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wrought iron early medieval axes


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Hi

I would like to present my new tutorial about how to forge the "Slavic" type cap axe. The cap forging technique I used is one of the many. It is not copy of specific archaeological fond but rather an inspiration of axe from Pien (Poland). Enjoy watching :-)

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I finally made time to watch this today.  Good job!  May I ask why you put the thin piece of steel between the axe sides when you welded up the body, when that was not going to be the edge steel?  Just for a better weld?  

 

I have seen three different ways of making the back of the eye like that.  I like this method, looks like the least work.  Aside from all the filing, of course.  

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1 hour ago, Alan Longmire said:

I finally made time to watch this today.  Good job!  May I ask why you put the thin piece of steel between the axe sides when you welded up the body, when that was not going to be the edge steel?  Just for a better weld?  

 

I have seen three different ways of making the back of the eye like that.  I like this method, looks like the least work.  Aside from all the filing, of course.  

 

Yes Alan it is for better weld and for avoiding to burn thin parts of the axe eye.  The wrought iron I used has very low C content, that is why to weld it must be heated to high temperature (burning temperature), but if you put the thin sheet medium steel between two pieces of wrought iron the welding temperature can be lower. 

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I watched this yesterday. It's a great video. 

 

7 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

I like this method, looks like the least work.  Aside from all the filing, of course.  

I was thinking about cutting the notch with that angle grinder and just cleaning it up with the files.

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New project, the Viking Age perforated battle cross axe.

The original archeological find was found in Sweden and is stored in the State Historical Museum in Stockholm. 

To forging it i used several wrought iron hinges and wrought iron parts of an old wooden barn gate (axe body), wrought iron rail (cross and lower part of the axe) and steel rail (cutting age).

original find http://mis.historiska.se/mis/sok/bild.asp?uid=350066

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  • 3 months later...

I got a notification from YT yesterday and saw it this morning. I love the music almost as much as the forging. I did some work today on an axe that I was asked to do for a video demo. Someday, I might even be as good as you!

 

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Great Moravian battle-axe, I used good quality wrought iron and old steel (19-cent), I started to forge it with flat bar 2 cm x 6 cm.  The axe eye is punch and drift.

The original archaeological find i based on. If you are interested of this kind of axes, here you can find axe catalog from Czech Republic. 

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10 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

I've always admired that axe style, and you have done an excellent job of it.  B)

thanks Alan, it was not my first attempt at forging this kind of axes. There are many ways to get the same result but this one is, in my opinion, the best and historically correct (the eye is punch and drift).

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