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Induction Forges (On Amazon!)


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I've had an induction forge since 2012. I purchased mine from a guy I heard of on the forum (I forget the gent's name now) who later passed away. I was basically under the impression that there were no small, craft level induction forges on the market. So, I was very surprised to find not one but two on Amazon. 

 

The first one looks pretty much exactly like mine. I think I paid around $2,000 for mine (I can't remember exactly), but this one is under $600.

 

Anyway, I have no idea if these are good units or not, but I thought I'd share. Sorry if this is old news.

 

Dave

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/VEVOR-Frequency-Induction-Furnace-LH-15A(2200℃/dp/B081GLGSNW/ref=psdc_516188_t2_B01M05Z7CO

 

https://www.amazon.com/30-80-Frequency-Induction-Heater-Furnace/dp/B01M05Z7CO/ref=sr_1_44_sspa?dchild=1&keywords=venturi+burner&qid=1600304861&sr=8-44-spons&psc=1&smid=A20QEF2LEKCK8G&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUFMWlA3NzczS0FHU1MmZW5jcnlwdGVkSWQ9QTAzNzA2MDczM1EyUlE1RjdPMFBZJmVuY3J5cHRlZEFkSWQ9QTA4MDYyNzgyUFBNSFRBWjdJTVcxJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfbXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

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Dave, since you had an induction forge for ~8 years. What's your verdict? How often do you use it? What do you use it for? I would imagine that oxidization is probably much more prevalent unless you house it in some kind of noble gas.

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Niels,

 

I find that I use it to refine the shape of blades, etc. It's handy, not essential. In my shop in Florida I use it to do any forging to shape because I can do it with the shop closed up and the AC running. 

 

I have used it to weld small pieces together (lap welds) with a lot of flux and it seems to work. Scale is definitely an issue. 

 

Also, definitely coat the coils with refractory, otherwise if you touch the work piece to the coils is shorts out. Finally, be paranoid as hell about wearing any metal when using it. If you get your belt buckle too close to the coil it'll ruin your whole day. . . 

 

I'm glad I have it, but I could easily live without it.

 

Dave

 

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2 hours ago, Dave Stephens said:

definitely coat the coils with refractory

 

Steve Kayne (a local-to-me supplier, owns Blacksmith's Depot now)  would sell them with a roll of ceramic fiber paper like a toilet paper tube you could put inside the coil.  You can buy a small roll of (or sheets of) the paper from any kiln supply place, it's cleaner and tougher than refractory clay but you can't see through it.  Now I sort of wonder if you couldn't find a fused quartz tube...

 

Steve also didn't use flux with them.  His selling trick was to do a butt weld on 3/8" round mild by holding one piece in each hand, sticking into the coils, hitting the power until they turned white, then touching the ends together.  Cut the power, count to five (so it'd cool enough not to droop under its own weight), and remove the now-one-piece rod.

 

I never got very close to one myself, but that's good to know about metal!  I can see me getting a third-degree ring burn or melting my watch... :blink:

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On 9/19/2020 at 12:50 PM, Dave Stephens said:

Scale is definitely an issue. 

 

On 9/18/2020 at 10:04 PM, Niels Provos said:

 I would imagine that oxidization is probably much more prevalent unless you house it in some kind of noble gas.

 

Why is this?  Simply because there is more oxygen present than in a forge that is using the oxygen for combustion?  Or does the electric field have something to do with it?

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2 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

Why is this?  Simply because there is more oxygen present than in a forge that is using the oxygen for combustion?  Or does the electric field have something to do with it?

 

Yes, precisely. I can dial in my propane forge so that there is no excess oxygen or even run it with excess fuel, i.e. a reducing atmosphere. While I have never worked with an induction forge, I imagine most would run them in regular air with lots of oxygen around happy to create scale.

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A number of years back, when Grant was still around, a couple of us were trying to figure out how to combine an induction forge and rolling mill to pump out billets.  We decided it could be done if one was able to create a box of some sort to fill with argon or other sheilding gas to prevent oxidation.  We decided it wasn't worth the effort to try, partly because it would have involved building a rolling mill as well.

Edited by billyO
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On 9/19/2020 at 3:04 PM, Alan Longmire said:

Steve also didn't use flux with them.  His selling trick was to do a butt weld on 3/8" round mild by holding one piece in each hand, sticking into the coils, hitting the power until they turned white, then touching the ends together.  Cut the power, count to five (so it'd cool enough not to droop under its own weight), and remove the now-one-piece rod.

I saw him do that trick, it was sweet and only took a few moments. 

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Steve brought one up to Harley's hammer-in the last year Don Fogg showed up, 2007, maybe?  Don used it to forge a small blade and pronounced it to be black magic not to be messed with by mere mortal bladesmiths.  John N brought one to Owen's in 2011 and it had much the same effect.  The cool factor is undeniable, though. I suspect if I had one I'd use it more for casting precious metals than forging steel.  

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