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Sorry, I wasn't too clear...use the highest grit that affects the scratches on the blade effectively, then move to higher grits. Your surface is already fairly clean, so keep your sanding direction along the length, all in the same direction. Clean carefully when changing grits, change water, and add some sodium bicarbonate to keep flash rust down.

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2 minutes ago, SteveShimanek said:

Sorry, I wasn't too clear...use the highest grit that affects the scratches on the blade effectively, then move to higher grits. Your surface is already fairly clean, so keep your sanding direction along the length, all in the same direction. Clean carefully when changing grits, change water, and add some sodium bicarbonate to keep flash rust down.

Okey i will try it later 

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11 hours ago, Hilda said:

do you mean start with the highest and down to the lowest grit

This depends on the part of the world you are in, and how the grit is labeled.  What you want is to start with the most coarse grit and work up to the most fine grit.  However, don't start any more coarse than necessary to remove the current scratch marks.

 

Some paper is labeled by how many particles it takes to make up an inch.  In this scheme, the higher the number, the finer the grit.

 

Other paper is labeled in how many microns wide the grit particles are.  In this scheme, the lower the number the finer the grit.

 

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17 minutes ago, Brian Dougherty said:

This depends on the part of the world you are in, and how the grit is labeled.  What you want is to start with the most coarse grit and work up to the most fine grit.  However, don't start any more coarse than necessary to remove the current scratch marks.

 

Some paper is labeled by how many particles it takes to make up an inch.  In this scheme, the higher the number, the finer the grit.

 

Other paper is labeled in how many microns wide the grit particles are.  In this scheme, the lower the number the finer the grit.

 

I live in Austria and I have sandpaper from 800-8000

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Unless there is something about abrasive paper down under that I don't know about, you would want to start with the 800.  I'm not a hamon polishing expert, but I don't think you will need to go nearly as fine as 8000.

 

Edited by Brian Dougherty
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13 minutes ago, Brian Dougherty said:

down under

Austria, as in Europe.  So if the paper is P800, that would be pretty dang fine and P8000 would be super fine.  

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2 minutes ago, Jerrod Miller said:

Austria, as in Europe.  So if the paper is P800, that would be pretty dang fine and P8000 would be super fine.  

Yes is let's say I start with 800 from left to right I have to change the direction dan who I go to the next grain?

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2 hours ago, Jerrod Miller said:

Austria, as in Europe.  So if the paper is P800, that would be pretty dang fine and P8000 would be super fine.  

Egad!  I need to start wearing my cheaters when I'm at the computer :(

 

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Here in the US, the standard is the higher the number, the finer the grit.  As an example, on my knives I start hand sanding with 220 then go: 440 -> 800 -> 1500 -> 5000.  

 

Here's a sketch of what we mean by changing directions. 

Untitled.jpg

 

I can't stress enough the importance to make sure you can see no scratches of the prior direction before changing to the next grit.  Use lots of light and make sure you see the light reflected off the entire blade to make sure all the previous scratches are gone.

Good luck and have fun!

 

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1 minute ago, billyO said:

Here in the US, the standard is the higher the number, the finer the grit.  As an example, on my knives I start hand sanding with 220 then go: 440 -> 800 -> 1500 -> 5000.  

 

Here's a sketch of what we mean by changing directions. 

Untitled.jpg

 

I can't stress enough the importance to make sure you can see no scratches of the prior direction before changing to the next grit.  Use lots of light and make sure you see the light reflected off the entire blade to make sure all the previous scratches are gone.

Good luck and have fun!

 

Okey I was just thinking from left to right

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If I were you I'd read what Steve said again.  I agree with him, given the state of that blade you don't need to start too rough, and sanding in only one direction is fine.  For this blade.  Steve does Japanese sword restoration professionally, you see.  

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4 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Steve does Japanese sword restoration professionally, you see.

If he says only go lengthwise down the blade and not criss-cross, then listen to him, for sure.

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4 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

If I were you I'd read what Steve said again.  I agree with him, given the state of that blade you don't need to start too rough, and sanding in only one direction is fine.  For this blade.  Steve does Japanese sword restoration professionally, you see.  

Mean start with the low and up to higest ?

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7 hours ago, Hilda said:

Mean start with the low and up to higest ?

Okey So in my case of 800 and up to 8000 high, change the direction of the grain change?

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When using very fine grits after establishing the shape and foundation polish, it is better to go in one direction (along the length and back) while ensuring coarser scratches are not left behind; this is all wet sanding with water with baking soda added to minimize flash rusting, and a lot of rinsing and changing water at each grit change.

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