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It forges extremely easily, but it has nowhere near enough carbon to make a good knife (0.20%C when you want more like 0.60% minimum).  Good for some other tooling, like tongs and fuller dies.  

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D2 is an air hardening steel and, as such, is not suitable for normalizing.  Not sure of how well it would move under the hammer but you can definitely make knives from it if you are able to handle it's characteristics.  O-1 can be forged and heat treated in a gas or solid fuel forges but a regulated electric oven works better for it and the D2.  I know a local supply with good prices is something I think we all wish we had but you need to match your steel with your tools that you have to forge and heat treat it.

 

Doug

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I would never recommend D2 to an inexperienced smith, or one who doesn't have a good setup for air-hardening steels.  It will just frustrate you.

O1, on the other hand, is good stuff.  It needs a little care in the heat treat, but it makes an excellent knife.  And a buck per pound is nice!  

Welcome aboard. 

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If you want to go the stock removal route D2 would work but as others have said....it IS a tough material for a beginner to work with....I burned up a lot of man hours in the shop with D2 simply because I had several hundred pounds of scrap to work with that didn't cost me anything...once I settled on only using D2 for stock removal my workability improved immensely...during your learning curve you might want to consider either 1084 or 1075...much easier and more forgiving materials to start out with...

 

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Thank for your info it's vary helpful ! The reason I started asking about the 8620 is do having a hard time finding a anvil in my area most of them are 700+$ for a 100 +lbs anvil so I found this man who had a alternative which was a piece of 8620  16" round stock 16" tall and I was sure that would do the trick. 

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Thank you all for your info to let you know what I have to work with I have a double burner gas forge and a treadle hammer with a 100lbs head and I'm going to make my hand tool because I like making all my own stuff just like the thammer and forge 

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The 8620 "anvil" will be fine.  It's not hard, but it's tougher than mild steel to get you started.  Much better than cast iron, which is what a lot of new guys start on!  8620 is designed to be case hardened or carbonitrided for a decent combo of toughness and wear resistance. That's not something you can easily do to the big chunk on your shop, but case hardening is easy enough on small parts.  It'll also make excellent tongs, etc.

 

It also occurs to me that if your guy has D2 and O1 round bar, he probably has or can get W1, aka water-hard drill rod.  That makes an excellent blade and is even easier to heat treat in your setup, just don't water quench it.  My go-to steel for almost any blade is 1084.  Very simple heat treat, easy to forge, pretty forgiving of forging a little hot or a little cold, and plenty tough.

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I asked and he didn't have any on hand but was going to check on price. The stuff he has on hand now is stuff that was there when he got the shop so he he is trying to sell it at a doller a pound but I've got him down to about .35 a lbs .

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  • 2 months later...

I have the propellor shaft to a liberty ship ( now cut into smaller lengths ) ..I was told by the old timer  who sold it to me it was ( 8620 ). I took it to the welding shop next door for cutting and was told it ruined a couple of blades..that cutting job cost more than I expected. I have used these 7" diameter pieces as anvils .

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8620 as the guys have said is a case hardening steel.  I have a couple hundred pounds of it in 3/4, 7/8 and 1 inch diameter.  Specifically they are drag conveyor pins, used for joining the large steel drag conveyors used in industry.   Not a knife steel.     

 

I have used it for reloading dies and cast bullet sizing dies as it case hardens nicely.    I throw the pins in the wood stove with a good fire going and leave in the stove until the fire goes out and is cold.   Anneals the pin surface  down to about Rockwell 20 on the C scale so I can machine it without killing tooling.

 

Having a Rockwell tester in my shop simplifies things.

 

DSCN6565.JPG

 

 

Edited by John Ricks
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