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I tried figuring out where to put this but it seems much in the spirit of the fiery beard, so here it is! 
 

I made a ring as a Christmas present for my girlfriend a couple years ago, it was a simple silver lined ring made from bloomery iron. She wanted it veeeeery thin so I did so, and after a few years of daily wear the iron finally wore through in one spot, and the ring was done. So I started brainstorming the next iteration! 
 

I love the traditional spear wolf tooth pattern, and think that among the different ways to achieve this pattern it's the most impressive and interesting to me. It's a unique process in that every step of its creation is present in the grain of the metals. You can see how much is forged and displaced and planned and it's a pattern where mass stock removal is necessary in order to achieve a good result without stretching the pattern. I've used it on a bunch of seaxes even though this particular strain of wolf tooth was never seen on seaxes to my knowledge. 
 

The photos of the process are scarce... I basically went into the shop on a Saturday and spent about five hours working on it, and didn't really think to document the process, but I'll explain it briefly here. I started with a flat piece of 1200 layer pattern weld that was punched and drifted to make a ring shape, oversized in every dimension. I made a small punch in the shape of the small teeth I wanted and basically created a radiant sun pattern in the surface of the ring. Once this was clean and fairly even I let it cool, and forged a small piece of iron to the same size, and then pressed the iron at a high welding heat into the cold steel. I quenched them together as soon as they were pressed and then took them to the sand blaster for clean up. After they were clean I actually drilled and removed the rest of the overhang of material from the pressing of the iron into the steel. This allows for flux to escape from the inside and outside of the ring during forge welding.
 

I then used a small pair of tongs to hold it all together, and sprinkled some borax and welded it with a wooden mallet. 
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That brings us here, with a forge welded iron and Damascus ring blank. 

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Next is the ring liner, 18 gauge fine silver to the size of her finger, based on the old ring that broke. 

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Once soldered the steel and iron are opened up to fit the liner 

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Once the liner is fit, it's gently forged around the slightly chamfered steel body of the ring, and then belt ground to size, then etched to bring out the pattern. 

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And here you have it! Finished ring with wolf teeth about twice as small as the smallest examples I've seen in the archaeological record. 

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Edited by Emiliano Carrillo
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Jeez, Emiliano this is a really well crafted idea. Seems the idea can be transferred to a small knife, though slightly larger teeth.

Really nice, thanks for posting!

Gary LT

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1 hour ago, Brian Dougherty said:

Well, that is cool as all get out.  I'm glad you posted it!

That makes two of us!  Although, it seems like Jeff had a pic of a small spearhead with teeny tiny teeth.  I'll have to look, but still, this is seriously cool. B)

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Oh man this is just so cool! I haven´t even been brave enough to try regular wolfs teeth, let alone teeny tiny ones.

 

Every time you post Emilliano I get the feeling that I need to step up my game. ;)

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17 hours ago, Pieter-Paul Derks said:

Every time you post Emilliano I get the feeling that I need to step up my game

Don't we all.......

Very cool dude, very cool.

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That's rad! I love this type of less-than-typical welding, it really has a certain sort of feel to it that all those fancy mosaics never come close to achieving. It  may have been exactly this that I remember you posting about that initially inspired it, but this would look killer on a socket of a spear. 

 

Too cool!

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