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Marc Mancini

saying hello (again)

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Hello,

 

I used to be Hickstick on here back in the early Oughts. I put away my forge and scrapped a lot of my 'projects' when I had my daughter and no longer had the time to forge.  

 

Well...she's now 17 and doing her own things (really...I just embarrass her  in front of her friends with bad dad jokes :) ) and I have more free time.  I recently picked up wood carving and thinking about forging some carver blades, so I dug out my one brick forge and propage torch and some steel, my old block anvil and started beating.  I've got a few in the works right now, along with some I'd forged and never finished.  heres a couple I've been working on.  forged from 01 bar stock.  Been having a tough time with annealing to drill the scale holes.  I dug out my old Ash bucket and heated them up and buried them in wood ash over the weekend, but haven't had a chance to check them yet.

 

Its fun to be back forging again. 

 

 

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Welcome back.  Watch out or you'll get all addicted again.  We are on similar ends of the kid tunnel.  My girls will turn 22 in a few weeks, and life is good.

 

FWIW, most would tell you not to do a slow cool in ashes anymore.  Something about layers of carbides forming.  The common wisdom of the day seems to be to simply normalize before you do do the machine work, and that will leave the steel about as soft as possible without a tightly controlled oven. 

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Welcome back!  I can merge the accounts if you want, just let me know.  

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1 hour ago, Brian Dougherty said:

FWIW, most would tell you not to do a slow cool in ashes anymore.  Something about layers of carbides forming.  The common wisdom of the day seems to be to simply normalize before you do do the machine work, and that will leave the steel about as soft as possible without a tightly controlled oven. 

 

Interesting Brian...the first time I tried Id left the the end of the tang sticking out and that ended up being the only part I could drill through.  I google searched and only found slow cooling inside the forge, but with the one-brick I didn't think that would work.  Every other knife I've finished had been mystery steel from truck leaf or coil spring and never had a problem with the ash annealing.  I thought I was dealing with air hardening at first.

 

Thanks Alan...I'm not sure its necessary as I really didn't post that much content to begin with...

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Whatever you want to do! 

 

And yes, O1 does air harden in knifeblade thickness, so plain normalizing doesn't work on it.  Neither does ash annealing. That makes the carbides precipitate in sheets rather than as the spheres you want.  About all you can do to it without a kiln is to air cool, then overtemper by bringing it up to a low red heat and slow cooling from there.  This is sort of a subcritical anneal, and will wreck fewer drill bits, but O1 once forged is a pain to drill no matter what.  

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Welcome back Marc. I'm in much the same boat, wanting to get back into things after an unexpectedly long layoff, but life is not making it easy right now. Been picking up some nice wood for handles though here and there and have some Parks 50 on the way.

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LOL...you guys where spot on BTW...just tried drilling my pin holes after the ash 'anneal' and it was a no go...barely even scratched the surface.  I know you can hot file, but is there such a thing as hot drilling?  lol  or may I should hot punch and drift a slot in the tang and drill the pin holes through the wood scales?

 

guess I'm going to either be making hidden tangs with O1 going forward or figuring out that subcritical anneal that Alan mentioned.  

 

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Hmm, hot drilling... how about hot punching tang holes? I also seem to recall David Boye spot blowing holes in the tangs of his hardened saw blade knives with an oxy acetylene torch, lol.

 

I like your idea of simply switching to stick tangs when forging O1. I tried a bit of forging with O1 when I was first trying things out but switched to 5160 and 1084 pretty quick for ease of forging and heat treating. That fully spheroidized precision ground 01 stock is great for stock removal. I need to make some small wood carving knives for my own use at some point and considered using my leftover O1 to make some quick blades with that method.

 

 

Edited by Guy Thomas

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You can try hot drilling, but I'd be worried about the bit grabbing and swinging a red-hot blade at me... :ph34r::lol:

 

The overtemper thing is easy, just use a propane torch to heat the tang until it just barely starts to glow in a dark room and let it air cool.  That will let you get one or two holes per bit instead of the other way around.

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