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Playing with file work


Joshua States

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Most of you know that I really like doing file work on my handles. File work doesn't have to be complex or ornate to achieve a dramatic effect. Sometimes quite simple things can look just as eye catching as the more robust patterns. The foundation of any patterned file work is in the layout. This must be consistent and symmetrical along the length of the work piece. Here you can see the three starter lines to provide a border and the tick marks along both edges. The diagonal lines are cut with a jeweler's saw.

 

File work process (1).jpg

 

You need really good task lighting, some magnifying eyewear, and something to hold the workpiece very stable.

File work process (2).jpg

 

You have to reposition the workpiece several time in order the get the same angle on each cut.

 

File work process (3).jpg

 

if the pattern uses multiple files for different angles in a stepped process, complete the first step on the whole piece before moving to the next tool. Sometimes it help to clean the piece off and inspect the work as well.

 

File work process (4).jpg

 

When you think you have it done, assemble the handle parts and check the look. You may have to make some adjustments.

 

File work process (5).jpg

 

The 3-piece spacer for this knife has a very simple looking pattern. It is a deceptive simplicity though. This requires absolute symmetry. As each piece gets done individually, the package must be assembled frequently to check the form.

 

Spacer Package (3).jpg

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“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

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Thanks Alan, but it was really meant to show folks that they don't have to get heavily involved with patterns like rope and vine or even S pattern to start out. 

Those patterns take multiple files and compound cutting angles.

These simpler geometric styles are technically "simple". They just rely heavily on consistency in the layout to achieve the effect. The above pattern takes a jeweler's saw and a modified margin file. This pattern takes a jeweler's saw and a small round file. All straight cuts.

 

V2 Frame (1).jpg

 

The pattern on the spacer package take a triangle file and a margin file.

Edited by Joshua States

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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11 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Thanks Alan, but it was really meant to show folks that they don't have to get heavily involved with patterns like rope and vine or even S pattern to start out.


Still, it would be a shame to stop there; nudge-nudge, wink-wink, know what I mean? Say no more...;)

"The way we win matters" (Ender Wiggins) Orson Scott Card

 

Nos qui libertate donati nescimus quid constat

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