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Recently finished tomahawk.  I dubbed it the "HammerHawk" as it's previous life was spent as a ball peen hammer.  

 

Forged from a ball peen hammer, steel is cold blued, fitted with a curly maple handle, and a leather sheath.   

 

 

20210212_134113

 

20210212_134034

 

 

20210212_134053

Edited by Stephen Stumbo
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That’s very nice. Did you weld a bit in? Or is that just the grind line on the edge? Also, what did you use to finish the handle? It’s beautiful! 
 

Thanks, Jon 

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1 hour ago, Jon Bishop said:

That’s very nice. Did you weld a bit in? Or is that just the grind line on the edge? Also, what did you use to finish the handle? It’s beautiful! 
 

Thanks, Jon 

Thank ya.   The line you're seeing is the quench line.   Behind that line it's un-hardened.  

 

I used "majestic maple" it's a chromic trioxide mix that I find really pops the color and chatoyance of curly maple.  

 

26 minutes ago, Gerald Boggs said:

That's quite nice, and as it started life as a ball peen, Bloody Nice :-)

Thank ya very much sir.  

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I couldn’t tell on my phone what the edge line is. I get it now. That is some very nice work. The grooves you put in front of the eye look great. Makes me want to get back on some projects. I looked up that handle finish. Did you buy the stain from RW Wilson knives?

 

Thanks, Jon

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That is a nice piece. 

 

Like everyone else I'm also mesmerized by the finish on the haft.  Until very recently I thought that sort of color was always aqua fortis.  Recently I learned that there is also iron nitrate, which I assumed was related to aqua fortis (nitric acid) but people who use it say it is different.  Now I hear about "chromic acid".  I need to learn more about these...

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For the record, when wood finishing people say aqua fortis they mean ferric nitrate.  When antiquarian chemists say aqua fortis they mean nitric acid.  Nitric alone does enhance the grain, but doesn't add color. Well, it does add orange, but that's not really helpful...

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Thanks Alan.  I've been itching to do a Kibler Flintlock kit, and the guys finishing them all debate aqua Fortis a ferric nitrate.  From what you said, I'm guessing they are getting misled by branding or labeling.

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Yep.  To keep it clear, if you use ferric nitrate to stain the wood, you can call it aqua fortis stain, but not plain aqua fortis.  There was an outfit called Wahkon Bay that used to sell ferric nitrate labeled as aqua fortis stain, that may be where the confusion got started.  

 

Sorry to hijack the thread, Stephen!  Do you use heat on the chromic acid like you do the ferric nitrate?  

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On 2/24/2021 at 11:20 AM, Alan Longmire said:

Yep.  To keep it clear, if you use ferric nitrate to stain the wood, you can call it aqua fortis stain, but not plain aqua fortis.  There was an outfit called Wahkon Bay that used to sell ferric nitrate labeled as aqua fortis stain, that may be where the confusion got started.  

 

Sorry to hijack the thread, Stephen!  Do you use heat on the chromic acid like you do the ferric nitrate?  

Hey Alan.  No problem, I always enjoy learning the history surrounding this craft. 

 

As to your question, I do not.  I simply finish sand, and whisker the CM haft, then brush on the chromic trioxide. After it dries, I go at it with 0000 steel wool, till the grain is popped out, and the finish is as slick as I want it.   
 

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