, general info on low carbon steels. I suggest to get familiar with some fundamentals that book should be a good introduction. 

 

The Mark Aspery series is very in-depth detailed.  Its focus is again on blacksmith work.

 

For blade smithing, check out the book series "The complete blade smith." 

 

There is a whole other spot in this forum for books related to the subject.  These are just good starting points.

Great. I appreciate the reply.

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Welcome, JD.  I'd recommend finding and joining your local blacksmithing group, and attend as many meetings as you can.  You'll learn a whole lot in a couple of days with experienced smiths,  you'll meet folks who have more tools than you do, and most are willing to help out newer smiths, either with instruction, tools, or help in making/getting them.  

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11 minutes ago, billyO said:

Welcome, JD.  I'd recommend finding and joining your local blacksmithing group, and attend as many meetings as you can.  You'll learn a whole lot in a couple of days with experienced smiths,  you'll meet folks who have more tools than you do, and most are willing to help out newer smiths, either with instruction, tools, or help in making/getting them.  

Thanks billyO, I am working on finding a smithing club in my area. Which could be more difficult or easier than I assume being as that I live out in the sticks.

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2 hours ago, Daniel W said:

 

The Mark Aspery series is very in-depth detailed.  Its focus is again on blacksmith work.

 


I can't endorse this option enough!
They are a little more pricey, but they truly break things down in an easy to understand way.
Also, in my experience(much less than a lot of guys here :)), keep in mind that Blade-smithing is generally black-smithing but  with fewer processes involved; so don't be afraid to forgo specific blade-smithing books to learn the basics first.  In general we do tapering, isolating, and spreading/lengthening.(there's potential for lots of fancy other things, but this will get you most any stick/stub/hidden or full tang knife you could want, maybe even an integral)
 Once I got Mark Aspery's first book and he broke down those processes things became A LOT easier:D

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Welcome to the quest!

 

I'd start with these two books, with two caveats on the Boye book. First, no need to use scrap steel as he suggests. Good steel is readily available and cheap. Check out https://newjerseysteelbaron.com/. Second, Boye recommends Aqua Regia (combination of Nitric and Hydrochloric) acid for etching knives. That stuff is alien blood dangerous. Buy Ferric Chloride instead. Easy to find on Amazon.

 

Finally, this forum has been in operation for many years, and almost anything you want to know about bladesmithing is on here somewhere, the trouble is finding it. Our internal search engine isn't the best. Try this: Go to google and type: SITE:Bladesmithsforum.com "the thing you want to search for"  That will use Google to return results only from this site. Use quotations around the search terms if you want an exact match, remove them if you want those words but not in that order.

 

Dave

 

https://www.amazon.com/Step-Knifemaking-You-Can-Do/dp/0615116590/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=step+by+step+knifemaking&qid=1595721156&sr=8-1

 

https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Bladesmith-Forging-Your-Perfection/dp/099870816X/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=the+complete+bladesmith&qid=1595721118&sr=8-2

 

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J.D.

Like Daniel W said, The Backyard Blacksmith is an extremely good book. I'm new here myself and got started in bladesmithing about 2-1/2 years ago and a friend suggested this book to me. Very good read and a wealth of information and knowledge in it. I know how you feel about getting in contact with a local Blacksmith club... I'm located in South Central Illinois out in the sticks too !! 

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Never doubt your local clubs.  I find enough info and little projects to undertake just in the monthly news letters that I can't get to them. Once you join up, you will find that events are held all over the place.

 

The trouble lately is just the state of the state is in to be involved with meetings.

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What Daniel said.  My local guild covers the corner of three states, where Tennessee, North Carolina, and Virginia come together.  You'll find there will usually be a meeting within a two-hour drive from you wherever you are in the eastern US, four or five hours out west.  When we can have meetings, that is.  

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