Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Curious photo,gents.

It was sent to me by a friend,and in the process lost any and all attribution:)

 

These are obviously Akinaks,a type of knife or dagger stemming(most often)from Western(-ish) Siberia...(i'll leave off any more specific cultural identification,it gets all hazy there quick).

 

It's uncommon to see quite such elaborate ones.But mainly i wanted to ask what you guys think about the jointure of ferrous/non-ferrous here-a weld?Or some technique having to do with mechanical joint?

 

Anyway,casual question,mainly just a cool-looking photo...:)

2020-10-06.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a variant of damascene work on the blades (the dagger handles are probably cast).  Not Koftgari, but the thicker, actual plating kind of mechanical lock into a keyed substrate.  There are many ways to achieve the effect, and the alloy used has a bit to do with how it's done.  Gold is easiest, then fine silver.  It could be soldered or a eutectic bond, especially on the really fancy one.  I'd love to see those up close and in person, there's a lot to learn in those pieces...  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Right on,Alan,thanks.

 

I wish i knew what's up with these...Off the cuff i'd say these look like Scythian "Animal style";and must be famous artefacts...BM?...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the picture, these are really amazing artefacts.

 

To my eyes it looks like the gold is either inlayed, or fused to the iron.

Think of the korean ''keum-bo'' process, this technique was actually quite widespread as it is quite easy to get pure gold to stick to other metals.

 

But as always with historical stuff, I might be totally wrong.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The more elaborate one must be a famous artefact,as it's images figure in a number of assorted articles.

 

An example of some(rather disjointed) info here,on what appears to be a Turkish blog:

(unfortunately my internet speed won't even let me see 99% of photos there;but yeah,by all appearances it's something from the Sayano-Altai burial mounds)

 

https://tarihvearkeoloji.blogspot.com/2016/03/akinak-alp.html?m=1

Link to post
Share on other sites

Aw crap....(i should've known though :(...)...Of course,it's from Tuva,the famous dig at the so-called "Valley of the Kings",specifically the burial mound Arzhan-2.

 

In spite of an international group allegedly working there,it'll all be subject to the ubiquitous Mordorese dysfunction...:(

 

https://siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/features/f0212-focus-on-tuva-stunning-treasures-and-macabre-slaughter-in-siberias-prehistoric-valley-of-the-kings/

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...