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Looking for steel recommendations


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I'm looking to build an EDC for a friend of mine who is very hard on his knives.  What would be the recommended steel choice to stand up to everyday abuse?  I only have simple heat treat methods so I'm leaning towards 80CrV2, but I thought I'd throw it out here for opinions before I place an order.

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May be a little late if you've already ordered the O1, but for hard use blades, I'm starting to fall in love with 8670 due to the simple HT...

Edited by Bill Schmalhofer
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Alex......, I’ll help confuse you more! I recently found good old 52100 to be a new favorite.;)

Gary LT

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All I will say is that years ago I made an EDC/hunter knife for a buddy who is originally from Mississippi. The knife was O1. He took it with him on a visit back home and his brother took it gator hunting. When My friend came home without that knife and a request for 3 more of them, I felt a certain pride.

1 hour ago, Joël Mercier said:

1084 is twice as tough as 1095 and O1 and as you know, it's easy to HT. 

 

Check out this chart from Knife steel nerds. It will also depend on your HT.

That all depends on how you define "toughness" and everything depends on the HT.

Edited by Joshua States
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Awesome chart Joël!  Thanks! 

 

Also a fan of 52100 here.    And have never used O1, so can't say.   What a about a San Mai with soft iron?  Not sure if that would perform better or worse than a differentialy heat treated blade, or a full spring tempered blade.  Depends on what your friend is doing with the knife I guess.   Throwing them a concrete walls or prying doors open, or just cutting lots of cardboard all day.  I also agree with Garry Keown and the scandi grind.     52100 is nice to work with and keeps a good edge.  Just keep it hot.

 

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7 hours ago, Bruno said:

Also a fan of 52100 here.    And have never used O1, so can't say.

They are pretty similar, so if you like 52100, you will probably like O1. There is a reason these two steels are used frequently by tool makers for hard use and hard wearing applications.

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12 hours ago, Joshua States said:

That all depends on how you define "toughness

The amount of plastic deformation the steel can endure before breaking. I believe that's how the guys who make the charts define it.

 

Generic picture from Google. Toughness is defined by the plastic range I believe. I'm sure our metalurgist can weight in at this point :lol:.

main-qimg-86ab4f919bd32fa89b8cffa8399fff00.webp

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I really do appreciate all the input guys.  I think this is a classic case of "Ask 5 different bladesmiths and you'll get 6 different answers". :D

I ordered a stick of precision ground O1 from McMaster-Carr yesterday.  I have a very short time frame for this blade, so it is going to be a stock removal project instead of forging.  After reading up on it, I doubt I'll be able to get a perfect heat treat with my equipment, but it should be close enough to get the job done.

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To solidly your decision even more Alex, Randall has used 01 in their blades for years. They were buying it from Sheffield steel, and reckon they still are.

there ya go!

Gary LT

 

 

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In material science/metallurgy, toughness is defined as the area under the stress strain curve.  In industry this is generally measured via a Charpy impact test (and sometimes an Izod impact test, which is very similar).  This is basically a calibrated hammer-on-a-pendulum.  When it swings there is a certain amount of energy in the hammer.  When a sample is struck and broken the hammer is slowed and the amount of reduction in the swing is used to determine the amount of energy needed to break the sample.  This is generally measured in ft-lbs (or Joules), as reported in the graph Joel posted from KSN.  Unfortunately, impact loading breaks things (steel, in this case) a bit different than slower loading.  So looking at the stress strain curve (slow/controlled tensile loading) AND the Charpy impact test data is the most useful way to look at how tough a material is.  

 

Y'all want to hear/read/see a terrible joke? 

 

Tough guy.JPG

This is a tough guy.  

 

Hey, I said it was terrible.  

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