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Tooln's First knife WIP


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There maybe some time between post but this is a start.  This will be my first knife.  I started by making a jig to grind the bevel.

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Then I made a jig to hold while sanding.

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Made a pattern and glued it to some 1095.  That's all for today.  Since this is all new for me I'm open for critiques.

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Edited by MLeonard
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Yeah, but you didn't forge it to shape!

You didn't refine your own steel... you didn't.... :D:D

 

Just kidding. 

 

What you did do-

was think this through.

You made a plan before jumping into it.

You did your research to make the tools you could see that would let you have decent results at your first shot grinding an edge.

 

I think you've got a great start, and look forward to the finished project.

 

If you have any questions- please ask them.

The only stupid questions are the un-asked.

 

Stupid answers- now...:lol:

Edited by Welsh joel
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10 hours ago, Welsh joel said:

Yeah, but you didn't forge it to shape!

You didn't refine your own steel... you didn't.... :D:D

 

Just kidding. 

 

What you did do-

was think this through.

You made a plan before jumping into it.

You did your research to make the tools you could see that would let you have decent results at your first shot grinding an edge.

 

I think you've got a great start, and look forward to the finished project.

 

If you have any questions- please ask them.

The only stupid questions are the un-asked.

 

Stupid answers- now...:lol:

I do plan to forge my own steel some day.  Once I get relocated and new shop setup.  Right now I'm limited on space.  

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4 hours ago, MLeonard said:

I do plan to forge my own steel some day.  Once I get relocated and new shop setup.  Right now I'm limited on space.  

 

Was just joking with ya man. 

The whole forged vs stock removal thing... :P

But thats awesome!

 

To me, I don't care how you made something if it looks cool, and works great. Just from what you've presented, looks like you have a good game plan- and a decent goal.

 

I like to watch people improve and hit their goals. So, I'll be watching!

Edited by Welsh joel
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35 minutes ago, Welsh joel said:

 

Was just joking with ya man. 

The whole forged vs stock removal thing... :P

But thats awesome!

 

To me, I don't care how you made something if it looks cool, and works great. Just from what you've presented, looks like you have a good game plan- and a decent goal.

 

I like to watch people improve and hit their goals. So, I'll be watching!

I knew you were joking.  I can give them out just as easy as getting them.  I love building stuff and also like to have a good plan.  I'm most worried about heat treat and tempering.  I plan to make a fire brick forge powered by a map gas torch and heat treat with a old toaster oven I just picked up.  As time goes on I'll also update these.

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Welcome to the madness! 

 

You have a solid game plan. I will caution you may not be able to get that whole blade up to hardening temp with a MAPP torch in a firebrick forge.  It's doable, you'll just have to do a lot of stroking it through the hot spot.  Of course you don't want to harden the tang anyway, so that's less to worry about.  

The big thing with 1095 is quench speed.  Once it's up to 1450F you have less than one second to drop it below around 900F or it won't harden.  Warm (130 degree) canola will do it on a thin blade.   

 

And old toaster ovens are excellent for tempering, just be sure to test the temperature with an oven thermometer before you trust the dial.  They can be off by 50 to 75 degrees either way.  A pan of sand or a half-slab of hard firebrick in the oven will help with the temperature swings.  My toaster oven reads 50 degrees hot by the dial (set it for 400 and you get 350) and without a pile of brick chunks in there it swings between 325-400 when set for 400. With the brick chunks is swings from 335-350,after fine adjustment of the dial. Have it on for an hour before you want to temper to make sure it's up to heat and holding steady.

 

 

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Well I'm getting a little done.  Just about ready for heat treat.  I've got supplies ordered to modify the toaster oven.  I'm putting in a digital temp control so I can run a PID loop to maintain temp.

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Well I voided all warranties today on the toaster oven. Well not that it had any because it was a used one that I bought. I got my temperature controller hooked up and I can now run a PID loop to hold temperature. The only thing I don't like about this controller is it displays in centigrade and not Fahrenheit so I need to do the conversion which is no big dealing. Did a test run up to 400 and held it there within 10°. I'm going to insulate the toaster oven a little bit better just to be more economical. Getting closer to completion.

 

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Putting a big piece of fire brick, or a pan of sand, in the bottom will help tremendously with the temperature swings.  It adds thermal mass which makes the temperature swings much slower, which will give your PID a chance to keep up.

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12 hours ago, Alex Middleton said:

Putting a big piece of fire brick, or a pan of sand, in the bottom will help tremendously with the temperature swings.  It adds thermal mass which makes the temperature swings much slower, which will give your PID a chance to keep up.

I have plans of adding fire brick to the inside.  It's on order & should be here today or tomorrow.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

The old saying is forge thick, grind thin... I've heard forge to a nickel, grind to a dime.

 

The point is- too thin on a blade before heat treat can cause you to burn the edge, warp it, before you even get to sharpening.

 

I recently did my first hollow ground blade- i went thin on the edge... when I went to heat it for quenching, the edge curled up in an S in two places. 

 

I heated it slowly, straightened the edge again... and reheated, moving it in & out of my forge- slowly heating the whole blade. It still warped a bit over the whole blade...

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With 1095 in oil I go to around 0.025" if the spine is thick.  If it's a wide thin blade like a kitchen knife I leave it a bit thicker.  If you have excellent heat control you can go thinner, but the thinner you go the more you risk warps and decarb.  And if you're quenching in water, add cracks and outright breakage to the list.

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I'll be quenching in canola oil.  I'll take it to about a dime's thickness.  Thanks guys.

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Grandkids were supposed to visit today so heat treat was planned for tomorrow.  Wouldn't you know grandkids changed the plans.  The wife wasn't even off the phone and I was setting up.  Finished my first heat treat and the blade has been in the tempering oven for 15 minutes now.   Heat treat went well & the blade is hard.  It was cool watching the steel turn colors and go into the non magnetic state.  

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You need to watch for the shadow to pass over the steel (decalesense) to show you that it has gone through a phase change.  Becoming non-magnetic is actually just a little lower than that.

 

Doug

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I think you got it. B)  The other test, which works better on thinner edges, is the brass rod test.  To do that, lay a brass rod on the table and press the side of the edge on the rod, at about a 20-degree angle or so. Press down hard.  The edge should flex and return to true.  If it chips it was too hard, if it stays flexed it was too soft.  That said, if it held up to hammering into that hickory it'll be fine.

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FYI, tempering is part of heat treat, and the scale is only tangentially related to carbon.  Scale is oxide, so whenever possible carbon will go to the oxygen, but if the conditions are right then the oxygen will go after the iron, thus scale forms rather than decarb (which will be formed under the scale).  

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Not bad at all and better than my first. Critique if you care for it:

Good overall shape.
The handle finish looks fine and you don’t seem to have chipped out the wood at the pins.

Your handle looks quite blocky though. It is a common feature of beginner knives and I had mine. Even if it feels comfortable it will create hotspots in the hand with prolonged use.

The lanyard hole could do with a metal lining to prevent chipping out, etc. Brake or fuel line can work well for this.

The front of the handle looks a bit unsupported and I would be a little worried about that breaking if knocked.
The blade seems to have some retained scratches but could just be the light.

Again, a fine first knife. How does it feel knowing you have made it?

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Charles dP said:

Not bad at all and better than my first. Critique if you care for it:

Good overall shape.
The handle finish looks fine and you don’t seem to have chipped out the wood at the pins.

Your handle looks quite blocky though. It is a common feature of beginner knives and I had mine. Even if it feels comfortable it will create hotspots in the hand with prolonged use.

The lanyard hole could do with a metal lining to prevent chipping out, etc. Brake or fuel line can work well for this.

The front of the handle looks a bit unsupported and I would be a little worried about that breaking if knocked.
The blade seems to have some retained scratches but could just be the light.

Again, a fine first knife. How does it feel knowing you have made it?

I welcome the critique.  Can't wait for the rest.  I made a display holder for it and have it on the fireplace till it goes to the guy I made it for.  The wife even likes it and wants one for the fireplace.  This picture is not on the fireplace but it shows the holder.

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Edited by MLeonard
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1 hour ago, MLeonard said:

This picture is not on the fireplace

 

And here I thought this was a new trend of an all-wood fireplace! :lol:

 

Looks great! I like how it matches the antler.

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