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so I am still pretty knew to knife making and have a limited arsenal of tools. I have enough to get the job done; like a 1x30 belt grinder, angle grinder, hand held drill, files, and sand paper. I heat treat with charcoal and a hair dryer for right now. Long story short, as I am new, any critiques (constructive) of my current works in progress? A chefs knife and a pair of larger pairing knives. Thank you in advance for and help. By the way, I'm using 1084 steel since I'm using charcoal to heat treat.

20200801_102057.jpg

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A little too much belley in the handle of the chef knife for my taste but the blade profiles look good. Try taking the pics without the shadow so the profiles are more easily seen.

Edited by Garry Keown
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I'm relatively new to making kitchen knives, so grain of salt disclaimer
I really like the pairing knives personally, and I'd be excited to use those to slice up apples and peel potatoes :)
Looking at the blade shape of the Chef's knife I'm wondering how effectively I could use the tip with the current angle of the up-sweep..I might put the tip a little closer in line with the middle of the blade, or elongate the curve so its not so severe?  I'm sure a lot of it is personal preference and how you use your knives, but it's the first thing to catch my eye :) 

This is great work, especially with the limited tools listed!  I can't wait to see the finished products!:D

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Lots of good advice here! One thing I might add is that an important feature of a chef's knife is how the knife stops at the end of a chop. Some of this is up to taste, but I've found that with the wrong geometry in the area close to the handle, you can get a situation where the blade doesn't have a good "stop" at the end of each chop and you can end up rocking your knuckles into the cutting board. It's hard to tell from pictures, but with a mostly curved edge like your knife it might be a possibility. I would definitely recommend rocking the knife back and forth on a flat surface to see if the chopping action is to your liking. If you find you bang knuckles, a little adjustment to the profile is usually all it takes to make a huge difference in the use of the knife.

 

Great work so far and excited to see how these turn out!

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Thanks Aiden. I see what you mean with the handle alignment and the back 1/4 of the blade. Could be a problem. I will check on that to make sure. If it is a problem would cutting the handle down to a hidden tang instead seem like a good way of saving the knife?

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2 hours ago, Rob R Nunez said:

If it is a problem would cutting the handle down to a hidden tang instead seem like a good way of saving the knife?

 

Yes indeed it would be.  If it's an issue, which it may be.  A Japanese-style handle would fix that.

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5 hours ago, Rob R Nunez said:

If it is a problem would cutting the handle down to a hidden tang instead seem like a good way of saving the knife?

You could also take some off of the profile on the half towards the tip so that the handle angles up from the cutting board slightly when the edge is resting on the board, if that makes sense. I tend to like chef's knives to be sort of triangle shaped and somewhat narrow towards the tip, so it could also be my personal preference coming through (though that shape does have some advantages like giving more board clearance for the same width at the heel). 

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nice work, My take on the profiles (for what its worth!) is in line with the other comments. The big one probably has a bit much 'pot belly' in the middle 1/3rd of the edge. (it will concertina cut against a board unless you use a 'sweeping' pull cut.)

 

The petties could use a tiny bit more up-sweep towards the tip (ie, they are a bit flat in profile, and the tip is a bit low relative to the centre line of the handle) 

 

Funny thing with kitchen knives, from my own messing with them, is that a 1/16" change in profile can make a massive difference to the knife feeling and looking right. A tiny change can transform them. 

 

I think they will all be good with the western handles as you have made them with a few tweaks to the edge profiles. Best advice I was given was to test cut kitchen produce with my knives, and compare it to a cheap supermarket knife (kitchen devils or similar) - The store knives cut depressingly well. You know when yours is 'right' as you smile when you are cutting with it. 

 

Kitchen knives are the most difficult to make imho, as they get used for long periods by professionals. No amount of mosaic pins, fancy handles and file work will compensate for blade performance! - I suspect thats why im drawn to making them :)

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